Cases reported "Ovarian Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/376. Ovarian endometrioid-like yolk sac tumor treated by surgery alone, with recurrence at 12 years.

    We describe the case of a stage Ia endometrioid-like yolk sac tumor (YST) of the ovary, which was originally misdiagnosed as a malignant struma ovarii and not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. After 12 years, a contralateral dermoid cyst was excised along with a small omental nodule of partially necrotic and calcified endometrioid-like YST. No tumor was detected in several other biopsy specimens, and a peritoneal lavage was negative for tumor cells. Since there was no evidence of remaining tumor and the serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was normal after the second operation, the patient was followed. Serial serum AFP levels remained normal for 4 months. At a second-look laparotomy after 4 months, a small tumor nodule was removed from the cul-de-sac. Postoperatively, the patient received three cycles of BEP chemotherapy. The long disease-free interval after the first operation in spite of the presence of occult spread to the omentum and to the pouch of Douglas in this case indicates that some endometrioid-like YSTs may have an indolent course. The present case underscores the importance of careful surgical staging and of long-term follow-up in cases of primitive germ cell tumors of the ovary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/376. Familial ovarian germ cell cancer: report and review.

    Ovarian germ cell cancers are rare malignancies accounting for less than 5% of all ovarian cancers. We present a family in which three closely related women were diagnosed with ovarian germ cell malignancies. This family's cancer history prompted a family history investigation of women treated for ovarian germ cell malignancies in the Gynecologic-Oncology Clinic at the University of wisconsin. One of the eight patients whose family histories were reviewed had an uncle who had been diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer. A review found six other previously reported families in which more than one relative had been diagnosed with a malignant ovarian germ cell tumor. Additionally, several cases of families with both males and females diagnosed with germ cell cancers have been documented. The low incidence of ovarian germ cell cancers suggests that multiple occurrences in the same family may not be due to chance. Rather, it is possible that a gene conferring susceptibility to ovarian germ cell cancers, and possibly to germ cell tumors in males as well, is present in at least some of these families.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/376. gonadoblastoma, mixed germ cell tumor, and Y chromosomal genotype: molecular analysis in four patients.

    This study reports on Y chromosomal genotypes of three patients with gonadoblastoma and one patient with gonadoblastoma and mixed germ cell tumor. Molecular analysis for 35 Y chromosomal loci was performed for dna samples taken from peripheral leukocytes and lymphoblastoid cell lines, showing that the four patients shared the region between DYS267 at interval 4A and DYF50S1 at interval 6D, with the exception of the region around DYS202 at interval 5K. In the patient with gonadoblastoma and mixed germ cell tumor, Y chromosomal material was preserved in the gonadoblastoma but was lost from the mixed germ cell tumor. The results, in conjunction with previous reports, suggest that GBY (gonadoblastoma locus on the y chromosome) may be located to a roughly 5-Mb pericentromeric region between DYS267 at interval 4A and DYS270 at interval 5A. The presence of Y chromosomal material in gonadoblastoma is consistent with GBY being involved in the development of gonadoblastoma, and the absence of Y chromosomal material in mixed germ cell tumor would be explained as a consequence of Y chromosomal loss from rapidly proliferating gonadal cancer cells.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/376. Ovarian hepatoid yolk sac tumours: morphological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features.

    AIM: The clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of two ovarian hepatoid yolk sac tumours (H-YST) from our files are reviewed. methods AND RESULTS: Using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique, the immunoprofile of these tumours was compared to that of a classic yolk sac tumour and to that previously reported for hepatocellular carcinomas. The clinicopathological and morphological features of our cases are similar to the seven previously reported ovarian cases. This rare germ cell tumour occurs in young females (mean age = 17.6 years) and presents most commonly with abdominal pain and a large ovarian mass (average size = 140 mm). Histologically, the tumours display a striking resemblance to hepatocellular carcinoma. The absence of an associated typical pattern of yolk sac tumour or other germ cell neoplasm may make it difficult to recognize the germ cell origin of this lesion. Our cases demonstrated positive staining for alpha-fetoprotein and alpha-1-antitrypsin. In addition, there was immunoreactivity with polyclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antiserum in a canalicular pattern, focal staining for inhibin, oestrogen and progesterone receptors and absence of immunoreactivity for CK7 that contrasts with the immunophenotype of a usual yolk sac tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian H-YST and hepatocellular carcinoma share a similar immunoprofile. Ovarian H-YST is a highly aggressive tumour, most patients exhibit recurrence or die of disease within 2 years of diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/376. Ovarian dysgerminoma, investigations on cell-and humoral-mediated immunologic reactions.

    A 17-year-old girl with repeated ovarian dysgerminoma is described. Postoperative immunologic investigations prior to irradiation showed a transient increased cell--an humoral--mediated immunologic responsiveness of the patient for approximately 2 1/2 months. After irradiation, a markedly defective response to PHA was observed which improved when reexamined 11 months later. The patient is well 22 months after the second operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/376. Malignant struma ovarii: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    struma ovarii consists of thyroid tissue derived from germ cells in a mature teratoma. Malignant transformation is very rare, with clinically evident metastatic disease reported in approximately 20 cases. The rarity of this disease renders evaluation of treatment modalities difficult. There is evidence that these tumors behave like their thyroid counterparts, and cytoreductive surgery followed by ablation with radioactive iodine has been advocated. We report the diagnosis and treatment of 2 patients with metastatic malignant struma ovarii treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/376. SRY mutation and tumor formation on the gonads of XP pure gonadal dysgenesis patients.

    We report three patients with XY pure gonadal dysgenesis. Two of these patients developed gonadoblastoma and associated dysgerminoma. Molecular analyses were undertaken to investigate the relationship between the formation of these tumors and Y chromosome aberrations. Deletion analyses were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of y chromosome-specific dna sequences (PABY, SRY, DYS250, DYS254, and DYZ1). A cryptic deletion of the short arm of the y chromosome that included the PABY, SRY, DYS250, and DYS254 loci was observed in one of the patients (22-years-old) with an associated tumor. In the other two patients who did not demonstrate such a deletion, the sequence of the SRY open reading frame was determined by the dideoxynucleotide method. Two nucleotide substitutions followed by a seven nucleotide deletion were observed in the 3' end of HMG (high mobility group)-box in the other patient (15-years-old) with an associated tumor. The patient (22-years-old) without an associated tumor did not have the cryptic deletion or mutation of SRY. A y chromosome specific sequence (DYZ1) was demonstrated by PCR amplification of microdissected tumor tissues from these two patients. These results suggest that SRY may play a role in the formation of gonadal tumors, especially dysgerminoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/376. trisomy 21 associated with ovarian dysgerminoma.

    A 13-year-old G(0)P(0) white female with trisomy 21 presented with a complex pelvic mass. She underwent resection of the mass and complete staging for what was found to be a stage IIIC completely resected dysgerminoma. She was treated with three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy and remains free of disease 1 year later. This association is presented as a rare case that may illustrate the relative increase in germ cell neoplasms in female patients with Down's syndrome. While the association of seminoma with Down's syndrome has been documented in a number of cases in males, the female counterpart of this tumor, dysgerminoma, in trisomy 21 has been reported quite infrequently. The potential for germ cell tumors in both male and female trisomy 21 is therefore illustrated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/376. carcinosarcoma of the ovary in a patient with a germline BRCA2 mutation: evidence for monoclonal origin.

    BACKGROUND: Themajority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are associated with germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. While the occurrence of breast carcinoma and epithelial ovarian carcinoma in association with BRCA mutations is firmly established, the etiologic role of these genes in the development of other tumor types is less well documented. carcinosarcoma of the ovary is an uncommon tumor consisting of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal components. OBJECTIVE: Here we report a patient with an ovarian carcinosarcoma who was found to harbor a germline mutation in BRCA2. We sought to link the BRCA2 mutation to the pathogenesis of this tumor as well as to determine whether both histologic components arose from the same progenitor cell. methods: microdissection and molecular genetic analyses of the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components of this tumor were performed. RESULTS: Clonal loss of the wild-type BRCA2 allele as well as the same somatic mutation of the TP53 gene was evident in both histologic components. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that hereditary ovarian carcinosarcoma may result from a mutation in BRCA2 and that both histologic elements of this tumor arose from the same progenitor cell.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/376. microsatellite instability and hMSH2 gene mutation in a triple cancer (colon cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer) patient in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindred.

    A patient who had triple cancer (colon cancer, endometrial cancer, and ovarian cancer) in HNPCC kindred is reported. Her family history revealed the occurrence of colon cancer in her paternal aunt and in two cousins, fulfilling the minimum HNPCC criteria. microsatellite instability analysis revealed replication error (RER) in all cancer lesions at 2 microsatellite loci (D1S191, BAT 40). SSCP analysis suggested germline mutation in exon 2 of the hMSH2 gene. This case showed the importance of complete family-history investigations to identify HNPCC patients. In the near future, definitive diagnosis of HNPCC will be possible on the basis of dna studies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = germ
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Ovarian Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.