Cases reported "Osteochondroma"

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1/47. Evanescent exostosis. A new case.

    Much has been written about the natural history of osteochondromas, but there are only a few reports in the literature reflecting the spontaneous disappearance of this lesion. For that reason, we report an additional case which makes the total number of reported cases eleven, and also includes a review of the literature.
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2/47. Isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral exostosis.

    We report an isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral osteochondroma that became symptomatic after the patient played recreational basketball. Lesion resection resulted in complete deficit resolution. Mass lesions involving the musculocutaneous nerve should be considered in patients with atraumatic, isolated musculocutaneous neuropathies that are recurrent or fail to recover, even in the setting of strenuous exercise.
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3/47. Treatment of cervical cord compression, caused by hereditary multiple exostosis, with laminoplasty: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report. OBJECTIVES: Successful excision of the exostosis within the spinal canal. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Myelopathy caused by exostosis within the spinal canal developed in a 13-year-old boy with hereditary multiple exostosis. methods: Spinous process-splitting laminoplasty with an ultrasonic knife was performed to remove the mass and minimize the possibility of postlaminectomy kyphosis. RESULTS: The spinal canal exostosis with cervical cord compression was excised successfully with laminoplasty. After surgery there has been no recurrence of tumor, and the stability of the cervical spine has been preserved. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of laminoplasty as a useful surgical approach for intraspinal exostosis to prevent postoperative cervical instability.
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4/47. Pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery caused by exostosis of the femur: case report and review of the literature.

    A 13-year-old boy with a solitary exostosis of the left femur was seen with a pseudo-aneurysm of the popliteal artery. When left leg pain occurred 3 months earlier, radiographic examination revealed an exostosis with a cartilage cap. Serial radiographic examination demonstrated gradual disruption of the cartilage cap of the exostosis as the pseudoaneurysm developed. An exostosis with an irregular surface was found at surgery. A literature review disclosed 39 similar cases in which loss of the cartilage cap was considered as one of the causes of the aneurysm formation. Considering the clinical course of our patient, however, we believe that exostoses lose their cartilage caps by pressure destruction due to the aneurysms. It is highly probable that loss of the cartilage does not cause the aneurysms.
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5/47. Scapular osteochondroma with reactive bursitis presenting as a chest wall tumour.

    A 32-year-old male presented with a painful, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass. A malignant chest wall neoplasm was suspected. A CT scan was performed which showed a mass extending from under the scapular and an exostosis arising from the anterior surface of the scapular. The mass and exostosis were resected resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. Histological examination showed the mass to be a reactive bursa, with no evidence of neoplasia.
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6/47. osteochondroma of the tibia and popliteal artery stenosis.

    In our department, an osteochondroma of the tibia in a young girl with intermittent claudication of the right leg was treated. Many instrumental examinations were performed in order to exclude an arterial disorder. As the patient shows signs of arterial compression, an operative procedure to remove the exostosis was performed.
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7/47. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions.

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 /- 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone.
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8/47. A deceptive cervical lymph node: a solitary spinal osteochondroma.

    INTRODUCTION: osteochondroma of the cervical spine is an uncommon bony tumour. CLINICAL PICTURE: We present a case which was misdiagnosed as a posterior cervical lymph node. The patient presented with a tender neck lump and was seen by two surgical departments. They eventually diagnosed it as an osteochondroma and referred the patient to our department. This exostosis arose from the lamina of C3 vertebra and extended posteriorly. The patient presented with persistent neck ache but had no neurological deficit. TREATMENT: It was excised uneventfully. CONCLUSION: From the literature review, this appears to be the first case where an exostosis arose from a spinal facet joint. A discussion of osteochondromas follows.
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9/47. Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (Nora's lesion): a retrospective study of 12 cases, 2 arising in long bones.

    Twelve cases of bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP), also known as Nora's lesion, are reported. Ten lesions were located in the small bones of the hands, and 2 were located in long bones (femur and proximal tibia). Patient age ranged from 12 to 63 years (average, 30.3 years). radiography of the lesions in the hand bones showed calcific masses attached to the underlying cortex, without interruption of the latter. The long bone lesions revealed unusual findings. In the femur, BPOP presented with extensive cortical destruction and was suggestive of a malignant lesion. This presentation has not been described to date. In the tibia, the lesion was located in the soft tissue without cortical attachment. This type of BPOP probably represents an immature lesion that over time will mature to solid cortical attachment. On histologic examination, all lesions demonstrated 3 distinct components with variable degrees of representation: (1) hypercellular cartilage with calcification and ossification, with the calcified cartilage having a characteristic basophilic tinctorial quality; (2) cancellous bone undergoing maturation; and (3) spindle cell stroma without cytologic atypia. In 1 case with a long-standing history, the cartilaginous component was minimal. BPOP, together with florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis, may represent different stages in the development of a posttraumatic proliferative process. BPOP apparently arises from the periosteal tissues through a process of cartilaginous metaplasia.
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10/47. Unusual presentation of rib exostosis.

    We report two cases of unusual presentation of rib exostosis. The first patient presented acutely with hemorrhagic shock due to massive hemothorax, and the second patient presented with repetitive chest infection complicated by empyema. In both patients, preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest revealed rib exostoses, necessitating thoracotomy and rib resection.
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