Cases reported "Pain"

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1/308. Radiologic case study. Primary lymphoma of bone.

    Distinguishing primary lymphoma of bone from disseminated lymphoma and similar appearing bone malignancies is important because of its better prognosis. It is also important to remember how indolent the process can be even in the face of massive bone involvement. Early recognition of this rare entity can increase patient survival.
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2/308. Eyelid pruritus with intravenous morphine.

    The cause of eyelid pruritus (itching) may be difficult to determine, particularly in preverbal children. Tearing, photophobia, or eye rubbing may be the first manifestation of leukemic infiltration or graft-versus-host disease, necessitating early appropriate therapy. We report a child in whom persistent eye rubbing developed after bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. morphine administration was found to be the cause of this symptom.
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keywords = bone
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3/308. Incomplete nondisplaced tibial osteotomy for treatment of osteoarthritic knee pain.

    Intraosseous venous hypertension is considered a significant factor in the production of knee pain secondary to degenerative arthrosis, thus vascular decompression by means of tibial osteotomy is a rational option for treatment of selected patients. A preliminary report is presented of six patients with symptoms of primary or secondary degenerative arthrosis who were treated by incomplete nondisplaced proximal tibial osteotomy with good or excellent results. These patients were refractory to nonoperative treatment and were not deemed suitable candidates for angulated osteotomy, arthroscopic surgery alone, or total knee arthroplasty. patients ranged in age from 36 to 61 years (mean age: 47 years). Follow-up ranged from .8 to 6.7 years (mean: 3.1 years). The subjects were studied postoperatively by interview, physical examination, radiographs, and bone scans. Results were assessed using the knee rating system of The Hospital for Special Surgery.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = bone
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4/308. Differential bone scanning.

    This is a preliminary report of eleven patients with painful total joint arthroplasties. In their evaluation the difficulty in the differential diagnosis between the loose and the infected total joint becomes apparent. We have found the use of differential bone scans an accurate method to identify the infected total joint. Further study along these lines is indicated with a larger series and generalization to other types of implants.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = bone
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5/308. Enchondroma as a cause of midfoot pain.

    Enchondroma is a common bone tumor of the foot. It is often reported in the phalanges and distal metatarsals. The authors, however, present a rare case study of two patients with enchodromas as the cause of midfoot pain. One case presented in the lateral cuneiform which to the authors' knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Two cases are presented with their surgical management including autogenous calcaneal graft and follow-up.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = bone
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6/308. A staff dialogue on caring for a cancer patient who commits suicide: psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and caregivers.

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery which provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The Center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum during which caregivers discuss a specific cancer patient, reflect on the important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from their fellow staff members. The case presented was of a 31-year-old man who developed adenocarcinoma of the lung with painful bone metastases. His tumor was unresponsive to treatment and he subsequently committed suicide by shooting himself. The verbatim and subsequent discussion raised a number of issues. Staff were devastated by the violent way that he ended his life. They questioned whether more could have been done to prevent this outcome, yet acknowledged that it mirrored the way he had lived, and were able to discuss the values by which we live and die. Some, but not all, felt that the patient had the right to choose how and when to end his life.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = bone
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7/308. Current therapy in the management of heterotopic ossification of the elbow: a review with case studies.

    Heterotopic ossification, or the appearance of ectopic bone in para-articular soft tissues after surgery, immobilization, or trauma, complicates the surgical and physiatric management of injured joints. The chief symptoms of heterotopic ossification are joint and muscle pain and a compromised range of motion. Current therapies for prevention or treatment of heterotopic ossification include surgery, physical therapy, radiation therapy, and medical management. Unlike heterotopic ossification of the hip, heterotopic ossification of the elbow has not been extensively investigated, leaving its optimal management ill-defined. To remedy this deficiency, we review risk factors, clinical anatomy, physical findings, proposed mechanisms, and current practice for treatment and prevention of heterotopic ossification. We then consider and draw conclusions from four cases of elbow injury treated at our institutions (three complicated by heterotopic ossification) in which treatment included surgery, radiation therapy, physical therapy, and medical therapy. We summarize our institutional practices and conclude with a call for a randomized clinical trial to better define optimal management of heterotopic ossification of the elbow.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = bone
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8/308. Musculoskeletal manifestations of osteomalacia: report of 26 cases and literature review.

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to describe the musculoskeletal manifestations in a selected population of 26 patients with biopsy-proven osteomalacia (OM) and provide a literature update. methods: The 26 patients with biopsy-proven OM were selected from a total number of 79 patients who underwent anterior iliac crest biopsy. The diagnosis of OM was confirmed by the presence of an osteoid volume greater than 10%, osteoid width greater than 15 microm, and delayed mineralization assessed by double-tetracycline labeling. RESULTS: OM was caused by intestinal malabsorption in 13 patients, whereas six other patients presented with hypophosphatemia of different causes. Five elderly patients presented with hypovitaminosis D, and in two patients the OM was part of renal osteodystrophy. Twenty-three patients presented with bone pain and diffuse demineralization, whereas three other patients had normal or increased bone density. Characteristic pseudofractures were seen in only seven patients. Six of the 23 patients with diffuse demineralization had an "osteoporotic-like pattern" without pseudofractures. Prominent articular manifestations were seen in seven patients, including a rheumatoid arthritis-like picture in three, osteogenic synovitis in three, and ankylosing spondylitis-like in one. Two other patients were referred to us with the diagnosis of possible metastatic bone disease attributable to polyostotic areas of increased radio nuclide uptake caused by pseudofractures. Six patients also had proximal myopathy, two elderly patients were diagnosed as having polymalgia rheumatica, and two young patients were diagnosed as having fibromyalgia. One of the patients who presented with increased bone density was misdiagnosed as possible fluorosis. CONCLUSION: OM is usually neglected when compared with other metabolic bone diseases and may present with a variety of clinical and radiographic manifestations mimicking other musculoskeletal disorders.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = bone
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9/308. Tumor-induced osteomalacia and symptomatic looser zones secondary to mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare clinical entity that is associated with soft-tissue or skeletal tumors. We present a case report of a patient with a chest wall mesenchymal chondrosarcoma who presented with bone pain. The patient had skeletal changes in the femoral neck and fibula consistent with osteomalacia and laboratory values suggesting phosphate diabetes. The patient was treated with tumor resection and phosphate supplementation with reversal of the signs and symptoms of osteomalacia. Tumor-induced osteomalacia is vitamin-D-resistant and often reversed by complete removal of the tumor. Most commonly, the causative tumors are of vascular, mesenchymal, or fibrous origin. The osteomalacia is associated with bone pain, muscle weakness, and radiographic changes. Tumor-induced humoral factors have been implicated in causing the osteomalacia, but the definite etiology has yet to be determined. Current treatment includes complete tumor resection and electrolyte supplementation.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = bone
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10/308. Intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle: a report of three cases with long-term follow-up.

    Three cases of intraosseous ganglion cysts of the ankle are presented with an average follow-up of 68 months (range, 48-78 months). review of the literature revealed 251 cases of intraosseous ganglion cysts, with 75 located in the ankle and a recurrence rate of 6.1%. In the three cases presented, a satisfactory long-term result was obtained with bone graft and curettage in two cases and currettage alone in one case. No recurrences or complications occurred.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = bone
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