Cases reported "Osteolysis"

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1/108. Ectopic dural osteolytic meningiomas.

    Intracranial meningiomas usually originate from the arachnoidal cells of the internal dural layer: meningiomas that originate from different sites are ectopic. The authors describe the case of a small meningioma adhering to the external dural layer without involvement of the internal layer, accompanied by osteolysis of the internal surface of the skull. A review of the literature on cranial ectopic meningiomas yielded only four cases described as originating from the external dural layer. Osteolysis of the skull was always present and was not found to have prognostic significance. The authors suggest that these four primary ectopic meningiomas originating from the external dural layer should be differentiated from intraosseous meningiomas of the skull.
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keywords = skull
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2/108. Angiomatous osteolysis of the skull vault.

    A case is reported of angiomatous osteolysis of the calvarium. This condition normally affects long bones and there is only one previous report in literature of massive osteolysis of the skull. The clinical, radiological and pathological implications of this condition are considered.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = skull
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3/108. Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty.

    Fracture of the femoral component associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not been well reported before. A 63-year-old man with osteoarthritis of the right knee underwent TKA with a New Jersey LCS knee, with cementing on the tibia and patella but not on the femoral component. After 42 months, in addition to wearing of polyethylene of the tibia and patella, severe osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle was noted. osteonecrosis caused loss of osseous support of the medial flange of the femoral component, and the bone ingrowth of the central and lateral flange to the distal femur was so good that it overcame the yield stress of the metal of the femoral component and caused fracture of the femoral component. The osteolytic area was filled with autogenous iliac bone, and a new femoral component was inserted and cemented. The patient's condition became satisfactory with relief of pain. Although uncommon, fracture of the femoral component does occur associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis.
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ranking = 1.383100384516
keywords = fracture
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4/108. Severe osteoporosis in familial hajdu-cheney syndrome: progression of acro-osteolysis and osteoporosis during long-term follow-up.

    hajdu-cheney syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited osteodysplastic bone disease with the hallmarks of acro-osteolysis, skull deformations, and generalized osteoporosis. Very few patients have been followed long-term with respect to the prognosis of acro-osteolysis and osteoporosis. Here we describe a 39-year-old woman and her 19-year-old daughter who are both affected with the hajdu-cheney syndrome. Skeletal lesions were followed in the mother between the ages of 22 and 39 years. The acro-osteolytic lesions progressed markedly and caused shortening of several fingers; some end phalanges had completely disappeared. Severe spinal osteoporosis with serial vertebral fractures was found at the age of 22 years. New vertebral fractures developed until the age of 33 years, but did not progress afterward. High turnover osteoporosis was found in the bone histology of iliac crest biopsies performed at the ages of 22 and 34 years. Bone mineral content (BMC) was strikingly decreased at the age of 34 years (T score -5.1 SD) and did not significantly change during further follow-up. In the daughter, BMC failed to increase between the ages of 12 and 19 years and was also markedly decreased (T score -4.4 SD). This suggests that osteoporosis in hajdu-cheney syndrome is related to a low peak bone mass and a high bone turnover, leading to insufficient bone formation compared with the increased bone resorption.
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ranking = 1.7164337178493
keywords = fracture, skull
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5/108. Acute periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum associated with osteolytic pelvic lesions: a report of 3 cases.

    Three cases of acute acetabular fracture around uncemented porous-coated acetabular components associated with osteolytic lesions of the pelvis are reported. In each case, the fracture occurred through an area of severe osteolysis that contributed to the structural failure of the pelvis. None of the fractures were associated with significant trauma, and none of the implants demonstrated evidence of loosening before the fracture. When marked pelvic osteolysis develops around the acetabular component of a total hip arthroplasty, the possibility of pelvic fracture must be considered. Total hip arthroplasty patients with osteolysis should be followed with radiographs at regular and frequent intervals. When osteolysis progresses, early intervention should be strongly considered because appropriate treatment may prevent fracture occurrence.
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ranking = 6.9155019225801
keywords = fracture
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6/108. Osteolysis of the pelvis presenting as insufficiency fracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Physician awareness of the risk of osteoporosis and subsequent fractures in a patient with a history of long-term steroid treatment is high. The tendency to assume that a fracture is owing to steroid-induced osteoporosis may result in an unnecessarily intense antiresorptive treatment regimen for a patient who may not have osteoporosis. I report here about a patient with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with bone fracture despite antiresorptive therapy and without evidence of osteoporosis by bone mineral density testing.
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ranking = 4.8408513458061
keywords = fracture
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7/108. Chronic cerebrospinal fluid leak into skull base causing intramedullary osteolysis.

    We present the rare case of a 74-year-old woman with extensive intramedullary osteolysis of the petroclival skull base straddling both sides of the basi-occiput and basi-sphenoid. She presented with clinical features of recurrent spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhoea despite three previous attempts at repair of the CSF leak. Recent advances in imaging techniques enable accurate radiological diagnosis of skull base lesions. We performed T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence MR, and a diffusion scan to study the characteristics of the skull base pathology. This revealed extensive osteolysis, with cystic spaces within the clivus and the petrous pyramid extending also to the basi-occiput. The leak was sealed using the technique of subtotal petrosectomy with obliteration of the eustachian tube and blind pit closure of the ear canal. The patient has been followed up for six months with no recurrence of symptoms.
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ranking = 2.3333333333333
keywords = skull
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8/108. cementoplasty and the oncologic population.

    The first and only description of percutaneous cementoplasty, to date, has been described in the French medical literature in 1994. In this series of 12 cases, radiologists successfully instilled a cement derivative into the acetabulum under fluoroscopic control. As in these cases, the major indication for cementoplasty is to provide pain control and stabilization of an osteolytic lesion. Potential complications include physical or thermal damage to the adjacent neurovascular structures, either during needle positioning or from cement leakage, respectively. Although no absolute contraindications exist, one should proceed cautiously in patients with coagulopathies. Results may be suboptimal as well in patients with pathologic fractures.
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ranking = 0.69155019225801
keywords = fracture
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9/108. Massive osteolysis of the humerus with spontaneous recovery.

    An elderly woman presented with a pathological fracture of the right humerus. Progressive dissolution of the shaft of this bone took place over six months. No cause could be established and the patient refused biopsy. With only simple splintage for treatment the humeral shaft gradually reformed and re-ossified over a period of two years. The patient has been under review for four and a half years and no further pathology has come to light. The cause of the osteolysis remains obscure.
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ranking = 0.69155019225801
keywords = fracture
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10/108. eosinophilic granuloma masquerading as fracture of the orbital roof: case report.

    Orbital involvement of eosinophilic granuloma accounts for less than 1% of all orbital tumors. The most common presenting sign of eosinophilic granuloma is bilateral or unilateral proptosis; rarely, neural parenchyma involvement is observed. This article features a case report of a 16-year-old male patient who presented to the authors after minor trauma that simulated a fracture near the orbital apex. The authors conclude that the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma should be considered if there is unusual location of apparent "fracture," a mass in the region of the fracture, lysis of bone, and recurrence of inflammation after the initial injury has subsided. Timely intervention with appropriate excision, histologic confirmation, and reconstruction with proper follow-up are the cornerstones of therapy for this rare disorder.
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ranking = 4.8408513458061
keywords = fracture
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