Cases reported "Palatal Neoplasms"

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1/82. Extranodal follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the palate.

    Follicular dendritic cell tumors are uncommon and usually occur in lymph nodes. We report the case of a follicular dendritic cell tumor that occurred in the palate of a 14-year-old boy and manifested itself as a nodular mass. Histologically, the neoplasm consisted of spindle-shaped or oval-shaped cells with eosinophilic cytoplasms and nuclei with delicate, dispersed chromatin. The lesional cells were principally arranged in diffuse, fascicular patterns with vaguely whorled or storiform areas. Focal multinucleate tumor giant cells and lymphocytes were observed throughout the neoplasm. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for the follicular dendritic cell markers CD21, CD35, and CD23 and for S-100 protein, CD68, and muscle-specific actin. Tumor cells were negative for LCA, CD20, EMA, CK (AE1/AE3), HMB45, and CD34. lymphocytes were positive for LCA and CD45RO. Although follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a very uncommon tumor, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of tumors in this location.
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2/82. Mixed-type liposarcoma of the oral cavity: a case with unusual features and a long survival.

    A case of mixed-type liposarcoma, which showed unusual dedifferentiation in the recurrence, is reported. The rapidly growing mass in the palate of a 60-year-old Japanese woman first revealed a combination of myxoid liposarcoma with features resembling storiform malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The recurrent neoplasm, showing an abrupt transition between myxoid and non-lipogenic parts, partially reverted to sclerosing well-differentiated liposarcoma. The patient died 10.1 years after the first operation.
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3/82. A case of metastasizing pleomorphic adenoma.

    The pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign salivary neoplasm. A case is presented in which a palatal pleomorphic adenoma seeded a metastasis in the medullary cavity of the anterior maxilla, apparently by hematogenous spread after surgical manipulation.
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4/82. Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma of the oral cavity.

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) is a neoplasm arising most commonly within the minor salivary glands of the oral cavity. Not recognized as a distinct entity until 1983, PLGA was often misdiagnosed as adenoid cystic carcinoma or pleomorphic adenoma. PLGA is thought to be the second most common salivary gland tumor after mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Affecting individuals later in life, PLGA often presents as a firm, painless nodule that exhibits a locally aggressive, infiltrative pattern. Because of PLGA's slow growth rate and low rate of metastasis, differentiation from other disease entities is crucial for treatment modalities. The study presented here reviews three cases of PLGA, their treatment and follow-up.
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5/82. Metastatic tumors in the sellar and parasellar regions: clinical review of four cases.

    Metastatic tumors in the sellar and parasellar regions are uncommon and rarely detected in clinical practice. We present four cases of sellar and parasellar metastatic tumors, which metastasized from distant organ in one case and extended directly from adjacent structures in three. Common presenting symptoms were cranial neuropathies, headache and facial pain. Invasion into the cavernous sinus was noted in all cases. We report rare cases of sellar and parasellar metastases. Also, we should consider the possibility of metastasis in these regions for patients who showed the above clinical presentations in systemic cancer patients. In extensive diseases, transient symptomatic relief could be obtained by direct surgical management, even in restricted degree.
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6/82. Free flap closure in complex congenital and acquired defects of the palate.

    Extensive palatal defects cause substantial morbidity, including nasal regurgitation, poor oral hygiene, loose-fitting obturators, and difficulty with speech. Microvascular techniques allow the surgeon to repair these complex defects with a one-stage reconstruction, in contrast to possible multistage local or regional flap reconstruction. In this retrospective review, the authors present their 5-year experience with free flap coverage of extensive palatal defects. From 1993 to 1998, 6 patients underwent free flap coverage of large palatal defects. The etiology of the large palatal defects included trauma (N = 1), neoplasm (N = 4), and a recurrent congenital cleft palatal fistula (N = 1). Three patients underwent osteocutaneous radial forearm flaps and 1 patient underwent a fasciocutaneous radial forearm flap. The remaining 2 patients underwent rectus abdominis muscle flaps. The ipsilateral facial artery and vein were used as the recipient vessels in all patients. There were no intraoperative complications (surgical or anesthetic). Postoperatively, 2 patients had surgical evacuation of small flap hematomas. One patient underwent revision of the fasciocutaneous flap. All flaps survived. In our experience, the benefits of free flap reconstruction of complex palatal fistulas seem to outweigh the risks of the operation, with reliable long-term results.
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7/82. Abrikossoff's tumor.

    Abrikossoff's tumor is a disease that more commonly affects the oral cavity but can also occur at other sites. It develops between the second and sixth decades of life, more frequently among women and blacks. The neoplasm can affect all parts of the body. The head and neck areas are affected in 45% to 65% of cases and of these, 70% are located interorally (tongue, oral mucosa, hard palate). The benign form shows polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm and small nuclei. The malignant form, however, is associated with a high mitotic index and pleomorphic cellular tissue. The clinical aspect of the neoformation is a swelling covered by mucus of normal appearance. Studies of the neoformation show that in addition to the objective examination, further instrumental research is necessary, i.e., with nuclear magnetic resonance or computed tomography with contrast CT scan. However, the only examination that can confirm the clinical diagnosis is the histological examination. The only treatment for Abrikossoff tumor is surgery. The surgical treatment provides for an extirpation of the neoformation with the overhanging mucus and the underlying periosteum. In this work, the authors discuss a case of Abrikossoff tumor affecting the mucus of the right side of the hemipalate in a 53-year-old patient and present a review of the literature.
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8/82. Glomus tumour of the hard palate: case report and review.

    Glomus tumours are usually small benign neoplasms that occur in the dermis or subcutaneous tissues of the extremities. They are rare in the oral cavity, only 18 cases having been reported in the medical journals to our knowledge. They arise from the epithelioid glomus cells that normally reside in the stratum retinaculare corii of the skin and are concerned with temperature regulation. We report the clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of a case of glomus tumour of the hard palate.
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9/82. Radiosensitive hemangiopericytoma in the soft palate.

    Hemangiopericytomas are uncommon neoplasms of vascular origin, and rarely arise in the pharynx. We report a case of a 78-year-old female with hemangiopericytoma in her soft palate exhibiting prominent radiosensitivity. Hemangiopericytomas are considered to be radioresistant and wide local excision is a treatment of choice, but their nature is widely variable. In treating aggressive hemangiopericytomas, radiation therapy can be selected.
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10/82. Successful antiangiogenic therapy of giant cell angioblastoma with interferon alfa 2b: report of 2 cases.

    We describe 2 cases of angioblastoma, a rare, destructive pediatric tumor, treated with interferon alfa 2b (IFNalpha2b). The first patient is a 10-month-old male who presented with an ulcerated palatal neoplasm that could not be completely resected. The second is a male neonate with a congenital tumor of the right hand that invaded the hypothenar eminence, destroying the fourth and fifth metacarpals. biopsy in both patients was interpreted as giant cell angioblastoma. Angioblastoma is rare; there is only 1 reported case that necessitated amputation of an upper extremity, also initially recommended for our patient. Because there is little experience with chemotherapy, permission was granted to employ an antiangiogenic regimen of IFNalpha2b. The angiogenic protein, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), was abnormally elevated in both patients. Both patients received IFNalpha2b. In the first child, it was used after incomplete resection, because biopsy-proven tumor was present at the margin and in the nasopharynx. Biopsies 15 months after initiation of IFN2alphab were negative for tumor. Therapy was stopped after 3 years. Eighteen months later, the patient remains disease-free. In the second child, IFNalpha2b was started after debridement of the ulcerated tumor. Over 11 months, the tumor completely regressed and there was bony regeneration of the metacarpals. The fifth digit was amputated because of damage to the metacarpophalangeal joint by the tumor. IFNalpha2b therapy was discontinued after 1 year of treatment, and the child remains disease-free 2 years and 8 months later. In conclusion, this report demonstrates that: 1) a bFGF-overexpressing low-grade tumor can respond to IFNalpha2b in a manner similar to life-threatening infantile hemangiomas, 2) urinary bFGF levels can help guide IFNalpha dosage in such patients, and 3) although bFGF-mediated tumor angiogenesis is inhibited by IFNalpha, physiologic angiogenesis seems to be unaffected.
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