Cases reported "Osteomyelitis"

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1/72. Myelopathy secondary to spinal epidural abscess: case reports and a review.

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease with an unknown incidence rate. This paper will illustrate that early diagnosis and rehabilitation may result in improved outcomes for patients with neck or back pain presenting with neurological deficits. Three cases of SEA in individuals without the commonly acknowledged risk factors of intravenous drug abuse (IVDA), invasive procedures, or immunosuppression were seen at our institution during a 10-month period between October 1995 and July 1996. The patients presented with neck or thoracic back pain and progressive neurological deficits without a febrile illness. Predisposing factors were thought to be urinary tract infection with underlying untreated diabetes mellitus in the first case, a history of recurrent skin infection in the second, and alcoholism without a definite source of infection in the third. leukocytosis, elevated sedimentation rate, and confirmatory findings reported on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of SEA in all three cases. Immediate surgical drainage and decompression followed by proper antibiotic treatment and early aggressive rehabilitation led to good functional outcomes. All the individuals became independent in activities of daily living, wheelchair mobility, and bowel and bladder management. Two eventually became ambulatory.
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2/72. Facial pressure sore complicated by mandibular osteomyelitis.

    A case is reported of an 85-year-old woman with mandibular osteomyelitis secondary to a submental pressure sore. The main aetiological factors in the development of the pressure sore were dementia and severe senile kyphosis. pressure sores are rare in the head and neck region and, though osteomyelitis is a common complication at other anatomical sites, it has not been previously reported in the mandible.
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3/72. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis with sternocostoclavicular osteomyelitis and partial thoracic empyema: report of a case.

    We present herein the case of a 50-year-old woman in whom descending necrotizing mediastinitis originating from an anterior neck abscess spread to the left upper bony thorax, resulting in osteomyelitis of the left sternocostoclavicular articulation and left partial thoracic empyema. Transcervical mediastinal irrigation and drainage was performed with aggressive antibiotic therapy, followed by resection of the left sternocostoclavicular joint and debridement of the anterior mediastinum. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and her left arm and shoulder mobility was well preserved.
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4/72. eikenella corrodens vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to direct inoculation: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVE: To present a unique method of inoculation with an unusual bacterial organism, eikenella corrodens, which led to vertebral osteomyelitis and to heighten awareness of different bacterial organisms that may cause orthopedic infections. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: E. corrodens has been known to cause orthopedic infections for more than 20 years. The usual mechanism is from "Fight bite" injuries to the hand or metacarpal phalangeal joint. Eikenella osteomyelitis of the vertebral body is extremely rare. methods: A 65-year-old man from indonesia developed slowly progressive vertebral collapse and worsening neck pain. history suggested a previous pharyngeal injury while eating fish. work up for malignancy was negative, and imaging studies were suggestive of osteomyelitis. An open biopsy and culture as well as fusion were performed for treatment of the osteomyelitis. RESULTS: After a complete work up was undertaken, cultures grew out E. corrodens as the causative organism of this patient's osteomyelitis. Computed tomography scan and history were consistent with inoculation of the paravertebral space with E. corrodens secondary to a fish bone transgressing the patient's pharynx. The patient was treated with surgery and the appropriate antibiotics and healed without any significant sequela. CONCLUSION: Vertebral osteomyelitis due to E. corrodens is extremely rare. Direct inoculation as a cause of vertebral osteomyelitis with Eikenella has never been reported. If diagnosed properly with appropriate cultures and antibiotic sensitivities, Eikenella osteomyelitis can be treated successfully according to standard orthopedic practices including debridement, fusion, and appropriate antibiotics. awareness of unusual bacteria as potential causative organisms of osteomyelitis is imperative for appropriate treatment.
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5/72. Diagnostic pitfalls in osteomyelitis of the odontoid process: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Pyogenic osteomyelitis of the odontoid process is a very rare disease associated with a variety of clinical symptoms, and previous reports have stressed the difficulties inherent in making the diagnosis. The authors present a case of osteomyelitis of the odontoid process with epidural abscess in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used in the diagnosis, assessment of the extent of concomitant epidural abscess, treatment effect, and long-term follow-up.CASE DESCRIPTION: A 68-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with cervical pain, neck stiffness, and fever. Although the diagnosis was missed at the beginning, the patient was diagnosed with osteomyelitis of the odontoid process with a paravertebral epidural abscess by MRI. The patient became asymptomatic after 3 months of antibiotic therapy.CONCLUSION: Pyogenic osteomyelitis of the odontoid process is a rare condition requiring a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. MRI examination should be considered in the diagnosis in patients with neck pain combined with fever. Serial MRI during and after antibiotic therapy provided an objective assessment of the healing rate of the lesions.
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6/72. Neonatal cervical osteomyelitis with paraspinal abscess and Erb's palsy. A case report and brief review of the literature.

    An unusual case of pyogenic cervical osteomyelitis is reported in a newborn who immediately after birth had no movements in the left shoulder. There was a fullness in the left cervical region. Left Erb's palsy due to an unrecognized birth trauma was diagnosed in a peripheral hospital. Later, the child developed fever and a significant swelling in the left cervical region. On transfer to our institution, the x-rays of the cervical spine, ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) established the diagnosis of C(6) cervical osteomyelitis and paraspinal abscess which extended to the posterior triangle of the neck. The abscess was drained, and the lamina and lateral mass of the C(6) vertebra were debrided. staphylococcus aureus was grown from the pus. The patient was put on long-term antibiotics to which he responded very well, and he became asymptomatic. In the immediate post-operative period, some movements at the left shoulder were noted, and at 6-month follow-up in the out-patient clinic, the child was virtually normal with near-complete regeneration of the C(6) lamina and lateral mass.
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7/72. It could only happen to a doctor--haemophilus aphrophilus septicaemia complicated by a prevertebral infection after dental work.

    A 53 year old man presented with severe neck pain and a flu-like illness; he had recently returned from sri lanka and had had dental treatment six days before illness onset. blood culture showed infection by haemophilus aphrophilus. magnetic resonance imaging was performed and exploratory surgery undertaken. The prevertebral cervical fascia was inflamed but no abscess identified. He was treated with antibiotics and made an uneventful recovery.
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8/72. Cutaneous botryomycosis of the cervicofacial region.

    BACKGROUND: Botryomycosis is a rare, chronic, bacterial infection of insidious onset involving the integument or viscera that often mimics actinomycosis or a deep fungal infection. The pathogenesis is thought to be a symbiotic relationship between the host and the infecting organism. methods: Case report of a patient with a chronic infection involving the cervicofacial region diagnosed as cutaneous botryomycosis arising from a chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible. The diagnosis was based on the chronicity of the infection along with the identification of botryomycotic (bacteria-containing) granules on histopathologic examination. Special stains excluded fungi and mycobacterium. Cultures identified the offending bacteria, and antibiotic therapy was initiated on the basis of the sensitivities, resulting in resolution of this chronic infectious process. A review of the English language literature revealed that this is the first case of cutaneous botryomycosis arising from a chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible. RESULTS: Medical therapy proved curative at 14 months follow-up. Surgery was performed for diagnostic purposes only. CONCLUSIONS: Botryomycosis is exceedingly rare in the head and neck, and consideration of this entity in the differential diagnosis is critical to the diagnosis. The mainstay of therapy is medical with surgery reserved for biopsy and/or excision of persistent disease. Published 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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9/72. candida vertebral osteomyelitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    candida species are low virulence organisms which inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of most individuals. There has been increasing incidence of disseminated and deep-seated candida infections owing to the increasing number of immune compromised hosts. However, the candida species are still rarely suggested as causative pathogens of vertebral osteomyelitis. We present a 51-year-old man with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Three months prior to visiting our hospital, he had undergone a urological operation which was complicated by a urinary tract infection. magnetic resonance imaging and x-rays showed erosion of the body of the 5th cervical spine and collapse of the C5-C6 disc. After open debridement, tissue pathology results revealed candida infection. Clinical stability was achieved during the 6-month follow-up period with a combination of amphotericin b and posterior fixation method. We reviewed the literature and found a high rate of surgical intervention for patients suggested of having candida vertebral osteomyelitis. However, the surgical intervention may not be necessary. early diagnosis using noninvasive percutaneous needle biopsy may help reduce the incidence of delayed treatment.
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10/72. osteomyelitis complicating osteopetrosis--a case report.

    osteomyelitis of the jaws is uncommon but can be a complication of extraction or exposure of teeth in patients who are immunosuppressed or have undergone radiotherapy to the head and neck region. We report a case of osteomyelitis in a patient who has osteopetrosis. The initial clinical presentation was that of an infected retained root, secondary to denture trauma to the supporting tissues. Radiological interpretation was difficult owing to the increased bone density and surgical exploration revealed only a dense region of necrotic bone.
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