Cases reported "Pain, Postoperative"

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1/3. Recurrent seizure activity after epidural morphine in a post-partum woman.

    PURPOSE: We report on a primiparous woman who suffered recurrent seizure activity after repeated small doses of epidural morphine to highlight the neuroexcitation potential of neuraxial opioids in the epileptic patient. CLINICAL FEATURES: Seizure activities as a complication of opioid administration have been reported in laboratory animals and humans. We report the case of a 30-yr-old primiparous woman with a history of epilepsy under carbamazepine treatment, who had epidural anesthesia for elective cesarean section at 38 weeks gestation. Postoperatively, 1.5 mg of morphine were administered epidurally for pain control. Three hours later the patient suffered from clonic movements of the right arm without loss of consciousness. One day later, she again received 1 mg of epidural morphine twice at a 12-hr interval and similar seizure episodes recurred eight hours after each dose. A relation between the administration of morphine and seizure activity was suspected and the use of opioids for pain control was stopped. The patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day and, more than one year after the last episode, she remains free of any seizure activity. CONCLUSION: Our report indicates that even a remote history of epilepsy carries a pro-convulsant potential in the peripartum period, even following the administration of small doses of epidural morphine.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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2/3. spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment for the chronic intractable visceral pelvic pain.

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have demonstrated significant involvement of dorsal column pathways in transmission of visceral pelvic pain. spinal cord stimulation (SCS) suppresses visceral response to colon distension in an animal model and therefore may be an effective therapy for chronic pelvic pain of visceral origin. We are reporting on the value of neurostimulation for chronic visceral pelvic pain in six female patients with the diagnosis of long-standing pelvic pain (history of endometriosis, multiple surgical explorations, and dyspareunia). DESIGN AND SETTINGS: Case-series report. All patients received repeated hypogastric blocks (in an average of 5.3 blocks) with a significant pain relief for a period ranging from 1 to 6 weeks. Three received neurolytic hypogastric block with the pain relief of 3, 8, and 12 months, respectively. Following psychological evaluation and clearance by our Multidisciplinary Committee on Implantable Devices, they all underwent SCS trial for 7-14 days. All patients received SCS systems with dual leads (Compact or Quad leads, Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). RESULTS: The average follow-up was 30.6 months. Median visual analog scale pain score decreased from 8 to 3. All patients had more than 50% of the pain relief. Pain Disability Index changed from an average of 57.7 /- 12 to 19.5 /- 7. Opiate use decreased from an average 22.5 mg to 6.6 mg of morphine sulfate milligram equivalents per day. CONCLUSION: It appears that SCS may have a significant therapeutic potential for treatment of visceral pelvic pain.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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3/3. Compulsive targeted self-injurious behaviour in humans with neuropathic pain: a counterpart of animal autotomy? Four case reports and literature review.

    Four cases of compulsive self-injurious behaviour (SIB) with variable degrees of tissue damage targeted to the painful body part are reported in humans with neuropathic pain. review of human literature revealed several cases, primarily after central nervous system (CNS) lesions, during which non-psychotic verbally communicating humans (mostly with intact mental status) target specifically the painful part which is usually analgesic or hypoalgesic. In few instances, however, the involved part is not only sentient but also hyperalgesic in part or as a whole. The act is characterized by uncontrollable urge and compulsion, aggravated under conditions of stress, isolation, confusion or depression, and occasionally occurring in patients with personality disorders, ongoing drug abuse and pre-existing compulsive habits (i.e., habitual nail biting or picking). It fails to be deterred by the appearance of the injured part, social mores or even the experience of pain. Successful treatment of underlying painful dysesthesiae with specific medications, neurostimulation or surgery has resulted in marked improvement of dysesthesiae accompanied by wound healing in several cases. The four presented cases and the human literature experience provide evidence that compulsive targeted SIB in humans with neuropathic pain and painful dysesthesiae is consistent with the concept that animal autotomy may result from chronic neuropathic pain after experimental peripheral or CNS lesions.
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keywords = animal
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