Cases reported "Pain, Postoperative"

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1/219. The CO 2 laser in mastectomy: a ten-year follow-up.

    We compared the healing process, postoperative course, and follow-up of patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy in the conventional way with those who underwent a laser procedure. Sixty women, aged 33 to 77 years, who suffered from carcinoma of the breast were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1: surgery was performed using scalpel and electrosurgery; Group 2: surgery was performed with a CO 2 Sharplan laser, skin-to-skin including the axilla dissection; maximal power, 40-60 W. The postoperative course was uneventful in both groups. wound healing was normal. sutures were removed on the tenth day. patients were followed at the Outpatient Clinic for 10 years. The circumference of the arm and forearm was measured at fixed points before surgery and at follow-up. mammography and liver and bone scans were performed every year. Four Group 1 patients developed swelling and edema of 2 to 3 cm at 6 to 8 months after surgery. Also two patients from subgroup A developed local recurrence. No edema or swelling or local recurrence could be detected in patients operated by laser. Surgery with laser is preferable to the conventional approach.
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2/219. Epidural hematoma following epidural catheter placement in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PURPOSE: We report a case of epidural hematoma in a surgical patient with chronic renal failure who received an epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia. Symptoms of epidural hematoma occurred about 60 hr after epidural catheter placement. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 58-yr-old woman with a history of chronic renal failure was admitted for elective abdominal cancer surgery. Preoperative laboratory values revealed anemia, hematocrit 26%, and normal platelet, PT and PTT values. General anesthesia was administered for surgery, along with epidural catheter placement for postoperative analgesia. Following uneventful surgery, the patient completed an uneventful postoperative course for 48 hr. Then, the onset of severe low back pain, accompanied by motor and sensory deficits in the lower extremities, alerted the anesthesia team to the development of an epidural hematoma extending from T12 to L2 with spinal cord compression. Emergency decompressive laminectomy resulted in recovery of moderate neurologic function. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first case of epidural hematoma formation in a surgical patient with chronic renal failure (CRF) and epidural postoperative analgesia. The only risk factor for the development of epidural hematoma was a history of CRF High-risk patients should be monitored closely for early signs of cord compression such as severe back pain, motor or sensory deficits. An opioid or opioid/local anesthetic epidural solution, rather than local anesthetic infusion alone, may allow continuous monitoring of neurological function and be a prudent choice in high-risk patients. If spinal hematoma is suspected, immediate MRI or CT scan should be done and decompressive laminectomy performed without delay.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = operative
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3/219. Duodenal perforations after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Duodenal perforations after laparoscopic cholecystectomies are rarely reported. The aim of this study is to focus on this complication and to suggest ways to reduce its occurrence and avoid diagnostic mistakes and therapeutical delays that could be fatal. We reviewed four personal cases and a number of others reported in the literature. Duodenal perforations are caused by improper use of the irrigator-aspirator device when retracting the duodenum, or by electrosurgical and laser burns. A duodenal perforation should be suspected in cases of bile leakage, peritonitis, intraabdominal or retroperitoneal collections, high serum or drainage amylase concentration, absence of bile leakage from the biliary tree, and the existence of a retroduodenal mass. Diagnosis requires a gastrografin upper GI series. Differential diagnosis is mainly with biliary lesions and other causes of peritonitis. Relaparoscopy may require intraoperative upper GI endoscopy or Kocher's duodenal mobilization to detect the perforation. early diagnosis allows primary repair, usually by laparoscopy. Perforations of the duodenal cap are easier to diagnose and have a better prognosis than those of the descending duodenum. A lumbar abscess is a frequent complication.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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4/219. Use of the laryngeal mask airway during repair of atrial septal defect in children.

    We describe the elective use of the laryngeal mask airway in two children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for repair of an atrial septal defect. Total surgical time was short and cardiopulmonary bypass performed at normothermia allowing removal of the laryngeal mask airway on the operating table on completion of surgery. We were able to adequately oxygenate and ventilate the children throughout the procedure using positive pressure ventilation and spontaneous ventilation. The use of caudal fentanyl and rectal diclofenac aided postoperative pain management. Atrial septal defect repair has become one of the more straightforward cardiac operations partly as a result of new cardiopulmonary bypass techniques. Avoidance of intubation and postoperative ventilation in appropriate patients would make this procedure ideal for 'fast tracking' and offers the potential advantages of decreased length of stay in hospital and reduction in overall costs.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/219. Continuous spinal anaesthesia/analgesia for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and post-operative pain management.

    The intra-operative management of two patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular pathology, who underwent peripheral reconstructive vascular surgery under continuous spinal anaesthesia, is described. Furthermore, continuous intrathecal analgesia was also continued in the post-operative period and provided effective pain relief that was reflected by the favourable surgical outcome.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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6/219. Anaesthetic management for a left pneumonectomy in a child with bronchopleural fistula.

    The anaesthetic management of a left pneumonectomy in a 18-month-old girl with a bronchopleural fistula is described. An ordinary tracheal tube was slit at the bevel to ensure upper lobe ventilation on right endobronchial intubation. A combination of a bronchial blocker, endobronchial intubation with a slit tube, and nerve blocks for these manoeuvres was used. Pain relief by a thoracic epidural block ensured good physiotherapy and a comfortable postoperative period.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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7/219. Does ketamine have preemptive effects in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy procedures?

    ketamine may produce "preemptive" analgesia when administered before surgically induced trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that pre- versus postincisional administration of ketamine would improve pain control after abdominal hysterectomy procedures. Eighty-nine patients were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups according to a placebo-controlled, double-blinded protocol: Group 1 (placebo) received saline 0.04 mL/kg IV immediately before and after surgery; Group 2 (preincision), received ketamine 0.4 mg/kg IV before skin incision and saline at the end of the operation; and Group 3 (postincision), received saline before skin incision, and ketamine 0.4 mg/kg IV was given after skin closure. The general anesthetic technique was standardized in all three treatment groups. During the first postoperative hour, Group 3 experienced significantly less pain than Groups 1 and 2, as assessed by using both visual analog and verbal rating scales. There were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 with respect to pain scores, postoperative opioid analgesic requirements, and incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. We conclude that a single dose of ketamine 0.4 mg/kg IV fails to produce preemptive analgesic effects. Implications: Even though ketamine 0.4 mg/kg IV has short-lasting acute analgesic effects, it failed to produce a preemptive effect when given before abdominal hysterectomy procedures.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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8/219. Neurogenic pain.

    Effective preoperative communication and an awareness of the mechanisms and treatment of neurogenic pain by nursing staff directly influence the choice of intraoperative and postoperative pain management. This article describes the case study of a young woman with neurogenic pain and highlights the importance of having a working knowledge of this type of pain, its assessment, and treatment.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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9/219. hemorrhage after bone marrow harvest: a case presentation.

    The purpose of this article is to describe the usual procedure and postoperative recovery after an allogeneic bone marrow harvest and to present a case study of an unusual complication of hemorrhage. The case study describes a donor who experienced hemorrhage with severe pain, muscle spasms, and prolonged limitations in range of motion and ambulation. Oncology nurses should inform donors to promptly report persistent pain, spasms, and muscle weakness. Should hemorrhage occur, blood loss should be evaluated, bedrest should be maintained, and cold packs should be applied to the area. Although excessive bleeding is a rare occurrence, nurses should be alert for this complication to prevent pain and activity impairment.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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10/219. Severe incisional pain and long thoracic nerve injury after port-access minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    The authors describe the occurrence of severe postoperative pain and long thoracic nerve injury after Port-Access minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. The potential for these events and the impact on postoperative hospitalization and rehabilitation are emphasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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