Cases reported "Osteoma, Osteoid"

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1/28. Doppler duplex color localization of osteoid osteomas.

    We present two cases of osteoid osteoma in adolescent boys. The lesions were located in the proximal metaphysis of the right tibia and left femoral diaphysis respectively. Doppler duplex color study demonstrated clearly the highly vascular nidus and its feeding artery in one case and only the feeding artery in the second. We believe these are the first descriptions of osteoid osteomas assessed with Doppler duplex color, which was also used as guidance for the percutaneous localization and biopsy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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2/28. Osteoid osteoma after a stress fracture of the tibia: a case report.

    A 24-year-old man presented with a stress fracture over his left tibia following an infantry training 6 years ago. x-rays of his left tibia revealed a stress fracture and bone scan showed marked tracer uptake at the fracture. He was treated conservatively but his pain persisted since then. Five years later, x-rays and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. The stress fracture may act as a trigger for the formation of osteoid osteoma and caused a delay in diagnosis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
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3/28. Percutaneous CT guided resection of osteoid osteoma of the tibial plafond.

    Osteoid osteomas of the foot and ankle are relatively rare and notoriously difficult to diagnose. Juxta-articular osteoid osteomas are more difficult to treat and often have a significant delay in diagnosis. We report a case of a juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the tibial plafond. Once the diagnosis was made, excisional biopsy was performed percutaneously under computed tomography (CT) guidance as an outpatient in the radiology suite. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms and remains pain free at two years follow-up. CT guided resection can be a lower morbidity and more cost effective technique to treat this lesion than traditional methods.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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4/28. Differentiation of anterior tibial stress fracture from osteoid osteoma.

    The authors present a case in which skeletal scintigraphy helped them to differentiate an anterior tibial stress fracture from a possible osteoid osteoma. Important scintigraphic clues to the correct diagnosis included a linear rather than a round to oval configuration to the focus of intense uptake shown by pinhole imaging, absence of focally increased tracer localization on the angiographic and tissue phases, and a symmetrically positioned, less-conspicuous contralateral abnormality.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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5/28. Osteoid osteoma that occurred in a former fracture site.

    diagnosis of osteoid osteoma often is delayed, despite its high incidence, because of similarities in presenting symptoms with other pathologic entities. The current case report describes a posttraumatic osteoid osteoma. Three years after osteosynthesis of a distal tibial fracture an osteoid osteoma was diagnosed at the former fracture site. After excluding osteomyelitis as a possible diagnosis, the tumor was excised successfully. Based on current knowledge of the pathogenesis of osteoid osteoma, it is unlikely that the lesion observed in the patient was attributable to the previous fracture.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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6/28. Osteoid osteoma presenting with focal neurologic signs.

    Osteoid osteomas are benign bone tumors, most commonly located in the femur or tibia. In young children, these tumors can be extremely difficult to diagnose. They commonly present nonspecifically with gait disturbance and pain and characteristically respond well to mild pain relievers. We report two patients who presented with neurologic signs, including atrophy, weakness, and diminished deep tendon reflexes of the affected limb. These two patients demonstrate that osteoid osteomas of the lower extremities can present with neurologic signs, and proper diagnosis requires a detailed history and clinical awareness of this phenomenon.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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7/28. Osteoid osteoma of the coracoid process.

    Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign, and painful tumor most commonly affecting the extra-articular portions of the long bones, especially the femur or tibia. Osteoid osteoma of the coracoid process is so rare that we have found only three previously reported cases in the international literature. We describe our experience in managing a case of osteoid osteoma in this unusual location.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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8/28. Tibialis spastic varus foot caused by osteoid osteoma of the calcaneus.

    Tibialis spastic varus foot is an extremely rare condition. A 30-year-old man had tibialis spastic varus foot caused by juxtaarticular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneus. The correct diagnosis was delayed because the symptoms were similar to arthritis and the nidus was difficult to detect on plain radiographs. curettage of the tumor was done, and the osseous defect was filled with interporous hydroxyapatite. The pain was relieved immediately after surgery. The varus deformity of the foot and spasm of the tibialis anterior muscle gradually improved. Three years 10 months after surgery, the patient was pain-free and the spasm of the tibialis anterior muscle had disappeared. The varus deformity and motion of the foot improved, but a restricted range of motion remained. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no published descriptions of tibialis spastic varus foot caused by juxtaarticular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneus.
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ranking = 4
keywords = tibia
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9/28. Malignant osteoblastoma versus osteosarcoma: a case report.

    A 33-year-old male developed a slow-growing mass at the anterior aspect of the left tibia for 8 months. The radiologic finding revealed a well-circumscribed osteolytic mass and appeared benign to most radiologists. The lesion was then excised locally. The histology revealed bizarre osteoblasts and osteoclast-like giant cells interspersing in the vascularized stroma and trabeculated osteoids; the periphery of the lesion showed sclerotic mature bones. Malignant osteoblastoma was, therefore, entertained and the patient was treated as such without aggressive surgery and chemotherapy. He has survived for 11 years. However, the diagnosis of malignant osteoblastoma was still a contradiction because of the presence of cartilage foci.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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10/28. Osteoid osteoma simulating an osteocartilaginous exostosis.

    We describe a case of osteoid osteoma in the tibia of a 3-year-old patient who presented with a clinical and radiographic picture that suggested an exostosis. The formation of osteoid osteoma with a radiographic picture similar to that of osteophytes or exostosis has been previously documented only rarely. The authors hypothesize that the exostosis-like formation observed was actually the calcification of soft tissues that formed after the intense periosteal inflammatory reaction caused by the osteoid osteoma. As a result of its peculiar clinical and radiographic presentation, diagnosis of this lesion was delayed. Being located close to the medial growth plate of the tibia, it caused lengthening of the limb with a pronounced valgus deviation of the knee. An excisional biopsy provided histological evidence, clinical resolution and immediate pain relief, but incomplete resolution of the valgus deformity of the knee.
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ranking = 2
keywords = tibia
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