Cases reported "Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/138. Femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain in a marathon runner: case report.

    A case is described of a 50-year-old man with a femoral neck stress fracture presenting as gluteal pain. An operative pinning procedure of the femoral neck was performed for stabilization. Femoral neck stress fractures are often misdiagnosed early in their presentation. The signs and symptoms can mimic those of more commonly seen disorders. Appropriate physiatric history and physical examination, along with indicated studies, will help prevent misdiagnosis and potentially serious complications associated with musculoskeletal pathology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/138. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with classic presentation of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and subsequent improvement with targeted epidural blood patch. methods: Report of one case and review of the literature. RESULTS: Examination of cerebrospinal fluid after lumbar puncture disclosed a reduced opening pressure, an increased level of protein, and lymphocytic pleocytosis. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium showed diffuse enhancement of the pachymeninges, no evidence of leptomeningeal enhancement, and chronic subdural fluid collection. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated reduced activity over the cerebral convexities, early accumulation of radiotracer in the urinary bladder, and direct evidence of leakage at the cervicothoracic junction (C7-T1). Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Therapy with a targeted epidural blood patch resulted in the rapid resolution of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In this report, we describe a classic case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension in a 63-year-old man with an initial presentation of postural headaches, blurred vision, pain in the left eye, diplopia on left gaze, and neck soreness.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/138. Tumor-induced osteomalacia and symptomatic looser zones secondary to mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare clinical entity that is associated with soft-tissue or skeletal tumors. We present a case report of a patient with a chest wall mesenchymal chondrosarcoma who presented with bone pain. The patient had skeletal changes in the femoral neck and fibula consistent with osteomalacia and laboratory values suggesting phosphate diabetes. The patient was treated with tumor resection and phosphate supplementation with reversal of the signs and symptoms of osteomalacia. Tumor-induced osteomalacia is vitamin-D-resistant and often reversed by complete removal of the tumor. Most commonly, the causative tumors are of vascular, mesenchymal, or fibrous origin. The osteomalacia is associated with bone pain, muscle weakness, and radiographic changes. Tumor-induced humoral factors have been implicated in causing the osteomalacia, but the definite etiology has yet to be determined. Current treatment includes complete tumor resection and electrolyte supplementation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/138. An unusual extraspinal cause of bilateral leg pain.

    low back pain with pain radiating to the lower extremities is common in patients referred to a spine center. Lumbar spine pathology is commonly the etiology of such symptoms, but extraspinal causes of back and leg pain can manifest as a radicular disorder. Extraspinal etiologies must be considered in the workup of back and leg pain. This report describes an unusual case of spontaneously occurring bilateral femoral neck stress fractures presenting as low back pain with seemingly bilateral L4 radicular symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/138. Dercum's disease (adiposis dolorosa).

    Dercum's disease (adiposis dolorosa) is a rare condition characterized by progressively painful fatty deposits, usually, in menopausal women with obesity, asthenia and mental phenomena. We report a case of a 48-year-old woman with recurrent neck swelling and pain in the neck and parotid region, and a review of management of this uncommon problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/138. Anterior hip pain.

    Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and directed conservative treatment. osteoarthritis, which is diagnosed radiographically, generally occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Arthritis in younger adults should prompt consideration of an inflammatory cause. A possible femoral neck stress fracture should be evaluated urgently to prevent the potentially significant complications associated with displacement. patients with osteitis pubis should be educated about the natural history of the condition and should undergo physical therapy to correct abnormal pelvic mechanics. "sports hernias," nerve entrapments and labral pathologic conditions should be considered in athletic adults with characteristic presentations and chronic symptoms. Surgical intervention may allow resumption of pain-free athletic activity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/138. Virtual reality as an adjunctive pain control during burn wound care in adolescent patients.

    For daily burn wound care procedures, opioid analgesics alone are often inadequate. Since most burn patients experience severe to excruciating pain during wound care, analgesics that can be used in addition to opioids are needed. This case report provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment can serve as a powerful adjunctive, nonpharmacologic analgesic. Two patients received virtual reality (VR) to distract them from high levels of pain during wound care. The first was a 16-year-old male with a deep flash burn on his right leg requiring surgery and staple placement. On two occasions, the patient spent some of his wound care in VR, and some playing a video game. On a 100 mm scale, he provided sensory and affective pain ratings, anxiety and subjective estimates of time spent thinking about his pain during the procedure. For the first session of wound care, these scores decreased 80 mm, 80 mm, 58 mm, and 93 mm, respectively, during VR treatment compared with the video game control condition. For the second session involving staple removal, scores also decreased. The second patient was a 17-year-old male with 33.5% total body surface area deep flash burns on his face, neck, back, arms, hands and legs. He had difficulty tolerating wound care pain with traditional opioids alone and showed dramatic drops in pain ratings during VR compared to the video game (e.g. a 47 mm drop in pain intensity during wound care). We contend that VR is a uniquely attention-capturing medium capable of maximizing the amount of attention drawn away from the 'real world', allowing patients to tolerate painful procedures. These preliminary results suggest that immersive VR merits more attention as a potentially viable form of treatment for acute pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/138. brachial plexus catheter reservoir for the treatment of upper-extremity cancer pain: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Infiltration of the brachial plexus with anesthetics can provide relief of upper-extremity pain from invasive cancer. Because the analgesia is short-lived, however, repeated invasive treatments are necessary. We describe the implantation of a catheter reservoir system, in which anesthetic injections through a subcutaneous port resulted in anesthetic infiltration of the brachial plexus. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 47-year-old Hispanic man with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx had undergone surgical resection, radiation treatment, and chemotherapy. Two years later, he had locally recurrent disease involving the brachial plexus, neck, and chest wall. The patient's pain was minimally responsive to narcotics, which also caused severe nausea and anorexia. TECHNIQUE: The brachial plexus was localized percutaneously with a needle electrode stimulator. Contrast injection under fluoroscopy confirmed entry into the plexus sheath. With use of the Seldinger technique, two Silastic catheters were placed within the brachial plexus and attached with a "Y" connector to a reservoir. The patient experienced complete relief of upper-extremity pain after a test injection with xylocaine. Thereafter, serial injections of bupivacaine with triamcinolone at 1-week intervals provided complete pain relief. After the treatments were initiated, the patient reported improved sleep and an improvement in his quality of life. CONCLUSION: A catheter reservoir system for brachial plexus analgesia can provide safe and effective analgesia for upper-extremity pain. This technique negates the need for repeated invasive procedures and avoids the complications of neurolysis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/138. guillain-barre syndrome presenting with severe pain: report of one case.

    Most neurologists are familiar with pain in guillain-barre syndrome but some pediatricians may still miss or underestimate it. We report a 10-year-old girl who presented with headache and numbness in lower extremities. On examination, she could walk and showed hyporeflexia, mild muscle weakness, prominent neck rigidity and right facial nerve palsy. headache and pain in neck, low back and calves were so severe that she could not fall asleep and the response to analgesic was very poor. On 8th day of illness, she needed mechanical ventilation and suffered tetraplegia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction including hypertension and sinus tachycardia appeared thereafter and lasted for a week. After receiving a high dose of intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg in 2 days), her condition improved gradually although joint pain persisted for about three weeks. She could walk unaided by day 40 and run by day 70, and recovered completely 6 months later. We emphasize that pain in GBS needs proper evaluation and management in children as well as in adults.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/138. Difficult problems and their solutions in patients with cancer pain of the head and neck areas.

    pain management can be especially difficult in patients with head and neck cancer due to the erosive nature of the neoplasms that invade the region, the rich innervation of the head and neck, and other factors. Consequently, diagnosis is a complex process that cannot be dealt with in a cursory fashion. Furthermore, tumor pain can mimic noncancer conditions, nonmalignant orofacial disorders can be suggestive of tumor growth, and antineoplastic treatment-related conditions can be difficult to distinguish from tumor recurrence. A series of case reports illustrates key elements of diagnosis and pain management in patients with head and neck cancer. These elements include 1) detailed assessment of pain intensity and characteristics; 2) appropriate use of analgesic adjuvant medications; 3) use of diagnostic and therapeutic nerve blocks and myofascial trigger point injections; and 4) a high index of suspicion regarding tumor recurrence pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.