Cases reported "Otitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus: pediatric otitis.

    BACKGROUND: methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a potentially lethal organism in pediatric patients. MRSA is an uncommon otologic pathogen that requires special diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. methods: Three pediatric patients with community-acquired MRSA otologic infections were identified during 1999. SETTING: Tertiary care ear institution. RESULTS: All patients required intravenous antibiotic therapy to achieve resolution of the infections. CONCLUSIONS: MRSA in children can be community acquired and can cause otitis externa, otitis media with otorrhea, or acute mastoiditis; intravenous therapy that includes vancomycin is necessary for resolution.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. Hyper-IgM syndrome with CHARGE association.

    A girl with coloboma of the iris, sensorineural deafness, growth delay, distinctive face, and cranial nerve dysfunction was diagnosed of CHARGE association in the first year of life. She presented with repeated otitis. At 3 yr of age, the patient suffered a septicemia (streptococcus pneumoniae, corynebacterium sp.). The immunoglobulin g (IgG) and IgA serum levels were decreased, IgM increased and cellular immunity parameters were normal, supporting the diagnosis of hyper-IgM (HIM) syndrome. The sequence of cd40 ligand and cytidine deaminase genes were normal. From then on, she was receiving immunoglobulin intravenously with an excellent outcome. Here, we report the first case of CHARGE association and HIM syndrome in the same patient. Although the cause could not be identified, a non-random link is likely.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. Pseudallescheriasis in northern Britain.

    Five cases of pseudallescheria boydii infection are reported from the northern part of the United Kingdom. None of the patients had travelled abroad. Three cases of otitis in which P. boydii was associated with bacterial infections were diagnosed within a 6-month period. A lady who had diabetes mellitus presented with a pulmonary fungus ball in a pre-existent cavity caused by a previous bacterial infection. After minor trauma at the site of an old skin graft, a farmer's wife developed an ulcer on the dorsum of the right ankle. Precipitating antibodies were demonstrated except in two of the cases of ear infection. The management of the individual cases is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. Three cases of chronic granular myringitis cured by formalin.

    This paper reports three cases of chronic granular myringitis treated with aural toilet using 0.5% formalin. The differential diagnoses of chronic suppurative otitis media and polypoid myringitis are discussed, as well as the properties of formalin, its side effects, and the technique of toilet. It is suggested that in some cases formalin may be a more effective agent for chronic granular myringitis than other treatments.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Otogenic pasteurella multocida brain abscess and glomus jugulare tumour.

    We report the occurrence of a pasteurella multocida temporal lobe abscess in an elderly woman who had a history of neglected chronic purulent otitis and in whom an extensive ipsilateral glomus tumour invading the petrous bone was found. We believe this is the first report in the literature of an otogenic cerebral abscess associated with a glomus jugulare tumour and the fifth report of a pasteurella multocida brain abscess. The synergistic pathogenesis of the otitis and the glomus tumour in the evolution of the abscess is hypothesized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. Infantile chlamydial pneumonia--a review based on 115 cases.

    Clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies and management of chlamydial pneumonia were reviewed in 115 infants and compared to those from 21 infants with interstitial pertussoid eosinophilic pneumonia. The identity of these two forms of subacute afebrile pneumonia is suggested. chlamydial pneumonia is natally acquired, essentially occurs during the second and third month of life, and its frequency in the united states is surprisingly high. Gradual onset of respiratory tract symptoms, lack of possible infection from symptomatic persons, afebrile course and staccato cough represent the typical anamnesis. Presence of conjunctivitis and serous otitis is common. Distinctive diagnostic studies include slight eosinophilia (greater than or equal to 300 eosinophils/mm3), elevated serum immunoglobulins M and G, depressed PO2 and normal PCO2 in arterial blood under room air, and both interstitial infiltrates and hyperexpansion of the lungs on chest roentgenogram. Chlamydial cultures of nasopharyngeal secretions or tracheal aspirates, and determination of antichlamydial antibody titers in serum are indicated in establishing the etiology. Adequate management consists of antichlamydial chemotherapy and general supportive care, including chest physiotherapy and oxygen and parenteral fluids when needed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. Orbital and periorbital cellulitis in children.

    The proper management of patients with orbital and periorbital cellulitis represents a distinct challenge to the clinician. A retrospective study is presented of 165 patients with the diagnosis of orbital or periorbital cellulitis admitted to the Children's Hospital of philadelphia (CHOP) from January 1975 through December 1980. sinusitis, trauma, local skin inflammations, and otitis were the most common etiologies. Twenty-three of the patients had orbital cellulitis, all of which were secondary to sinusitis. There was one death in this series. No patients had permanent ocular sequelae related to orbital or periorbital cellulitis. A discussion of etiology and management is presented, with emphasis on the usefulness of computerized tomography (CT).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. Implantation of electromagnetic ossicular replacement device.

    Semi-implantable hearing aids consisting of permanent middle ear implanted magnet, either partial ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP's) or total ossicular replacement prostheses (TORP's) driven by an electromagnet placed in the ear canal have been tested on six patients undergoing surgery for chronic otitis. The surgical and audiological problems are described. The audiological results were excellent in all six cases. A functional gain of 40-70 dB can be obtained for entire frequency range of the audiogram.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. External auditory canal stricture secondary to epidermolysis bullosa.

    A 24-year-old woman had epidermolysis bullosa simplex involving the external ear canal with resultant stricture that led to conductive hearing loss and repeated episodes of external otitis. Treatment consisted of scar excision, bony canal enlargement, and split-thickness skin grafting. A four-year follow-up has demonstrated no recurrence of disease. Mechanobullous diseases are characterized by blistering of the skin and mucous membrane following frictional trauma. In addition, the external ear may be deformed. Intraoral scarring may result in limitation of the mouth's opening. Dysphagia may occur secondarily to esophageal scarring. Endotracheal tubation may result in postoperative blisters necessitating tracheostomy. Even surgical scrubbing and use of skin tape may lead to blister formation. The otolaryngologist should be aware of the numerous problems these patients present.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Parasitic sinusitis and otitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: report of five cases and review.

    We describe five cases of parasitic sinusitis and otitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and review 14 reported cases. The pathogens identified in our group of patients included agents such as Microsporidium, cryptosporidium, and acanthamoeba species. The clinical features common to these patients included a long history of hiv seropositivity associated with advanced immunosuppression and multiple opportunistic infections as well as long-standing local symptoms refractory to multiple courses of antibacterial agents. Symptoms often included fever and chills in addition to local tenderness and discharge. Invasive diagnostic procedures were necessary to obtain the final diagnosis and to initiate appropriate therapy. Although most patients responded at least partially to specific therapy, relapses and recurrences were frequent in patients who did not receive long-term suppressive therapy. The general outcome for HIV-infected patients with parasitic sinusitis and otitis was poor; however, deaths were generally associated with other complications of the underlying HIV infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = otitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Otitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.