Cases reported "Osteoma"

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1/132. pneumocephalus associated with ethmoidal sinus osteoma--case report.

    A 35-year-old female suffered sudden onset of severe headache upon blowing her nose. No rhinorrhea or signs of meningeal irritation were noted. Computed tomography (CT) with bone windows clearly delineated a bony mass in the right ethmoid sinus, extending into the orbit and intracranially. Conventional CT demonstrated multiple air bubbles in the cisterns and around the mass in the right frontal skull base, suggesting that the mass was associated with entry of the air bubbles into the cranial cavity. T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a low-signal lesion that appeared to be an osteoma but did not show any air bubbles. Through a wide bilateral frontal craniotomy, the cauliflower-like osteoma was found to be protruding intracranially through the skull base and the overlying dura mater. The osteoma was removed, and the dural defect was covered with a fascia graft. Histological examination confirmed that the lesion was an osteoma. The operative procedure resolved the problem of air entry. CT is superior to MR imaging for diagnosing pneumocephalus, by providing a better assessment of bony destruction and better detection of small amounts of intracranial air.
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2/132. Fibro-osseous lesions of the external auditory canal.

    OBJECTIVES: To differentiate a novel type of benign circumscribed bone lesion of the external auditory canal from those described previously, such as exostoses and osteomas. STUDY DESIGN: Information was obtained from computed tomography (CT) images, surgical findings, and pathologic study. methods: Five patients (26 to 82 years old) who presented a hard, round, unilateral, skin-covered mass occluding the external auditory canal to varying degrees were studied. A CT study carried out before resection of the lesions by curettage disclosed the absence of a bony connection to the underlying structures. All the tissue specimens underwent pathologic study. RESULTS: CT and surgical findings demonstrated the absence of a connective pedicle. The pathologic findings showed lesions consisting of an osteoma-like bone formation with sparse osteoblastic areas; mature lamellar bone was observed in three cases, bone marrow containing adipose tissue and hematopoietic remnants in two, and a dense, collagenous stroma in another. They all showed irregular trabeculae, bordered by osteoid osteoblasts. In no case was there evidence of a relationship to the cartilaginous tissue or to the bony structures of the external auditory canal. CONCLUSIONS: The data obtained from the clinical, CT, surgical, and pathologic findings suggest the existence of a lesion unlike those previously known, possibly related to ossifying reactions in other parts of the organism.
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3/132. Unusual radiological appearance of a skull osteoma.

    A 24-year-old woman presented with a 7-week history of headache and left frontal scalp swelling. A plain radiograph and CT demonstrated a 2-cm lytic lesion in the frontal bone which was excised via craniotomy. histology showed this to be an osteoma. Osteomas very rarely, if ever, appear as lytic lesions. The differential and radiological diagnoses are discussed.
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4/132. osteoma of the middle ear.

    Osteomas are benign pedunculated tumours of the lamellar bone, which commonly originates from paranasal sinuses. Within the temporal bone they are seen commonly in the external ear canal. Osteomas originating from the middle ear are very rare. There are only 12 cases reported in the medical literature up to now. Five of those cases caused conductive hearing loss and the others were asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally.
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5/132. Case report: paraarticular soft-tissue osteoma of the hip.

    A case of paraarticular soft-tissue osteoma of the hip is presented. The patient is a 30-year-old white male with a two year history of progressive left hip pain. Plain film and cross-sectional imaging in conjunction with pathologic correlation are used to make the diagnosis. The lesion lacks the typical zoning pattern of myositis ossificans, shows no direct communication with native bone, and is extraarticular in location as opposed to synovial osteochondromatosis. Soft tissue osteomas most commonly occur around the knee, the foot, and the ankle. Soft tissue osteomas are rare tumors and this case is unusual in that it occurs around the hip.
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6/132. Primary bone tumors of the femur presenting with spinal symptoms: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Two case reports of femoral bone lesions simulating lumbar spinal disease are presented. physical examination and case history were strongly suggestive of lumbar spinal pathology. In case 1, surgical resection of a venous hemangioma in the lumbar epidural space was performed but did not relieve pain. In case 2, conservative treatments for a protruded disk were performed for 3 months before an accurate diagnosis was made. After correct diagnoses were made, excision of the femoral tumors brought rapid relief of all abnormal findings in both cases. Compared with other causes of sciatica, femoral bone tumors are rare. However, careful attention should be paid to rule out these lesions if the diagnosis of a lumbar spinal disease is uncertain. Bone scintigraphy seems to be a sensitive diagnostic method to detect extraspinal osseous lesions.
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7/132. First report of a case of osteoma of the larynx.

    Osteomas are common in otolaryngology, as they often involve the skull and facial bones. On rare occasions, these tumors have also been found in the temporal bone and the tongue. Until now, osteomas have not been encountered in the larynx. We describe the case of a patient who came to our institution with hoarseness and dysphagia and who was found to have an osteoma of the larynx. Radiographic imaging, endoscopy, and pathologic classification confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an osteoma of the larynx.
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8/132. Subtotal reconstruction of the orbit after destruction by benign tumour.

    We present five cases of reconstruction of the orbital walls after destruction by tumours. Treatment is based upon wide exposure through a bicoronal scalp incision and immediate reconstruction with autogenous iliac bone grafts. we do not recommend using foreign materials for reconstructing the orbit.
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9/132. Lingual osteoma: case report.

    Lingual osteoma, a rare clinical entity, has been found mainly in the posterior region of tongue. It mostly affects women in their third and fourth decades of life and occurs less frequently in men. We report an unusual case of a 42-year-old male patient who developed a lingual osteoma near the foramen cecum. The patient underwent excision of the tumor mass under local anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative course. Symptoms of the mass effect were noted to resolve after surgical intervention. Histologically, mature lamellar bone with haversian systems was seen. The pathogenesis of this rare tumor is a controversial problem and its nomenclature also remains an issue of debate. Discussion of the controversial pathogenesis of lingual osteoma and a review of the literature on its clinical characteristics are included in this report.
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10/132. Treatment of primary miliary osteoma cutis with incision, curettage, and primary closure.

    BACKGROUND: Primary miliary osteoma cutis is characterized by de novo bone formation in skin without a known associated or pre-existing cutaneous disorder. These lesions often develop on the face and cause cosmetic concern. OBJECTIVE: Multiple treatments have been attempted, including topical and systemic agents and surgical techniques. The ideal treatment modality should be simple and effective with minimal side effects. methods: The technique of scalpel incision over visible lesions, curette extraction of bony fragments, and primary suture repair was used to remove multiple lesions of primary miliary osteoma cutis on the cheeks of an affected patient. RESULTS: This surgical technique resulted in a significant reduction of visible and palpable lesions and a smoother surface contour with minimal scarring. CONCLUSION: This surgical technique offers a simple but effective method for removal of multiple bony fragments in primary miliary osteoma cutis with minimal side effects.
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