Cases reported "Pain"

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1/42. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with classic presentation of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and subsequent improvement with targeted epidural blood patch. methods: Report of one case and review of the literature. RESULTS: Examination of cerebrospinal fluid after lumbar puncture disclosed a reduced opening pressure, an increased level of protein, and lymphocytic pleocytosis. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium showed diffuse enhancement of the pachymeninges, no evidence of leptomeningeal enhancement, and chronic subdural fluid collection. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated reduced activity over the cerebral convexities, early accumulation of radiotracer in the urinary bladder, and direct evidence of leakage at the cervicothoracic junction (C7-T1). Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Therapy with a targeted epidural blood patch resulted in the rapid resolution of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In this report, we describe a classic case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension in a 63-year-old man with an initial presentation of postural headaches, blurred vision, pain in the left eye, diplopia on left gaze, and neck soreness.
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2/42. Copperhead envenomations: clinical profiles of three different subspecies.

    Copperhead envenomation cases reported in the literature frequently lack identification of the subspecies of copperhead responsible for the envenomation. Whether subspecific identity would be useful in predicting possible different toxicity profiles may have clinical relevance. We report here the clinical profiles from envenomations involving 3 different subspecies of captive adult copperhead snakes--the southern copperhead (agkistrodon contortrix contortrix), the northern copperhead (agkistrodon contortrix mokasen), and the broad-banded copperhead (agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus). The bites occurred in the north-central region of the US where none of these subspecies are endemic and involved a professional and 2 amateur herpetologists. The victims were adult males with no previous history of venomous snake bite, and all bites were evidenced by fang puncture marks to their index finger or thumb. Envenomations from the broad-banded and northern copperhead subspecies caused localized symptoms of pain, edema and ecchymosis. In addition to these symptoms, southern copperhead envenomation resulted in a more severe clinical toxicity profile as evidenced by propulsive emesis, diarrhea and hematuria. Whether these differences in observed clinical toxicity were the result of unique subspecific venom pharmacological actions is an interesting question. However, independent of the copperhead subspecies involved, conservative medical management was effective in each case.
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3/42. Pitfall: a pseudo tumor within the left liver lobe presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and severe weight loss.

    A 51 year old male patient with a history of chronic alcohol consumption and recurrent pancreatitis was referred to our hospital with jaundice, epigastric pain, severe diarrhoea and weight loss of 28 kg within the last 12 months. A CT scan of the abdomen 4 months before admission had shown a pancreatitis with free fluid around the corpus and tail of the pancreas as well as dilated intrahepatic bile ducts and a cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Moreover, a tumor (3.5 x 3.0 x 3.6 cm) with irregular contrast enhancement was seen within the left liver lobe. The patient was referred to us for further evaluation and treatment. The initial B-Mode sonogram revealed a bull's eye like well defined lesion (8.1 x 7.5 x 7.0 cm) within the left liver lobe, consistent with a tumour or abscess. Prior to a diagnostic needle biopsy a PTCD was performed in this case presenting with dilated intrahepatic bile ducts and having a history of Billroth II operation. An additional colour coded Duplex Doppler ultrasonography demonstrated a visceral artery aneurysm and prevented us from performing the diagnostic puncture. The aneurysm was assumed to originate from a variant or a branch of the left hepatic artery. angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery and coil embolization was performed because of the increasing size and the risk of a bleeding complication. Postinterventional colour duplex ultrasound measurement showed no blood flow within the aneurysm. Retrospectively, the pseudoaneurysm must have led to a compression of the common bile duct, since the patient did not develop cholestasis after embolization and removal of the PTCD. Thus, a pseudoaneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery must be included in the differential diagnosis of liver tumours in patients with chronic pancreatitis, despite its unusual localization near the liver. Therefore, we suggest that colour coded ultrasonography should be applied to any unclear, bull's eye like lesion, even though this method alone cannot exactly determine the origin of the pseudoaneurysm. Interventional angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and therapy of visceral artery aneurysm.
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4/42. sucrose as analgesia for neonates experiencing "mild" pain.

    health care professionals who care for neonates have few treatment options for the management of mild, sporadic painful events, such as those associated with venipuncture. A number of research studies have demonstrated sucrose to be an efficacious analgesic for mild procedural pain in neonates. The historical therapy of the "sugar nipple" has even been replaced with sucrose. A discussion of the pharmacologic principles, available research regarding dose-response relationships and implications for nursing care is presented in this article to allow the reader to consider how this adjunctive therapy may be incorporated into care of the neonate. Rather than considering sucrose as a replacement for traditional analgesics, this easily administered and seemingly safe intervention could be used as another adjunctive therapy in treating mild pain for neonates. Future directions of research may identify the precise mechanism of action that sucrose takes in the neonate, the gestational and chronological ages when sucrose is most efficacious, and the consequences of frequent or repeated dosing with term and low birth weight infants.
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5/42. arm pain as an unusual presentation of postdural puncture intracranial hypotension.

    Implications: We report a case of a patient experiencing severe arm pain after dural puncture. This complication has not been reported previously. The patient was successfully treated with an epidural patch.
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6/42. Persistent paraplegia after an aqueous 7.5% phenol solution to the anterior motor root for intercostal neurolysis: a case report.

    A 55-year-old white man with severe scoliosis and chest deformity was scheduled for an intercostal neurolysis for pain relief with 7.5% aqueous phenol solution. A 20 G needle was inserted 3 to 4cm lateral to the midline of the spine under the 10th right rib. After negative aspiration for blood and alcohol, 6mL of a 7.5% aqueous phenol solution was injected. Within a minute after the injection, the patient felt a warm sensation in his right leg, followed by loss of leg motor and sensory function on both sides. A lumbar puncture done 3.5 hours after the block showed a phenol concentration of 87.5 microg/mL. The most likely explanation is a diffusion of the phenol through the intervertebral foraminae reaching the spinal space and therefore damaging the motor and sensory roots. This case highlights the danger associated with phenol application in the vicinity of the spinal cord.
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7/42. Medical acupuncture enhances standard wilderness medical care: a case study from the Inca Trail, Machu Picchu, peru, April 2, 1997.

    This case report shows the integration of medical acupuncture into the standard medical care of a wilderness emergency situation. Despite conventional medical attention, a trekker suffering from an extremely painful conjunctivitis continued to suffer severe eye pain. The addition of medical acupuncture to his care resolved his eye pain promptly, enabling him to continue his trekking activities without further distress. acupuncture has many potential applications to enhance the effects of standard medical care in wilderness and third world travel settings.
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ranking = 7
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8/42. blood patch for spinal headache. A recurrence and a complication.

    The management of a patient is described who has a blood patch for spinal headache, but who had a recurrence of symptoms 1 day later which was successfully treated by a second patch. A second case is described in which there was a second dural puncture immediately prior to the blood patch and, immediately following the blood patch, the patient complained of severe debilitating 'paralysing' pain in both legs. This pain was of short duration and the blood patch was successful. Some further observations on the use of a blood patch are recorded.
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9/42. Infected compartment syndrome after acupuncture.

    We present a case of septicaemia and compartment syndrome of the leg in a diabetic patient, following acupuncture to his calf. An emergency decompression fasciotomy was performed on the patient and gram-positive cocci were grown from the posterior compartment wound swab cultures and group A streptococcus from his blood cultures. He remained in the Intensive Therapy Unit postoperatively, requiring inotropic support and intravenous antibiotics for his septicaemia. We would like to remind acupuncturists, to consider the possibility of heightened risks in immunocompromised patients.
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10/42. Galactorrhoea following acupuncture.

    A 41-year-old woman with breast cancer was referred to the pain management clinic for a course of acupuncture for intense pain following a subcutaneous mastectomy and a latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction. She was treated with a standard course of acupuncture for breast pain, using paravertebral segmental points, trigger points, plus contralateral L14 on the non-lymphoedematous arm. She experienced an episode of galactorrhoea six days following the first treatment and during the second treatment. She had not previously lactated for four years. CT and MRI of the brain revealed no focal abnormality. acupuncture has been used in to promote lactation in the Traditional Chinese literature using the 'Tianzong' acupoint SI11. This acupoint coincided with a trigger point over infraspinatus that was included in the neurophysiologically based acupuncture treatment. Quantitative analysis has shown an increase in the production of prolactin and oxytocin following acupuncture. These hormones are involved in the synthesis and release of milk from mammary glands respectively. This is the first report of galactorrhoea, in the contralateral normal breast, following acupuncture in a patient with breast cancer.
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ranking = 10
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