Cases reported "Osteomyelitis"

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11/87. rifabutin-associated hypopyon uveitis in human immunodeficiency virus-negative immunocompetent individuals.

    OBJECTIVE: To report the occurrence of rifabutin-associated hypopyon uveitis in human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-negative immunocompetent individuals. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: Three hiv-negative subjects on rifabutin and clarithromycin for mycobacterium avium complex infections with hypopyon uveitis are described. One subject was iatrogenically immunosuppressed because of a prior lung transplant. Two subjects had no known immunosuppressive conditions. INTERVENTION: Topical and regional steroid therapy. Discontinuation of rifabutin was required in two subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: visual acuity, resolution of hypopyon, anterior uveitis, and vitreitis. RESULTS: All subjects had resolution of hypopyon after therapy, two within 24 hours of beginning topical steroids. Vitreitis resolved with the discontinuation of rifabutin in two subjects. Chronic low-grade anterior uveitis and vitreitis were observed in the remaining subject, whose rifabutin dose was lowered but not discontinued because of active mycobacterium avium complex osteomyelitis. CONCLUSIONS: rifabutin-associated uveitis is well described in hiv-positive individuals, but it has been reported only once in an hiv-negative individual. We report two cases of hypopyon uveitis in immunocompetent individuals and one case in an immunosuppressed hiv-negative individual. All three subjects were receiving concurrent rifabutin and clarithromycin. awareness that this entity can occur in hiv negative and nonimmunosuppressed individuals and that it can mimic infectious endophthalmitis may spare the subject from an invasive workup of systemic infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = avium complex, avium, complex
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12/87. Recurrent Mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis associated with a novel dominant interferon gamma receptor mutation.

    Mycobacterium avium causes infections in immunocompromised individuals. Recurrent infection with this organism has been associated with a deletion at the 818 residue of the interferon-gamma receptor (IFN-gammaR). This mutation produces a truncated receptor without an intracytoplasmic tail, resulting in diminished signaling. We describe a substitution at the 832 residue of the IFN-gammaR causing a similar truncated receptor in a 7-year-old girl with recurrent M avium osteomyelitis.
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ranking = 0.67013045391127
keywords = avium
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13/87. Cutaneous botryomycosis of the cervicofacial region.

    BACKGROUND: Botryomycosis is a rare, chronic, bacterial infection of insidious onset involving the integument or viscera that often mimics actinomycosis or a deep fungal infection. The pathogenesis is thought to be a symbiotic relationship between the host and the infecting organism. methods: Case report of a patient with a chronic infection involving the cervicofacial region diagnosed as cutaneous botryomycosis arising from a chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible. The diagnosis was based on the chronicity of the infection along with the identification of botryomycotic (bacteria-containing) granules on histopathologic examination. Special stains excluded fungi and mycobacterium. Cultures identified the offending bacteria, and antibiotic therapy was initiated on the basis of the sensitivities, resulting in resolution of this chronic infectious process. A review of the English language literature revealed that this is the first case of cutaneous botryomycosis arising from a chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible. RESULTS: Medical therapy proved curative at 14 months follow-up. Surgery was performed for diagnostic purposes only. CONCLUSIONS: Botryomycosis is exceedingly rare in the head and neck, and consideration of this entity in the differential diagnosis is critical to the diagnosis. The mainstay of therapy is medical with surgery reserved for biopsy and/or excision of persistent disease. Published 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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ranking = 9.6772024808976
keywords = mycobacterium
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14/87. Multifocal osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with a genetic defect of the interferon-gamma receptor.

    We describe three patients with multifocal osteomyelitis caused by Mycobacterium avium and a family history of one or more first degree family members diagnosed with various clinical presentations of infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria. There was a significant delay in the diagnosis and they had a protracted course of their illness, which responded only slowly to prolonged multi-drug treatment. In one patient, additional treatment with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was necessary. macrophages of these patients had decreased in vitro responsiveness to IFN-gamma. Genomic sequencing revealed that these patients and their affected family members were heterozygous for a previously described dominant negative mutation in the gene encoding the IFN-gamma binding receptor-1 chain. The clinical presentations of the infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria in these families, with spread limited to skin, bone and lymph nodes, is discussed in the light of the immune mechanisms that are responsible for the clearance of otherwise poorly pathogenic environmental mycobacteria.
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ranking = 0.11168840898521
keywords = avium
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15/87. Bone scintigraphy in mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis: a case report.

    A 30-year-old woman who had a destructive mycobacterium avium complex infection in the left inguinal fossa affecting the pubic bone underwent three-phase bone scanning to identify other possibly affected sites. Multiple skeletal lesions were seen scattered throughout the vertebral column, sternum, and pelvis. This case is presented to describe a rare extensive metastatic M. avium complex infection in an immunocompromised patient.
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ranking = 49.342914774763
keywords = mycobacterium, mycobacterium avium, avium complex, avium, complex
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16/87. Localized osteomyelitis due to mycobacterium avium complex in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    We describe 3 patients who developed atypical manifestations of mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection >10 months (range, 3-16 months) after attaining sustained CD4( ) T cell counts of >100 cells/microL while receiving antiretroviral therapy and not receiving MAC prophylaxis. The common features of these cases include the degree of immune reconstitution, the unusual locations of the infections, and the absence of a systemic inflammatory response. The low rate of these unusual MAC infections does not warrant continuation of primary or secondary prophylaxis after presumed immune reconstitution.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = avium complex, avium, complex
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17/87. Atypical mycobacterial osteomyelitis in a non-AIDS patient.

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium intercellulare (MAI) infection is rare in non-AIDS patients. We report a 60-year-old woman with chronic lung disease who developed vertebral osteomyelitis due to MAI. She was treated successfully with combined therapy consisting of rifampin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin.
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ranking = 0.11168840898521
keywords = avium
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18/87. Multimodality imaging for precise localization of craniofacial osteomyelitis.

    Functional imaging identifies areas of abnormal bone turnover, providing a useful adjunct in the treatment of osteomyelitis and bone tumors. The low resolution and lack of anatomical detail limit the application of bone scans in craniofacial surgery, however. Multimodality image registration addresses this problem by fusing functional images (single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) to high-resolution structural images (computed tomography [CT]) for precise anatomical delineation of bone activity. This article describes a technique for spatial registration of CT and SPECT images to provide precise anatomical delineation of abnormal bone turnover, thereby guiding the extent of resection in the management of craniofacial osteomyelitis. Standard CT and SPECT imaging protocols were used in imaging the skull from the vertex to the mentum. Image data were imported into Analyze (Biomedical Imaging Resource; Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN) on a dedicated Windows NT (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) workstation. Using the CT data, the craniofacial skeleton, osteotomy segments, and bone grafts were interactively mapped out. Consecutive axial slices were then reconstructed to form a three-dimensional volume of interest. The CT-derived volume of interest was registered to the technetium Tc 99m-methylene diphosphonate SPECT scan using the Analyze program to provide a fused multimodality image. The imaging technique was used to localize osteomyelitis in a complex craniofacial reconstruction. The fused images guided the extent of resection during surgery, and postoperative microbiological and histological testing confirmed the diagnosis. Multimodality image registration provides a readily available method to relate facial skeletal anatomy and physiology. This technique is valuable in planning and monitoring therapeutic interventions in clinical conditions in which bone turnover is abnormal.
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ranking = 0.0027865780977373
keywords = complex
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19/87. Group A streptococcal osteomyelitis: severe presentation and course.

    AIM: To evaluate the course of group A streptococcal osteomyelitis associated with severe disease nowadays. methods: Three consecutive cases of severe group A streptococcal disease with osteomyelitis in children that were documented in beer Sheva, israel are described in detail. RESULTS: Two of the three cases were postvaricella. Early in the course of the disease, the presentation resembled that of severe cellulitis. All three patients had severe osteomyelitis and required surgery, and one patient developed chronic osteomyelitis. sepsis was diagnosed in two cases. CONCLUSION: Our cases are distinguishable from typical haematogenous staphylococcal osteomyelitis by the severe course and the extensive involvement of bone and soft tissues. The increase in severity of invasive group A streptococcal infections documented throughout the world could account for the difference between our complex cases and the previous reports.
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ranking = 0.0027865780977373
keywords = complex
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20/87. Primary chronic osteomyelitis in childhood and adolescence: a retrospective analysis of 11 cases and review of the literature.

    PURPOSE: Primary chronic osteomyelitis (PCO) of the jaw is a rare, nonsuppurative, chronic inflammation of an unknown cause. The disease is not age specific. So far, only case reports of this disease with an onset in childhood or adolescence have been described. patients AND methods: review of the patient data of our department from the past 30 years revealed 11 patients with an early onset of PCO in childhood and during puberty. RESULTS: Demographic data, clinical course, radiologic and histologic examinations, and treatment modalities are described and compared with the literature with special emphasis on the somewhat confusing terminology used for this pathology. CONCLUSION: We present a group of 11 patients with an early onset of PCO of the mandible, which, to our knowledge, is the largest described series to date. The series shows the complexity of this disease in a young patient population, demanding a careful evaluation of each case before initiation of therapy.
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ranking = 0.0027865780977373
keywords = complex
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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