Cases reported "Pain"

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1/68. Incomplete nondisplaced tibial osteotomy for treatment of osteoarthritic knee pain.

    Intraosseous venous hypertension is considered a significant factor in the production of knee pain secondary to degenerative arthrosis, thus vascular decompression by means of tibial osteotomy is a rational option for treatment of selected patients. A preliminary report is presented of six patients with symptoms of primary or secondary degenerative arthrosis who were treated by incomplete nondisplaced proximal tibial osteotomy with good or excellent results. These patients were refractory to nonoperative treatment and were not deemed suitable candidates for angulated osteotomy, arthroscopic surgery alone, or total knee arthroplasty. patients ranged in age from 36 to 61 years (mean age: 47 years). Follow-up ranged from .8 to 6.7 years (mean: 3.1 years). The subjects were studied postoperatively by interview, physical examination, radiographs, and bone scans. Results were assessed using the knee rating system of The Hospital for Special Surgery.
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2/68. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the fourth metatarsal.

    Chondromyxoid fibroma is a rare benign tumor that is typically found in the metaphyseal ends of long tubular bones, such as the tibia. The authors describe a case of this neoplasm occurring in the foot. Treatment included complete resection with reconstruction using an autogenous fibular bone graft. The surgical technique and the advantages of using a fibular bone graft are discussed.
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3/68. A ganglion cyst causing lumbar radiculopathy in a baseball pitcher: a case report.

    This report describes a case of a professional baseball pitcher who developed acute left lumbar radicular symptoms after a baseball game and was subsequently sidelined for the rest of the season. physical examination revealed depressed reflexes in the left posterior tibialis and left medial hamstring muscles, mild weakness in the left extensor hallucis longus, and positive dural tension signs. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an ovoid mass at the L4-L5 level, causing compression of the dura. Surgical resection of the mass resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Pathology revealed that the mass was a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst is a rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with lumbar radiculopathy fails to respond to conservative treatment.
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keywords = tibia
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4/68. Acute arterial thrombosis with antithrombin iii deficiency in nephrotic syndrome: report of a case.

    nephrotic syndrome frequently causes venous thromboembolic complications. Arterial thrombosis has rarely been reported and is mainly observed in children. Only six cases of lower extremity arterial thrombosis in adults have been reported in the literature. The outcome in these cases was unsatisfactory because of the high rates of limb loss and recurrence of thrombosis. We report successful treatment of a 39-year-old man who suffered from right lower extremity arterial thrombosis associated with decreased levels of serum antithrombin III. He was admitted to our hospital with severe pain in his right foot. No pulse was palpable in his right dorsalis pedis or posterior tibial arteries. His right foot was cold and mottled, with a reduced sensation and motor activity. The laboratory data revealed a serum total protein concentration of 3.9g/dl and an albumin concentration of 1.5 g/dl. The coagulation profile showed a fibrinogen level of 879 mg/dl and antithrombin III value of 9.5%. Right lower extremity arteriography showed a complete occlusion of the right deep femoral artery and popliteal artery, and a filling defect in the common femoral artery. An emergency thrombectomy was performed under general anesthesia. The patient was treated successfully, and surgical treatment was followed by anticoagulant therapy with 1,000 units of antithrombin III. A renal biopsy revealed histologic evidence of minimal change of glomerulonephritis. He was discharged 3 months later, and no recurrence of thrombosis has yet been observed.
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keywords = tibia
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5/68. Localized pigmented villonodular synovitis as a rare cause of chronic anterolateral ankle pain in an equestrienne.

    An unusual case of localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the ankle as a rare cause of chronic anterolateral ankle pain in a 16-year-old horsewoman is presented. Intra-articular nodular forms of pigmented villonodular synovitis can only be diagnosed arthroscopically, macroscopic and microscopic aspects being typical. We believe that this lesion is more likely a reactive process secondary to repetitive microtrauma rather than a true neoplasm. Our patient presented with pathology in the left ankle, the side by which one mounts and dismounts a horse, forcing, in both activities, ankle dorsiflexion. Moreover, an English saddle was used by our patient, upon which one rides with the ankle maintained in dorsiflexion. At arthroscopy, the soft-tissue mass was seen to be entrapped in the joint between the talus and the tibia at dorsiflexion of the ankle. This had caused a slowly progressive enlargement of the lesion because of fibrosis resulting from reactive inflammation associated with this repetitive microtrauma, thus causing irritation, pain, and synovitis due to impingement.
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keywords = tibia
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6/68. Tibialis posterior myofascial tightness as a source of heel pain: diagnosis and treatment.

    STUDY DESIGN: We report 2 cases in which a novel tibialis posterior muscle stretch is used to treat heel pain and lower extremity impairment. OBJECTIVES: To explore dysfunction of the tibialis posterior as a source of heel pain. BACKGROUND: heel pain is a common symptom of orthopaedic dysfunction of the lower extremity. Tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction is well documented in the medical and surgical literature, but its identification in its early or precursive stages has received little attention. methods AND MEASURES: An examination and treatment outline, incorporating a novel assessment and stretching technique, is presented. RESULTS: We identified a stage of dysfunction of the tibialis posterior ("Pre-Stage 1") without clinically identifiable tendon pathology. We refer to this as tibialis posterior myofascial tightness (TPMT). CONCLUSION: Tibialis posterior myofascial tightness is a clinical entity that may be differentially diagnosed in cases of heel pain and specifically treated.
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7/68. Cutaneous and mixed nerve silent periods in syringomyelia.

    OBJECTIVES AND methods: We studied cutaneous and mixed nerve silent periods (CSP, MNSP) in 4 patients with cervical syringomyelia documented by magnetic resonance imaging who on clinical examination presented with unilateral hypalgesia and hypothermesthesia. In addition, we recorded upper and lower extremity somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SEP, MEP), and cortical silent periods. RESULTS: In all patients, CSP and the later portion of MNSP were absent or shortened on their affected side, while both were normal on their unaffected side. In all patients, SEP latencies were normal following both median and tibial nerve stimulation. In two patients, the amplitude N13 (median nerve SEP), and in one patient each the amplitudes N20 (median nerve SEP) and P37 (tibial nerve SEP) were reduced. Central motor conduction time was prolonged to abductor digiti minimi muscle in one patient on the affected side, but was normal to tibialis anterior muscle in all patients. Cortical silent periods where present bilaterally in spite of unilateral complete absence of CSP and MNSP in two subjects tested. Loss of CSP and MNSP were a sensitive parameter of spinal cord dysfunction in syringomyelia. The cervical median nerve SEP response N13 reflected gray matter involvement, while corticospinal tract dysfunction was less frequently observed. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that CSP and later portion of MNSP are generated at the spinal level by the same small myelinated A-delta fibers, and that their central network is distinct from large diameter fiber afferents and efferents.
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8/68. Differential diagnosis and treatment of subcalcaneal heel pain: a case report.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the examination and intervention strategy utilized in the differential diagnosis and treatment of a patient with subcalcaneal heel pain. BACKGROUND: The patient was a 44-year-old man with an 8-month history of left subcalcaneal heel pain. He presented with a chief complaint of limited standing and walking tolerance secondary to pain in the left heel. He had not responded to previous treatments of rest, anti-inflammatory medication, cortisone injections, and exercise prescription. MATERIALS AND methods: The patient's subcalcaneal heel pain was reproduced utilizing the straight leg raise (SLR) in combination with ankle dorsiflexion and eversion to sensitize the tibial nerve. These findings suggested a neurogenic component to the dysfunction. Because restricted ankle dorsiflexion, excessive pronation, and posterior tibialis weakness were also found, mechanical dysfunctions also likely contributed to the etiology of heel pain. The patient was treated for 10 visits over a period of 1 month. Treatment consisted of active and passive motions aimed at restoring pain-free soft-tissue motion along the course of the tibial nerve. In addition, low-dye taping and therapeutic exercises were utilized to control excessive pronation and reduce stress on the plantar structures of the foot. RESULTS: The patient's SLR increased from 42 degrees to 54 degrees and became pain-free. Dorsiflexion range of motion increased from 3 degrees to 8 degrees in the left ankle, and left posterior tibialis strength was normalized. Over a period of 1 month the patient's symptoms were resolved, and his standing and walking tolerance was fully restored. CONCLUSION: Assessment and potential contribution of neural dysfunction should be considered in patients with subcalcaneal heel pain.
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9/68. Combined percutaneous endovascular and open surgical approach in the treatment of a persistent sciatic artery aneurysm presenting with acute limb-threatening ischemia--a case report and review of the literature.

    Persistent sciatic artery (PSA) is a continuation of the internal iliac artery into the popliteal-tibial vessels and provides the major supply to the lower limb bud in early embryologic development, and its remnants participate in the formation of the inferior gluteal, deep femoral, popliteal, peroneal, and pedal vessels. When the femoral artery develops, the PSA involutes. In rare circumstances it persists and has a bilateral location in 22% of cases of PSA. This rare vascular anomaly is associated with aneurysmal formation in 15% to 46% of cases. Persistent sciatic artery aneurysm (PSAA) was first described in 1864. At present 87 cases, including this case, have been reported in the international literature. The authors describe a patient affected with PSAA and treated with a combination of thrombolysis, arterial reconstruction, and aneurysm embolization in a staged fashion. embryology, anatomy, pathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare disease are briefly discussed.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = tibia
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10/68. Tibial plafond fractures. How do these ankles function over time?

    BACKGROUND: The intermediate outcome of fractures of the tibial plafond treated with current techniques has not been reported, to our knowledge. The purpose of this study, performed at a minimum of five years after injury, was to determine the effect of these fractures on ankle function, pain, and general health status and to determine which factors predict favorable and unfavorable outcomes. methods: Fifty-six ankles (fifty-two patients) with a tibial plafond fracture were treated with a uniform technique consisting of application of a monolateral hinged transarticular external fixator coupled with screw fixation of the articular surface. Thirty-one patients with thirty-five involved ankles returned between five and twelve years after the injury for a physical examination, assessment of ankle pain and function with the iowa ankle Score and ankle osteoarthritis Scale, assessment of general health status with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), and radiographic examination of the ankle. RESULTS: arthrodesis had been performed on five of the forty ankles for which the outcome was known at a minimum of five years after the injury. Other than removal of prominent screws (two patients), no other surgical procedure had been performed on any patient. The average iowa ankle Score was 78 points (range, 28 to 96 points). The scores on the SF-36 and ankle osteoarthritis Scale demonstrated a long-term negative effect of the injury on general health and on ankle pain and function when compared with those parameters in age-matched controls. The degree of osteoarthrosis was grade 0 in three ankles, grade 1 in six, grade 2 in twenty, and grade 3 in six. The majority of patients had some limitation with regard to recreational activities, with an inability to run being the most common complaint (twenty-seven of the thirty-one patients). Fourteen patients changed jobs because of the ankle injury. Fifteen ankles were rated by the patient as excellent; ten, as good; seven, as fair; and one, as poor. Nine patients with previously recorded ankle scores had better scores after the longer follow-up interval. The patients perceived that their condition had improved for an average of 2.4 years after the injury. CONCLUSIONS: Although tibial plafond fractures have an intermediate-term negative effect on ankle function and pain and on general health, few patients require secondary reconstructive procedures and symptoms tend to decrease for a long time after healing.
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