Cases reported "Pain"

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1/62. Interstitial cystitis and the potential role of gabapentin.

    Gabapentin, an antiepileptic agent, is a safe and versatile medication also used in the adjunctive treatment of painful disorders. These include neuropathic pain, such as postherpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, and the pain of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Interstitial cystitis, a painful disease entity, shares many common features of these chronic pain states, and the use of gabapentin can assist in pain control. Gabapentin, as an adjunctive agent, may reduce use of cotherapeutics such as narcotics. Two patients with interstitial cystitis improved functional capacity within their activities of daily living and received adequate pain control with the addition of gabapentin to their medication regimen.
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keywords = postherpetic, neuralgia
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2/62. Treatment of chronic pain by spinal cord stimulation.

    chronic pain after injury of the nervous system is difficult to treat. This report describes our experience in the treatment of chronic pain by spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in four patients (three men and one woman, with ages ranging from 61 to 73 yr). One patient had chronic intractable pain due to a spinal cord injury, one had post-herpetic neuralgia, one had failed back surgery syndrome, and one had brachial plexus and spinal cord injuries. A permanent spinal cord stimulator was implanted in the patient with spinal cord injuries. In the other three patients, a permanent spinal cord stimulator was implanted after a successful trial stimulation with temporarily implanted electrodes. After 19 to 25 months (mean, 21 mo) of follow-up, three patients had satisfactory improvement of pain and one patient had temporary pain relief, but pain recurred two months after implantation. One patient had recurrence of pain after migration of an electrode, and the pain-relieving effects of SCS returned after repositioning the electrode. According to this preliminary experience, SCS is effective for pain reduction in selected patients with chronic pain. Long-term follow-up is mandatory to evaluate the benefits and complications of SCS for relief of chronic pain.
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ranking = 0.1311340697385
keywords = neuralgia
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3/62. Fosphenytoin: an intravenous option for the management of acute trigeminal neuralgia crisis.

    Timely management of trigeminal neuralgia presenting with severe, sustained, crescendo pain can be difficult with oral medications. More rapid pain control often can be achieved using intravenous phenytoin. Fosphenytoin is a phosphate ester prodrug of phenytoin that is significantly better tolerated parenterally than phenytoin in the treatment of epilepsy. Three patients with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to oral medications and presenting with crisis pain were treated urgently with intravenous fosphenytoin. In each case complete relief of pain was achieved for a duration of two days, affording a window of opportunity to modify oral pharmacotherapeutic strategies or to control pain in preparation for invasive neurosurgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.78680441843103
keywords = neuralgia
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4/62. Pelvic distress in the aged patient.

    Unexplained pelvic distress or pain was observed in the 4 patients of this report (3 women and 1 man), and also in 6 other patients during a 10-year period of neurologic practice. In each of the 4 reported cases, the discomfort was interpreted as sexual. It is suggested that this may be a valid entity and that, as with trigeminal neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia, it is truly limited to aged patients. The mechanism, incidence and significance are unknown.
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ranking = 1.1311340697385
keywords = postherpetic, neuralgia
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5/62. Human "autotomy".

    We describe two cases of self-injurious behaviour. One was a man with central post-stroke pain with maximal pain in the tip of the nose, who excavated his ala nasae--in which he subsequently continued to experience phantom pain. The second case a man who, following ophthalmic herpes zoster and possibly mild postherpetic neuralgia. He subsequently scratched his anaesthetic forehead down to the bone, while denying he experienced any pain. We would describe the first case as one of true autotomy; but the second as destruction of an anaesthetic part of the body. The implications for human and animal physiopathology are discussed.
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keywords = postherpetic, neuralgia
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6/62. deep brain stimulation of the centre median-parafascicular complex in patients with movement disorders.

    The centre median-parafascicular (CM-Pf) complex of the thalamus is considered to be a possible target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with movement disorders. In a prospective study on the effect of CM-Pf DBS versus somatosensory thalamic DBS on chronic neuropathic pain, three of 12 patients had additional movement disorders. Bifocal quadripolar electrodes were implanted by computed tomography guided stereotactic surgery under local anaesthesia contralaterally to the side of the pain for test stimulation. Two of the three patients with movement disorders had permanent implantation of CM-Pf electrodes. During test stimulation of the left CM-Pf complex for several days, a 67 year old woman received no benefit with respect to the neuropathic pain, but the choreoathetotic movements of her right foot ceased. As the pain syndrome was not improved, she decided not to have permanent implantation. A 74 year old man with postzoster neuralgia and allodynia enjoyed excellent relief from his pain with chronic CM-Pf DBS. In addition, improvement in the tremor at rest was noted. A 72 year old man had sustained reduction in his stump dyskinesias. Further evaluation of the possible role of the "forgotten" central and medial thalamic nuclei in the treatment of movement disorders may be warranted.
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ranking = 0.1311340697385
keywords = neuralgia
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7/62. Postherpetic neuralgia after shingles: an under-recognized cause of chronic vulvar pain.

    BACKGROUND: Vulvar shingles, an uncommon presentation of a common disease, probably affects 1.5 million American women during their lifetime and leaves about 150,000 with postherpetic neuralgia, a chronic neuropathic pain syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment can minimize pain severity and duration. CASES: The case of an 88-year-old woman with sacral shingles is described. Complications led to her demise. A 35-year-old with a 6-year history of disabling vulvar pain and many diagnostic procedures was ultimately diagnosed with postherpetic neuralgia. CONCLUSION: Shingles needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of vulvar rashes because it is a modifiable risk factor for chronic vulvar pain. The possibility of postherpetic neuralgia must be considered in women with unexplained vulvar dysesthesia.
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ranking = 3.524536278954
keywords = postherpetic, neuralgia
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8/62. Relief of post-herpetic neuralgia by surgical removal of painful skin.

    We present a case of longstanding PHN treated by skin excision of the area of greatest pain (11.3 x 26.0 cm(2)). The operation reduced pain, eliminated tactile allodynia, and facilitated greatly reduced medication use over a 1-year follow-up period. Fourteen punch biopsies and 10 strips of skin (each 10 mm long) from the excised painful PHN skin were qualitatively assessed by double-label immunofluorescence using antibodies against protein-gene-product 9.5 (PGP9.5), 200 kDa neurofilament protein (NF), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR-1). Compared with a punch biopsy from mirror image skin, the pattern of cutaneous innervation in PHN skin was consistently and substantially different. The results may explain the anatomical basis of the capsaicin-response test and have implications for our understanding of clinical mechanisms underlying PHN pain.
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ranking = 0.52453627895402
keywords = neuralgia
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9/62. Sudden onset pharyngeal pain associated with dissecting vertebral artery aneurysm.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We report a case of sudden onset pharyngeal pain due to dissection of the vertebral artery. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old patient presented with sudden onset of unilateral pharyngeal pain, which was first, diagnosed as idiopathic glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance image and cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting vertebral artery aneurysm. The anatomical site of the aneurysm may explain this complication. CONCLUSIONS: Sudden onset of pharyngeal pain, although rare, should be considered as a complication of dissection of the vertebral artery even though there are no other general or neurological symptoms.
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ranking = 0.1311340697385
keywords = neuralgia
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10/62. multiple sclerosis and oral care.

    multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Common early symptoms include visual disturbances, facial pain or trigeminal neuralgia and paraesthesia or numbness of feet, legs, hands and arms. These, plus symptoms of spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. Increasingly a multi-disciplinary team approach is used where the individual, if appropriate his/her carer, and the specialist nurse are key figures. The dental team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health.
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ranking = 0.1311340697385
keywords = neuralgia
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