Cases reported "Osteomyelitis"

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1/44. ochrobactrum anthropi bacteremia.

    ochrobactrum anthropi (O. anthropi ), formerly known as achromobacter CDC group Vd, is a gram-negative bacillus that is aerobic, oxidase producing, and nonlactose fermenting. This organism has been found in environmental and hospital water sources and has pathogenic potential in humans. Most reports in the literature of O. anthropi bacteremia are associated with intravenous line infections. We describe a case of bacteremia with O. anthropi in a 33-month-old boy with acute osteomyelitis. O. anthropi bacteremia also has been reported in immunocompromised hosts. Rarely, O. anthropi has been a cause of soft tissue or bone infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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2/44. Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex infection presenting as osteomyelitis in a normal host.

    Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection presenting as a painful lytic femur lesion with associated fever, night sweats and weight loss occurred in a 45-y-old woman with apparent normal immune function. Surgical drainage and 24 months of medical therapy resulted in a cure.
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ranking = 33.050306827849
keywords = mycobacterium
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3/44. mycobacterium bovis BCG causing vertebral osteomyelitis (Pott's disease) following intravesical BCG therapy.

    We report a case of mycobacterium bovis BCG vertebral osteomyelitis in a 79-year-old man 2.5 years after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer. The recovered isolate resembled M. tuberculosis biochemically, but resistance to pyrazinamide (PZA) rendered that diagnosis suspect. High-pressure liquid chromatographic studies confirmed the diagnosis of M. bovis BCG infection. The patient was originally started on a four-drug antituberculous regimen of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and PZA. When susceptibility studies were reported, the regimen was changed to isoniazid and rifampin for 12 months. Subsequently, the patient was transferred to a skilled nursing facility for 3 months, where he underwent intensive physical therapy. Although extravesical adverse reactions are rare, clinicians and clinical microbiologists need to be aware of the possibility of disseminated infection by M. bovis BCG in the appropriate setting of clinical history, physical examination, and laboratory investigation.
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ranking = 4.4650535484327
keywords = bovis
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4/44. haemophilus aphrophilus osteomyelitis after dental prophylaxis. A case report.

    A 36-year-old patient who was otherwise healthy had acute osteomyelitis of the humeral shaft develop after routine prophylactic dental cleaning and ultrasonic scaling. haemophilus aphrophilus grew on cultures of material obtained during biopsy of the humerus, and pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis. haemophilus aphrophilus, a fastidious gram negative bacillus, is part of the normal oral flora and is a rare pathogen. osteomyelitis caused by haemophilus aphrophilus has not been reported to occur after routine dental prophylaxis. The patient was treated successfully with surgical debridement and appropriate antibiotics.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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5/44. bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis due to streptococcus bovis.

    The diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis is easily missed, especially in the elderly in whom clinical signs of bacteremia might not be manifest. Spontaneously occurring disc-space infection in adults often has an insidious presentation. The infecting microorganism can be difficult to identify. Although discitis due to streptococcus bovis is occasionally found, it is often difficult to fully confirm the diagnosis. Here, a case of vertebral osteomyelitis due to this microorganism is reported.
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ranking = 3.1893239631662
keywords = bovis
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6/44. Granulomatous osteomyelitis of the sternum presenting with a parasternal mass: a possible relation to the bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine.

    Because they are frequently malignant, swellings of the chest wall during infancy are alarming lesions. Sternal osteomyelitis is a rare condition that may present with a chest wall mass locating in the parasternal region. A parasternal mass of granulomatous osteomyelitic origin is an extremely rare cause with only few case being reported to date. Herein, the authors report on 2 infants presenting with parasternal masses of sternal granulomatous osteomyelitic origin and discuss the possible etiologic role of the bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bacillus
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7/44. Sternal osteomyelitis caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis: case report and review of the literature.

    Sternal osteomyelitis caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis is rare; since the advent of modern antituberculous therapy, a limited number of detailed cases have been reported. Most patients were relatively young, free of underlying disease, and lived in a country in which tuberculosis is endemic. The disease presented indolently with sternal pain and swelling. Extrasternal disease is detectable in less than half. diagnosis was based on histologic examination of infected tissues and mycobacterial cultures. Most patients recovered after surgical debridement and combination drug therapy. Tuberculous sternal osteomyelitis should be considered in patients with sternal pain and swelling.
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ranking = 33.050306827849
keywords = mycobacterium
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8/44. Successful treatment of mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis and arthritis in a non-immunocompromised child.

    In non-immunocompromised children, infections with mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are rare, except for cervical lymphadenitis. We report here a 34-month-old boy who developed osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to MAC. No findings could be revealed for immunodeficiency. He was treated successfully for 12 months with combined therapy consisting of clarithromycin, rifabutin and protionamid.
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ranking = 41.312883534811
keywords = mycobacterium
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9/44. A case of mycobacterium scrofulaceum osteomyelitis of the right wrist.

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the case report is to highlight the possibility of osteomyelitis caused by atypical mycobacteria. Such an infection may simulate tuberculous bone infection and yet fail to respond to standard anti-tuberculous drug therapy. CLINICAL PICTURE: A 66-year-old man who suffered from diabetes mellitus presented with osteomyelitis of the right wrist, with extensive synovial swellings of the flexor tendon sheaths. The clinical features, radiological appearances and histology suggested a tuberculous infection, but subsequent culture grew an atypical mycobacterium, mycobacterium scrofulaceum. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME: There was good clinical improvement and control of the infection with a regime of kanamycin, ethambutol and ethionamide to which the organism was sensitive. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the need to be aware of the possibility of infection with atypical mycobacteria in cases of suspected tuberculosis of the skeletal system which fail to respond to standard treatment.
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ranking = 8.2625767069621
keywords = mycobacterium
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10/44. A point mutation in a domain of gamma interferon receptor 1 provokes severe immunodeficiency.

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the cellular responses induced by it are essential for controlling mycobacterial infections. Most patients bearing an IFN-gamma receptor ligand-binding chain (IFN-gammaR1) deficiency present gross mutations that truncate the protein and prevent its expression, giving rise to severe mycobacterial infections and, frequently, a fatal outcome. In this report a new mutation that affects the IFN-gammaR1 ligand-binding domain in a Spanish patient with mycobacterial disseminated infection and multifocal osteomyelitis is characterized. The mutation generates an amino acid change that does not abrogate protein expression on the cellular surface but that severely impairs responses after the binding of IFN-gamma (CD64 and HLA class II induction and tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12 production). A patient's younger brother, who was also probably homozygous for the mutation, died from meningitis due to mycobacterium bovis. These findings suggest that a point mutation may be fatal when it affects functionally important domains of the receptor and that the severity is not directly related to a lack of IFN-gamma receptor expression. Future research on these nontruncating mutations will make it possible to develop new therapeutical alternatives in this group of patients.
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ranking = 0.63786479263325
keywords = bovis
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