Cases reported "Osteochondroma"

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1/14. An extra-articular cause of locking knee.

    We report an uncommon case of locking of the knee in a 23-year-old girl. It was due to an osteochondroma at the medial aspect of the proximal tibia.
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keywords = tibia
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2/14. Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica of the proximal tibia showing epiphyseal osteochondroma in an adult.

    A 33-year-old woman was referred to our hospital complaining of pain and a tumorous lesion in her left knee joint in the absence of any history of trauma. Radiological examinations demonstrated an osseous mass originating from the epiphysis of the proximal tibia, with a continuous osteoblastic lesion involving the lateral half of the epiphysis. The pathological diagnosis of these lesions was compatible with that of osteochondroma. The clinical and pathological features of this case were considered to be identical with those of dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica, although this patient was older than patients described in previous reports, and demonstrated no other symptoms such as valgus or varus deformity or limb-length discrepancy.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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3/14. arthrodesis of the distal tibiofibular joint for a large osteochondroma in an adult.

    A case of a large osteochondroma of the distal tibia with distortion of the distal tibiofibular joint is presented. This could not be managed by traditional means, as excision would have resulted in ankle and tibiofibular joint instability. The problem was overcome by performing an arthrodesis. Only enough bone from both the tibia and the fibula was excised to provide a host bed for bone graft. We believe that symptomatic osteochondromata should usually be excised. However, if this would result in damage, then the method described offers an alternative management strategy.
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ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
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4/14. Osteochondromyxoma of bone: a congenital tumor associated with lentigines and other unusual disorders.

    This article describes the clinical and pathologic features of four unusual bone tumors. Three were congenital or most likely so; the fourth, detected at age 1 year, was probably of considerable duration. The patients, three boys and one girl, each presented with a painless mass. Two had the carney complex, a familial lentiginous and multiorgan tumorous syndrome; another probably had this disorder; the fourth did not show it, but his mother did. The tumors occurred in the nasal region (n = 2) and the diaphysis of the tibia and radius (n = 1 each). Roentgenographically, three had benign characteristics; the fourth, malignant features. Grossly, the tumors were gelatinous, cartilaginous. and bony. Microscopically, they featured benign-appearing polymorphic cells with few division figures arranged in sheets and lobules set in a myxomatous, cartilaginous, osseous, and hyaline fibrous matrix. Cellularity was low to moderate. The tumors eroded bone, one infiltrated between bony trabeculae, and three had soft tissue extension. Complete resection of one tumor was curative; incomplete excision of two tumors resulted in local recurrence (intracranial and fatal) in one and persistence in the other; the fourth tumor remains under observation after biopsy. No tumor metastasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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5/14. Osteochondroma of the tibia and popliteal artery stenosis.

    In our department, an osteochondroma of the tibia in a young girl with intermittent claudication of the right leg was treated. Many instrumental examinations were performed in order to exclude an arterial disorder. As the patient shows signs of arterial compression, an operative procedure to remove the exostosis was performed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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6/14. Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (Nora's lesion): a retrospective study of 12 cases, 2 arising in long bones.

    Twelve cases of bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP), also known as Nora's lesion, are reported. Ten lesions were located in the small bones of the hands, and 2 were located in long bones (femur and proximal tibia). Patient age ranged from 12 to 63 years (average, 30.3 years). radiography of the lesions in the hand bones showed calcific masses attached to the underlying cortex, without interruption of the latter. The long bone lesions revealed unusual findings. In the femur, BPOP presented with extensive cortical destruction and was suggestive of a malignant lesion. This presentation has not been described to date. In the tibia, the lesion was located in the soft tissue without cortical attachment. This type of BPOP probably represents an immature lesion that over time will mature to solid cortical attachment. On histologic examination, all lesions demonstrated 3 distinct components with variable degrees of representation: (1) hypercellular cartilage with calcification and ossification, with the calcified cartilage having a characteristic basophilic tinctorial quality; (2) cancellous bone undergoing maturation; and (3) spindle cell stroma without cytologic atypia. In 1 case with a long-standing history, the cartilaginous component was minimal. BPOP, together with florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis, may represent different stages in the development of a posttraumatic proliferative process. BPOP apparently arises from the periosteal tissues through a process of cartilaginous metaplasia.
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ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
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7/14. The transfibular approach for distal tibial osteochondroma: an alternative technique for excision.

    Surgical excision of osteochondromata occurring at the lateral aspect of the distal tibia is hampered by the difficult access to this area. Current techniques use an anterior approach, but this makes access to the posterior aspect of the tibia difficult. The authors report on 2 cases in which removal, and subsequent replacement of distal fibula and fixation with a semitubular plate, allowed complete excision of a distal tibial osteochondroma and satisfactory outcomes. This procedure provides an alternative technique to the anterior approach previously described. The literature appears to contain no similar previous reports.
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ranking = 7
keywords = tibia
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8/14. Osteoid osteoma simulating an osteocartilaginous exostosis.

    We describe a case of osteoid osteoma in the tibia of a 3-year-old patient who presented with a clinical and radiographic picture that suggested an exostosis. The formation of osteoid osteoma with a radiographic picture similar to that of osteophytes or exostosis has been previously documented only rarely. The authors hypothesize that the exostosis-like formation observed was actually the calcification of soft tissues that formed after the intense periosteal inflammatory reaction caused by the osteoid osteoma. As a result of its peculiar clinical and radiographic presentation, diagnosis of this lesion was delayed. Being located close to the medial growth plate of the tibia, it caused lengthening of the limb with a pronounced valgus deviation of the knee. An excisional biopsy provided histological evidence, clinical resolution and immediate pain relief, but incomplete resolution of the valgus deformity of the knee.
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ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
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9/14. A case report of osteochondroma of the frontotemporosphenoidal suture.

    Osteochondroma, also known as osteocartilaginous exostosis, is the most frequent benign bone tumour of the skeletal system. Despite its preference for long bones (tibia and femur), osteochondroma may occur in some short bones developing endochondral ossification. Seventy-five percent of the patients present only with a single lesion, whereas 25% have multiple lesions; this last clinical condition, defined as osteochondromatosis (disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance) shows a high risk of malignant transformation (about 11%). In the craniofacial area this tumour is very rare. The sites of predilection are the coronoid process and mandibular condyle, even though osteochondromas arising from the base of the skull, maxillary sinus and zygomatic arch have been previously described. However, an osteochondroma originating from the frontotemporosphenoidal suture has not been reported before in the literature. We present a unique case of osteochondroma of the frontotemporosphenoidal suture. Moreover, the relevant international literature has been reviewed and all diagnostic and surgical matters have been discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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10/14. The 'anvil' osteophyte-a primary cause of fixed flexion of the knee?

    Three cases are reported in which clinical presentation was with arthritic symptoms and inability to straighten the knee. An unusually prominent anterior tibial osteophyte, whose shape is remarkably suggestive of a blacksmith's anvil, appeared to be a contributory factor through its apparent impingement with the femoral trochlea at the limit of extension. The osteophyte was radically removed arthroscopically in each case as an isolated gesture, and the patients were followed up with particular emphasis on fixed flexion deformity. At clinical review, after a mean follow-up period of 5.3 years, it was concluded that there had not been a convincing or sustained improvement in knee function, although the fixed flexion deformities had not increased significantly. Our conclusion is that the 'anvil' osteophyte may simply be a part of a more diffuse degenerative process and that it was probably not, in itself, the primary cause of fixed flexion deformity in these cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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