Cases reported "Osteoporosis"

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11/352. The 4A syndrome association with osteoporosis.

    4A syndrome is characterised by adrenocortical insufficiency, achalasia, alacrima, autonomic and other neurological abnormalities. We report an 18-year-old boy with 4 A syndrome and having all classical features of the disease including sensorimotor neuropathy. In addition, the patient had low aldosterone levels and signs of osteoporosis, which apparently developed without glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Although it is speculated that the lack of local growth factors, nutritional deficiency secondary to achalasia or receptor abnormalities regarding bone metabolism contribute to osteoporosis, its etiopathogenesis still needs to be clarified.
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12/352. Severe complications of ulcerative colitis after high-dose prednisolone and azathioprine treatment.

    We report a rare case of ulcerative colitis (UC) associated with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in multiple organs, and with compressive fracture from osteoporosis after the administration of high-dose prednisolone and azathioprine. A 25-year-old man had been treated with high-dose prednisolone for UC. He suddenly experienced severe lumbago, which prevented him from walking. Plain X-ray demonstrated compressive fractures of the thoracic and the lumbar vertebrae, which were thought to be due to osteoporosis as a side effect of the high-dose prednisolone. At this admission, in another hospital, he also had a bloody discharge from the rectum, and azathioprine was started; however, the patient's condition still did not show any improvement. The total doses of azathioprine and prednisolone he had received were 3150 mg and more than 15,000 mg, respectively. Considering the presence of the serious complications, surgical intervention was the treatment selected. culture study revealed MRSA in the feces and nasal cavity, and P. aeruginosa in the feces and urine. vancomycin hydrochloride and gentamicin were administered, and were effective, with a subsequent negative culture study. Subtotal colectomy with mucus fistula was performed. After the operation, culture studies remained negative. Major steroid side effects such as bone fracture and osteoporosis should be considered as an indication for surgery in UC patients. MRSA and P. aeruginosa are a menace, especially for UC immunosuppressed patients on steroid or immunosuppressive therapy. When these bacteria are detected, there should be prompt and adequate antimicrobial therapy against the organisms and the immunosuppressive therapy should be immediately discontinued. We conclude that surgical therapy should be considered in the earlier stage for patients with intractable UC, rather than continuing long-term administration of steroid or azathioprine, which may lead to serious complications.
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keywords = bone
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13/352. Partial transient osteoporosis of the hand.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the radiographic and scintigraphic findings of partial transient osteoporosis (PTO) of the hand. To discuss the relationship of PTO and other localized demineralizing diseases. DESIGN AND patients: Three patients with PTO that affected two or three digits of the hand are reported. Two patients were middle-aged women and the third was a young man. All presented with a history of trauma to the hand. All patients experienced localized burning pain, swelling and vasomotor changes including redness of the skin, hyperhidrosis and signs of vasomotor instability of the involved fingers. Plain radiography and bone scanning were used in the diagnosis and follow-up of these cases. RESULTS: All patients had a radial distribution of the osteoporosis that involved adjacent rays. In all patients two rays were involved. The radiographic changes manifested as minimal patchy osteoporosis involving the cortical, cancellous, subarticular and subperiosteal bone with no articular involvement. The increased uptake on scintigraphy coincided with the radial distribution of the osteoporosis. All patients improved on physical therapy and were symptom-free approximately 6 months after the initial injury. These patients were followed up for more than 2 years. CONCLUSION: PTO of the hand is an uncommon disease with typical clinical and radiographic findings. Bone scintigraphy confirms the partial involvement of the hand.
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keywords = bone
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14/352. Treatment of a patient with severe osteoporosis and chronic polyarthritis with fixed implant-supported prosthesis: a case report.

    This article reports the treatment and 5-year follow-up of an 80-year-old female with a history of severe osteoporosis and chronic polyarthritis. Treatment included methotrixate disodium and acemetacin. After the last tooth was removed from the mandible, the patient was successfully treated with a fixed mandibular prosthesis supported by 6 implants placed between the mental foramina. The implants have remained osseointegrated, and peri-implant smears have been negative for bacterial colonization. Radiographic follow-up examination has revealed bone loss that is slightly greater than expected. This article focuses on the placement of implants in a patient receiving medication for chronic polyarthritis and osteoporosis.
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15/352. Estrogen supplementation for bone dematuration in young epileptic man treated with anticonvulsant therapy; a case report.

    We encountered a young man treated with anticonvulsant therapy who had greatly reduced bone mineral density. An 18-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for shoulder pain and further evaluation of decreased bone mineral density. He had been treated with anticonvulsants, including phenytoin, phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide for seizures. Although testosterone was found within the normal range for adult men, the serum estrogen concentration was below the detection limit (< 10 pg/ml) and his wrist epiphyses were not yet closed. After 10 months of treatment with the conjugated estrogen, both his height and weight showed improvement, while his bone mineral density and bone age were increased. These findings suggested that estrogen therapy had a significant effect on his skeletal growth and bone maturation in man. This is the first report showing the beneficial effect of estrogen supplementation in an epileptic man receiving treatment with anticonvulsants.
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ranking = 9
keywords = bone
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16/352. The association between Turner's syndrome and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    BACKGROUND: Turner's syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal disease frequently associated with autoimmune conditions including thyroid disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and diabetes. Recent reports have described an association with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and psoriatic arthritis. We describe three additional cases of TS associated with JRA. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this report is to describe the radiographic and clinical features of TS associated with JRA to heighten awareness of this association and alert radiologists to recognize the superimposition of radiographic bony changes of chronic joint disease and the bone changes of TS. patients and methods. Clinical history and radiographic images of three girls with TS and arthritis were reviewed. The radiographic findings typical of TS and juvenile arthritis are described. RESULTS: Of about 65 patients at our center with Turner's syndrome 3 had JRA (as described in this report), supporting the association between TS and JRA. All our patients who met American College of rheumatology classification criteria for JRA had radiographic and clinical findings consistent with both their JRA and Turner's syndrome. CONCLUSION: We believe that it is important to consider the diagnosis of Turner's syndrome in girls with JRA, recognizing that characteristic radiographic findings such as metacarpal shortening are usually present. Conversely, suspicion of an underlying inflammatory arthritis is warranted in search for radiological findings consistent with JRA in girls with TS and joint symptoms.
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keywords = bone
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17/352. Post-gastrectomy bone disease undiagnosed for forty years.

    Polya partial gastrectomy was performed for peptic ulcer in a previously healthy woman aged 28 years. She complained afterwards of a variety of non-specific symptoms including weakness, tiredness, debility, slowness of walking, poor appetite and constipation. Within ten years her back became bent. She was treated for intercurrent hypertension and epilepsy. Bone fractures on low-impact trauma occurred in her fifties. At 57 years, she was unable to care for herself and had to be admitted to a nursing home. She could still walk slowly with the aid of a stick. For three months at the age of 65 years, she was unable to rise from her chair. Investigations disclosed severe post-gastrectomy bone disease. At no time had she complained of bone pains.
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ranking = 68.227771619887
keywords = bone disease, bone
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18/352. Subcapital femoral neck fracture after closed reduction and internal fixation of an intertrochanteric hip fracture: a case report and review of the literature.

    A subcapital femoral neck fracture in a healed intertrochanteric fracture treated by an open reduction and internal fixation is a rare, but catastrophic, event. We present the case of an 86-year-old woman, a community ambulator, who sustained a displaced right intertrochanteric hip fracture during a fall. She was treated with closed reduction and internal fixation with a dynamic compression hip screw and side plate. Four months later, she was noted to have a displaced subcapital femoral neck fracture and underwent hip screw and side plate hardware removal and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Both postoperative recoveries were uncomplicated, and she was discharged to a rehabilitation facility able to ambulate with minimal assistance. This devastating complication in patients with osteoporosis may be prevented by deeper placement of the dynamic hip compression lag screw to within 5 mm to 8 mm of the subchondral bone, which may decrease the stress forces in the subcapital femoral neck.
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19/352. Mitochondrial dna deletion associated oxidative stress and severe male osteoporosis.

    We have screened the mitochondrial genome of 15 men with symptomatic vertebral fractures (median age 62 years, range 27-72 years) and 17 male control subjects (median age 61 years, range 40-73 years) for the presence of mitochondrial dna (mtDNA) deletions in peripheral monocyte dna. polymerase chain reaction analysis provided evidence of a common age-related (4.9 kb) mtDNA deletion situated between nucleotides 8470 and 13.460 of the genomic sequence in 5 of the 17 controls (29%) and 9 of the 15 patients (60%) investigated. Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction revealed a novel 3.7 kb deletion in 2 patients. One of the affected patients, a 27-year-old man with severe osteoporosis (lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) 0.381 g/cm(2); Z-score -6.45) was found to harbor deletion in almost 50% of the mitochondria. The patient had a blood lactic acid level (4.6 nM) that was over 3 times the upper reference range (0-1.3 mM), thus confirming the presence of systemic oxidative stress. Further analysis by modified primer shift polymerase chain reaction showed the 5' breakpoint to be between the nucleotides 10.63 kb and 10.80 kb of the mtDNA. The second patient harboring the 3.7 kb deletion was older (62 years) with less severe osteoporosis (lumbar spine BMD 0.727/cm(2); Z-score -2.58) and the proportion of affected mitochondria was lower (25%). The significance of these findings is discussed and the possible relation between oxidative stress and accelerated bone loss is examined.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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20/352. Vertebral rarefaction in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    A 16-year-old boy is reported in whom back pain, due to localised osteoporosis and partial collapse of a lumbar vertebra, drew attention to unsuspected acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The patient responded promptly to induction therapy, his symptoms disappeared, and he is presently in the maintenance programme. The skeletal lesion continues to heal slowly. attention is drawn to this unusual presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and the importance of bone-marrow examination in the study of unexplained cases of osteoporosis is emphasised.
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