Cases reported "Pain"

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11/45. Neurogenic pain and abnormal movements contralateral to an anterior parietal artery stroke.

    BACKGROUND: Unlike delayed pain syndrome, acute central pain is a very rare symptom in acute stroke. In addition, the incidence of hemiballismus in acute cerebrovascular diseases is less than 1%. To our knowledge, the association of these 2 clinical conditions has not been previously described. PATIENT AND methods: After observing one patient with hemiballismus accompanied by ipsilateral acute limb pain at stroke onset, we retrospectively examined more than 4000 patients in the Lausanne stroke Registry for hemiballismus-hemichorea occurring together with acute ipsilateral pain. RESULTS: Of the 29 subjects with hemiballismus-hemichorea, the observed patient was the only one to have acute pain at the onset of stroke. magnetic resonance imaging showed acute infarction in the territory of the right anterior parietal artery, whereas the basal ganglia, thalamus, and subthalamic region were intact. CONCLUSIONS: The syndrome of acute limb pain associated with hemiballismus may result from disconnection of the parietal lobe from deeper structures. In contrast with isolated hemiballismus, we suggest that the simultaneous occurrence of this movement disorder with ipsilateral pain is specific for an anterior parietal artery stroke.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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12/45. life-threatening thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in a patient with sickle cell-hemoglobin c disease.

    We report a patient with hemoglobin sickle cell-hemoglobin c disease who developed the clinical syndrome of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) during admission for typical acute pain crisis. The potential for multiorgan involvement secondary to vaso-occlusive crisis complicated the diagnosis and overlapped with the patient's clinical presentation of chronic bone pain and hemolytic anemia. Clinical improvement and normalization of laboratory parameters followed rapidly in response to plasma exchange therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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13/45. magnetic resonance imaging assessment of sacroiliac joint involvement in Gaucher's disease.

    A young woman with Gaucher's disease experienced acute pain in her right sacroiliac (SI) joint. Although pelvic radiographs and computed tomographic scan showed no significant change in the right SI joint, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an area of high signal intensity in the iliac part of the right SI joint, and a periosseous collection of blood. This skeletal location is rarely reported in Gaucher's disease; the mechanism of bone crisis is still controversial and our case suggests the occurrence of a bone infarct.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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14/45. acute pain in advanced cancer: an opioid dosing strategy and illustration.

    Opioid dosing strategies for acute pain differ from strategies for chronic pain management. The basic principles of effective, safe dosing are rapid titration to the onset of analgesia followed by maintenance infusions based upon the titrated dose. This article presents guidelines and case histories for safe and effective dosing.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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15/45. A case of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome after peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line insertion.

    Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. patients often present initially with acute pain in the proximal forearm, lasting several hours to days. The pain subsides, to be followed by paresis or total paralysis of the pronator quadratus, flexor pollicis longus and the radial half of the flexor profundus, either individually or together. patients with a complete lesion will have a characteristic pinch deformity. We report a case of anterior interosseous syndrome in a 42-year-old male. The patient was admitted initially for chronic osteomyelitis of the left calcaneum. He had a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line inserted into a brachial vein for the administration of intravenous antibiotics, and developed anterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of this procedure. The catheter was subsequently removed and a new line was placed on the other side, and his neurological deficit has been improving since. This case highlights the potential hazards of venupuncture or arterial puncture of the brachial vein or artery respectively, even under controlled conditions with the benefit of ultrasound guidance. It also serves as a reminder to look out for the complications of these common procedures, and to be able to react appropriately when they arise.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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16/45. Painful thyroid gland: an atypical presentation of Graves' disease.

    An adolescent with Graves' disease presented with acute painful swelling of the thyroid gland and overlying erythema simulating acute suppurative or subacute thyroiditis. She had an elevated radioactive iodine uptake, thyroid stimulating antibodies, thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins, and a normal sedimentation rate and leucocyte count. The course of the thyrotoxicosis and painful thyroid was protracted, and the pain and tenderness of the thyroid recurred on two subsequent relapses.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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17/45. The impact of regional anaesthesia on outcome: a patient's perspective.

    Peripheral nerve catheters are being used increasingly to manage acute pain. Whilst acknowledged as effective, their broader implications for patient outcome are less clear. In this case report, we describe the way in which not only was the pain management of an ischaemic leg successful via a sciatic nerve catheter, but decision-making around this strategy affected outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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18/45. Acute painful neuropathy restricted to the abdomen following rapid glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    A 46-year-old Japanese man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whose only diabetic complication was simple retinopathy, developed acute painful neuropathy. This presented as paresthesia and hyperesthesia restricted to the abdomen. The patient's haemoglobin A(1c) had dropped from 12% to 7.5% within 5 months, following a rapid improvement in glycaemic control. On investigation, there were no indications of disease in the intraabdominal area. Nerve conduction studies were consistent with mild sensorimotor peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. The patient required medication (mexiletine, sulpiride and imipramine hydrochloride) to control the pain. Four months after presentation, the symptoms showed a dramatic improvement and the treatment for pain relief was discontinued without any recurrence of paresthesia or hyperesthesia in the patient's abdomen. This was a very unusual case of diabetic post-treatment painful neuropathy in which the prominent features were severe pain, paresthesia and hyperesthesia restricted to the abdomen.
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ranking = 1
keywords = acute pain
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19/45. Complete relief of pain in acute painful diabetic neuropathy of rapid glycaemic control (insulin neuritis) with venlafaxine HCL.

    This article reports a case of a diabetic patient who suffered from acute painful diabetic neuropathy, following an intensive insulin treatment after a poor glycaemic control period of 8 yr. On the 15th day of the insulin treatment, which enabled rapid successful glycaemic control, the patient began complaining of pain and a burning sensation in the lower extremities, especially during the night. Venlafaxine HCL was initiated and the patient was completely free of pain on the third day of the treatment. As insulin neuritis is infrequent among diabetic patients we consider it is worth reporting the dramatic effect of the venlafaxine HCL treatment.
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ranking = 5
keywords = acute pain
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20/45. acute pain and opioid seeking behaviour.

    BACKGROUND: acute pain is a common presentation associated with opioid seeking behaviour. OBJECTIVE: This case study provides a practical approach for general practitioners seeing patients with acute pain whom they suspect of seeking opioids because of dependence. DISCUSSION: acute pain commonly presents as an emergency appointment 'squeezed in' between booked appointments. general practitioners have to make a rapid assessment of the possible underlying causes, relieve pain, and establish a plan for further investigation and management. Furthermore, some opioid dependent people can and do effectively feign acute pain in order to obtain opioid medication.
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ranking = 2
keywords = acute pain
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