Cases reported "Pain"

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1/126. hypnosis: an alternative in pain management for nurse practitioners.

    hypnosis and the trance phenomenon is an age-old tool for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including pain. Medically accepted for over 50 years as a legitimate therapy, research continues into its mechanisms and actions. In this article, its origins, history, theoretical basis, and various uses are discussed. Case presentations from the author are provided, showing its use for a variety of pain management scenarios. Sample hypnotic scripts allow the reader to better visualize the applicability of hypnotic suggestion to general inductions and pain management. References are provided for individuals seeking further information and/or training in hypnosis.
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2/126. Painful supernumerary phantom arm following motor cortex stimulation for central poststroke pain. Case report.

    In this report, the authors describe a case in which the patient began to experience a supernumerary phantom arm after she received motor cortex stimulation for central pain. The patient had a history of right thalamocapsular stroke. It is speculated that the motor cortex activation triggered a response in the patient's parietal lobe, precipitating perception of the phantom limb. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of its kind.
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ranking = 54.605865137329
keywords = cortex
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3/126. Recurrent steroid-responsive trismus and painful ophthalmoplegia.

    A 63-year-old woman experienced two episodes of trismus and painful ophthalmoplegia at an interval of six years. She suffered left visual loss, and enhanced CT scan and MR imaging revealed heterogeneous enlargement of the left extraocular muscles extending to the orbital apex. In addition, the left pterygopalatine fossa was filled with a mass isointense with muscle without evidence of surrounding tissue invasion; 67Ga scintigraphy showed high uptake in this lesion. Steroid administration dramatically resolved the trismus, and the mass in the orbit and extraorbit vanished completely. orbital pseudotumor is characterized by self-limited, relapsing, steroid-responsive painful ophthalmoplegia, and this case could be a variant of this entity with inflammation extending into the extraorbital area.
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keywords = visual
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4/126. Parietal and cingulate processes in central pain. A combined positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of an unusual case.

    Parietal, insular and anterior cingulate cortices are involved in the processing of noxious inputs and genesis of pain sensation. Parietal lesions may generate central pain by mechanisms generally assumed to involve the 'medial' pain system (i.e. medial thalamic nuclei and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). We report here PET and fMRI data in a patient who developed central pain and allodynia in her left side after a bifocal infarct involving both the right parietal cortex (SI and SII) and the right ACC (Brodmann areas 24 and 32), thus questioning the schematic representation of cortical pain processing. No rCBF increase was found in any part of the residual cingulate cortices, neither in the basal state (which included spontaneous pain and extended hypoperfusion around the infarct), nor during left allodynic pain. Thus, as previously observed in patients with lateral medullary infarct, neither spontaneous pain nor allodynia reproduce the cingulate activation observed after noxious pain in normal subjects. Conversely, both PET and fMRI data argue in favour of plastic changes in the 'lateral discriminative' pain system. Particularly, allodynia was associated with increased activity anteriorly to the infarct in the right insula/SII cortex. This response is likely to be responsible for the strange and very unpleasant allodynic sensation elicited on the left side by a non-noxious stimulation.
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ranking = 27.302932568665
keywords = cortex
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5/126. A sighting of orbital pseudotumor.

    A 39-year-old woman developed bilateral proptosis, photophobia, and pain with extraocular movements over the course of 5 days. Her findings initially were ocular pain and photophobia which progressed to periorbital edema and nasal discharge ultimately resulting in proptosis with vertical globe displacement and decreased visual acuity. She was diagnosed with corneal abrasion and sinusitis respectively during two initial emergency department visits. On her third visit to the emergency department within 4 days, she developed acute visual deficits. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor after computed tomography scan revealed inflammation of orbital structures bilaterally.
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6/126. antiphospholipid syndrome with cortical blindness resulting from infarction around the posterior cerebral artery in an elderly woman.

    An 87-year-old woman with antiphospholipid syndrome accompanied by cortical blindness and thalamic syndrome resulting from infarction of the posterior cerebral artery is reported. She was hospitalized because of laceration of the head. Two months later, she complained of loss of visual acuity, sharp pain and numbness involving the left half of the body except her face. New right posterior lobe infarction and the existence of old left infarctions were confirmed by serial CT scans. Helical CT scan revealed embolization of the posterior cerebral artery with atherosclerotic stenosis. Serological examination showed biologically false-positive and positive findings for lupus anticoagulant. She was treated with warfarin potassium and clonazepam.
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ranking = 1
keywords = visual
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7/126. Gabapentin for chronic pain in spinal cord injury: a case report.

    A 30-year-old white woman with an L1 complete spinal cord injury (SCI) secondary to a gunshot wound in 1985, presented to a chronic pain service for evaluation. She had a 13-year history of chronic lower extremity pain. She described her discomfort as "throbbing, aching, and stabbing." She had tried many different medications, including opioids, Tegretol, and tricyclic antidepressants, without success. During the evaluation process, she admitted to being "angry, frustrated, and anxious." She was diagnosed with central pain after SCI. She was placed on gabapentin 300 mg 3 times daily; within 1 week, her visual analog pain scale fell from 95 mm to 27 mm, and her McGill Short Form pain score fell from 13 to 3. Her mood also vastly improved. This case report suggests that gabapentin should be studied as a therapeutic option for treating central pain post-SCI and should be considered as a viable, well-tolerated, low-toxicity tool.
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8/126. Reversal of thalamic hand syndrome by long-term motor cortex stimulation.

    The authors describe a case of complete recovery from the so-called "thalamic hand" syndrome following chronic motor cortex stimulation in a 64-year-old man suffering from poststroke thalamic central pain. As of the 2-year follow-up examination, the patient's dystonia and pain are still controlled by electrical stimulation. It is speculated that a common mechanism in which the thalamocortical circuit loops are rendered out of balance may sustain hand dystonia and central pain in this case of thalamic syndrome. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of its kind.
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ranking = 45.504887614441
keywords = cortex
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9/126. Bilateral painful hand-moving fingers: electrophysiological assessment of the central nervous system oscillator.

    We describe a 35-year-old woman who presented with the syndrome of painful hand-moving fingers on the right side. Eight months later, she developed similar finger movements and hand discomfort on the left side. She had a history of hand trauma and recurrent shoulder dislocation on the right side. Kinesiologic electromyography suggested a common central oscillator for finger movements in both hands. Electrophysiological assessment of spinal alpha motor neuron excitability, reciprocal inhibition, and Renshaw cell inhibition failed to show any abnormalities. Somatosensory evoked potential test showed marked attenuation of N20 potential recorded from the left somatosensory cortex; paired transcortical magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex suggested failure of cortical facilitation. The data suggest that the central oscillator responsible for finger movements is located above the spinal cord level in this patient.
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ranking = 18.201955045776
keywords = cortex
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10/126. Central necrotic lamellar inflammation after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PURPOSE: To report four cases of corneal interface complications that occurred after excimer laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). methods: Four eyes of three patients underwent technically uneventful LASIK. RESULTS: One day after LASIK, patients presented with severe pain, blurred vision, conjunctival infection, and diffuse opacity at the interface. Two days after LASIK, significant features were central opacity, striae in the flap, loss of uncorrected and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, and corneal sensitivity. The findings did not improve by using drugs or by lifting the flap and irrigating the bed. The central opacity partially resolved over 8 to 12 months, leaving a hyperopic shift (one patient), striae (one patient), and loss of two or more lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (three patients). CONCLUSION: This severe central inflammation after LASIK could be an extreme manifestation of diffuse lamellar keratitis.
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keywords = visual
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