Cases reported "Osteolysis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/28. Wear of a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner associated with metallic deposition on a ceramic femoral head.

    A 68-year-old patient underwent revision surgery for recurrent dislocation of a ceramic-on-polyethylene uncemented hip arthroplasty implanted 6 months previously. The aluminum oxide femoral head was found to have titanium deposition measuring 5 by 10 mm in an area articulating with the highly cross-linked polyethylene liner. The liner was observed to possess severe scratching produced by articulation with the titanium deposited on the ceramic head. Despite improved scratch resistance of ceramic-bearing surfaces, irregularities introduced by metallic deposition after recurrent dislocation can damage a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/28. Winchester syndrome caused by a homozygous mutation affecting the active site of matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    The inherited osteolysis syndromes are a heterogeneous group of skeletal disorders whose classification is still uncertain. Three osteolysis syndromes show autosomal recessive inheritance and multicentric involvement: Torg syndrome (OMIM 259600), Winchester syndrome (OMIM 277950) and Nodulosis-Arthropathy-osteolysis syndrome (NAO; OMIM 605156). The 2001 Nosology of the International Skeletal Dysplasia Society (Hall CM, Am J Med Genet 2002: 113: 65) classifies NAO as a variant of Torg syndrome, while Winchester syndrome is considered as a separate disorder. Recently, mutations in the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) gene were identified in affected individuals with a clinical diagnosis of NAO in two Arab families. We report a homozygous missense mutation (E404K) in the active site of MMP2 in a 21-year-old woman with a severe form of osteolysis best compatible with a diagnosis of Winchester syndrome. The clinical and molecular findings suggest that Torg, NAO and Winchester syndromes are allelic disorders that form a clinical spectrum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/28. osteolysis caused by tibial component debonding in total knee arthroplasty.

    Late failure of total knee arthroplasties usually results from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene wear or implant loosening. Early failure from osteolysis is uncommon. However, we treated a patient with a failed total knee arthroplasty from osteolysis that developed 2 years postoperatively. The failure was associated with tibial component debonding from the cement mantle with abundant cement and metal debris. Although there was some third-body debris in the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene insert surface, the insert wear was not extensive. Although abundant cement and metal debris were found in the periarticular soft tissues, no ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene was seen in histologic specimens under polarized light. The osteolysis seems to have been caused primarily by debris generated from debonding and torsional motion at the tibial baseplate-cement interface rather than the bearing surface. Although this failure mechanism has been well recognized in cemented total hip arthroplasties, it has not been reported to be a substantial cause of failure in total knee arthroplasties.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/28. Endosteal erosion in association with stable uncemented femoral components.

    Sixteen cases of patients who had focal femoral osteolysis after total hip replacement without cement were identified. Fourteen of them were included in a retrospective review of 474 consecutive total hip replacements without cement in 441 patients who had been followed for at least two years. The criteria for inclusion in the study were focal osteolysis with a femoral component that appeared stable radiographically, and no subsidence or change of position of the implant. All but two patients were men and were quite active. The average age was forty-seven years (range, twenty to sixty-five years). Fourteen of the sixteen patients had an excellent clinical result (a Harris hip score of 90 points or more). In two patients, the hip replacement was revised and, in a third, a biopsy was done. In all three patients, the implant was found to be firmly fixed to the femur. In the two hips that were revised, extensive ingrowth of bone was demonstrated histologically, there was no evidence of infection, and a well defined fibrous membrane was found around the smooth portion of the stem. The histological specimens from these two hips contained focal aggregates of macrophages with particulate polyethylene and metallic debris. In the biopsy material from the hip that was not revised, a fine fibrous membrane lined a cystic cavity. Although the membrane contained an occasional macrophage, no foreign material was identified. Trabecular microfracture and osteoclastic resorption of bone were seen next to the fibrous lining. With one exception, osteolysis was not identified less than two years postoperatively. In most patients, osteolysis appeared after three years. This study showed that femoral osteolysis can occur around uncemented components.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/28. Aseptic loosening in total hip arthroplasty secondary to osteolysis induced by wear debris from titanium-alloy modular femoral heads.

    Since 1984, we have used components made of titanium alloy for total joint arthroplasty. Recently, two patients needed revision hip arthroplasty, approximately three years after the initial procedure, because of aseptic loosening secondary to severe osteolysis that had been induced by metallic debris. Although implants made of titanium alloy have many favorable qualities--most importantly, superb biocompatibility--the alloy is more susceptible to wear by particles of acrylic cement and tends to generate more polyethylene wear than do components made of stainless steel or chromium-cobalt. A new process of implanting ions has reportedly improved resistance to wear as well as fatigue properties and has enhanced the resistance to corrosion of the implants. Although, to our knowledge, only in vitro studies of this process have been reported to date, we recommend avoiding the use of components made of titanium alloy in which ions have not been implanted. We suggest considering the possibility of osteolysis secondary to appreciable metallic debris in patients who have aseptic loosening of titanium-alloy components that were not implanted with ions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/28. Fractured femoral shaft through an osteolytic lesion resulting from the reaction to a prosthesis. A case report.

    This paper reports a singular case of pathological fracture through a large osteolytic lesion of the mid-femur consequent on reaction to a hip prosthesis. Not only metal particles but also polyethylene fibres were found at this site, some 15 cm from the prosthesis. The case sheds an interesting light on the reaction to prostheses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/28. Catastrophic osteolysis in total knee replacement. A report of 17 cases.

    One hundred eighty-five total knee revisions were done by the 2 senior authors from 1988 to 1994. Of these, 17 patients were identified as having severe osteolysis. The average age was 62.7 years, and the average weight was 90.8 g. All patients had osteoarthritis. Preoperative aspiration was negative in all patients. Eight patients had a metal-backed patella, 8 had a cementless implant, 4 had a cemented implant, and 5 had a hybrid implant. The average time interval from the index surgery to radiographic evidence of lysis was 56 months. Radiographic review showed gross polyethylene wear in 10 patients, loose tibial implants in 8, fractured baseplates in 2, and evidence of a metallic synovitis in 2. Retrieved polyethylene liners had a average thickness of 7 mm, and none were conforming. Osteolytic defects were defined and classified according to Engh's criteria. The histology showed a foreign body reaction with intracellular refractile polyethylene particles. Four cases had metallic debris. The exposure at the time of revision required a rectus snip in 4, V-Y-quadricepsplasty in 2, and tibial tubercle osteotomy in 1. Posterior stabilized implants were used in 65% and a constrained implant in 30%. Lytic defects were reconstructed with cement only in 47% of knees, allograft in 30%, and metallic wedges in 35%. Based on this report, the authors conclude that younger, overweight patients seem to be at higher risk of implant failure and that osteolysis is not restricted to cementless implants. Furthermore, because review of the radiographs leads to a constant underestimation of the lytic defect, the surgeon must be prepared to deal with complex revisions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/28. Fracture of the tibial tray following PCA knee replacement. A report of two cases.

    We report two cases in which fracture of the tibial metal tray was thought to be due to improper design of the tray and heavy polyethylene wear. The bone beneath the fractured portion of the tray was deficient and had been replaced by granulomatous fibrous tissue including numerous polyethylene wear particles and foreign-body giant cells. osteolysis occurred as a tissue reaction to these particles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/28. An osteolytic lesion associated with polyethylene wear debris adjacent to a stable total knee prosthesis.

    Seven years after total knee arthroplasty, a patient with a well-fixed, uncemented femoral component (cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy) developed a large cystic lesion in the distal femur adjacent to the femoral component. This lesion contained fibrotic soft tissue, evidence of a foreign-body giant cell reaction, and a large number of polyethylene particles, but no metal wear debris, infection, or malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/28. Wear debris from bipolar femoral neck-cup impingement. A cause of femoral stem loosening.

    The source of wear debris in total hip arthroplasty may occur at various interfaces: metal-ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene bearings, metal-cement micromotion, bone-cement interfaces, and implant coatings. Wear-induced osteolysis may result in a spectrum of radiographic changes from radiolucent lines to massive osteolysis. Subsequent loosening of the implant may occur and revision may be difficult because of bone deficiencies. Impingement of the femoral neck on the acetabular component may result in polyethylene and/or metal debris, leading to early femoral stem loosening. The five cases presented, involving six hips, illustrate how bipolar cup-stem impingement may result in significant wear-induced femoral osteolysis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.6
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Osteolysis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.