Cases reported "Osteomyelitis"

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1/33. flatfoot and calcaneal deformity secondary to osteomyelitis after neonatal heel puncture.

    Deformity of the calcaneus was observed in three patients who developed osteomyelitis after neonatal heel puncture for newborn blood studies. Septic involvement of the calcaneal apophysis may produce an abnormal and early closure of this growth plate. Progressive deformity of the calcaneus, despite appropriate treatment, develops into an asymptomatic flatfoot. A strictly aseptic technique is mandatory for neonatal puncture of the heel to avoid this unusual complication. An infectious cause of flatfoot is proposed in this report.
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2/33. osteomyelitis of the clavicle. A case report.

    osteomyelitis of the clavicle is a rare complication of subclavian vein catheterization. The authors report the case of a patient with osteomyelitis in the right clavicle after subclavian venipuncture.
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3/33. Tale of a toothpick: eikenella corrodens osteomyelitis.

    Tale of a Toothpick is a case of eikenella corrodens osteomyelitis in a young woman, that resulted from puncture of her foot with a toothpick. The epidemiology, microbiology, common clinical presentations and therapy of E. corrodens are reviewed. A brief summary of the extent of toothpick injuries and their infectious complications are also presented.
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4/33. rubber foreign bodies in puncture wounds of the foot in patients wearing rubber-soled shoes.

    We report 8 cases of puncture wound of the foot associated with rubber foreign bodies in patients who were wearing rubber-soled shoes. The difficulty in making the correct diagnosis and the complications arising from these injuries are reviewed. The morbidity associated with these seemingly innocuous puncture wounds can be serious. Infective complications resolved only with removal of all imbedded rubber foreign bodies. A history of wearing rubber-soled shoes during the injury and a high index of suspicion may prevent complications.
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5/33. Radial osteomyelitis as a complication of venous cannulation.

    Venepuncture of the superficial veins in the forearm is considered a relatively safe procedure. We report two patients who presented with osteomyelitis of the proximal radius following venous cannulation of the median cubital vein, and one patient who developed osteomyelitis of the distal radius after cannulation of the cephalic vein. osteomyelitis developing in proximity to a venepuncture site should raise the suspicion that a pathogen causing superficial thrombophlebitis has spread through the deep veins of the arm into the adjacent bone, thus causing osteomyelitis.
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6/33. osteomyelitis at the injection site of adrenalin through an intraosseous needle in a 3-month-old infant.

    Intraosseous (IO) puncture is considered for the administration of drugs and fluids when vascular access cannot be achieved rapidly. Adrenaline/epinephrine, adenosine, crystalloids, colloids and blood products can be applied and administered effectively using this route during resuscitation of children. This technique is relatively simple with complications of <1%. These may include tibial fracture, lower extremity compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis. A case is described in which a 3-month-old male infant presented for emergency resuscitation requiring IO infusion utilising both tibial bones. High doses of adrenaline (1:1000; 0.1 mg/kg) were administered in the right tibial epiphysis only after the standard initial concentration (1:10000; 0.01 mg/kg) had minimal effect. A local inflammatory reaction was noted 24 h later in the right tibial region, which developed into cutaneous necrosis, and was eventually resected. Radiologically, no osseous lesion could be demonstrated, however, a bone scintigram revealed osteomyelitis. Upon surgical revision, purulent destruction was evident requiring removal of the epiphysis and part of the metaphysis. Although osteomyelitis is a rare complication which may be caused by sepsis, or contamination during insertion, we speculate that adrenaline in high concentrations may promote the development of osteomyelitis and the drug should be applied cautiously in more diluted concentrations.
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7/33. osteomyelitis following puncture wounds of the foot in children.

    review of the laboratory and clinical findings and treatment of eight patients with osteomyelitis of the foot after puncture wounds revealed that: 1) osteomyelitis after puncture wounds is a infrequent but potentially serious complication, with significant morbidity; 2) osteomyelitis is frequently preceded by inadequate primary care for simple puncture wounds, and when treatment is appropriate, osteomyelitis usually can be avoided; 3) P. aeruginosa is the most commonly recovered organism; 4) the clinical presentation is characterized by a lack of systemic toxicity, paucity of laboratory abnormalities, and evidence of a localized infection process and the patient may be asymptomatic for a few days to several months after the injury before presentation of the osteomyelitis; and 5) once the infection has become established, treatment must be aggressive, including surgical debridement.
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8/33. Recurrent arthritis as presenting symptom of osteomyelitis.

    We present a patient who had one episode of prepatellar bursitis and subsequently several episodes of arthritis of his right knee. Cultures of several punctures of his knee remained sterile, but the patient had been taking oral antibiotics on each of these occasions against our medical advice. Ultimately a diagnostic puncture revealed growth of staphylococcus aureus. An X-ray demonstrated an osteolytic lesion of the patella, but no defect in the articular surface of the patella could be visualised. MRI demonstrated a communication between the osteomyelitic focus through the medial retinaculum to the bursa suprapatellaris and the knee joint. osteomyelitis of the patella is mainly a disease of childhood. This case is, to our knowledge, the first report on the association between bursitis, osteomyelitis of the patella and recurrent septic arthritis of the knee in an adult. The literature is reviewed and discussed briefly.
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9/33. A case of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome after peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line insertion.

    Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. patients often present initially with acute pain in the proximal forearm, lasting several hours to days. The pain subsides, to be followed by paresis or total paralysis of the pronator quadratus, flexor pollicis longus and the radial half of the flexor profundus, either individually or together. patients with a complete lesion will have a characteristic pinch deformity. We report a case of anterior interosseous syndrome in a 42-year-old male. The patient was admitted initially for chronic osteomyelitis of the left calcaneum. He had a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line inserted into a brachial vein for the administration of intravenous antibiotics, and developed anterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of this procedure. The catheter was subsequently removed and a new line was placed on the other side, and his neurological deficit has been improving since. This case highlights the potential hazards of venupuncture or arterial puncture of the brachial vein or artery respectively, even under controlled conditions with the benefit of ultrasound guidance. It also serves as a reminder to look out for the complications of these common procedures, and to be able to react appropriately when they arise.
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10/33. association of pyoderma gangrenosum and sterile osteomyelitis in a patient having myelodysplastic syndrome with der(1;7)(q10;q10).

    Neutrophilic dermatoses such as Sweet's disease and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are occasionally associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We present here a 67-yr-old male having PG and sterile osteomyelitis in association with underlying MDS (refractory anemia) and Crohn's disease. To establish the diagnosis of MDS, sternal bone marrow puncture was performed, which showed chromosomal abnormality containing der(1;7)(q10;q10). After the puncture, he suffered from gradually progressive skin ulceration, flare, and bone pain. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sternum showed severe inflammation in the sternum and the overlying subcutaneous tissue. All of the cultures obtained from the wound were negative for both bacteria and fungus. biopsy was performed from the antero-sternal skin lesion, which showed epidermal ulceration with prominent infiltration of neutrophils. He was thus diagnosed as having PG and sterile osteomyelitis, and was treated with prednisolone, which completely resolved the symptoms. We consider that the bone marrow aspiration in the present patient provoked PG and sterile osteomyelitis. As was previously reported by others, certain chromosomal abnormalities in MDS may be related with the development of neutrophilic dermatoses.
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