Cases reported "Pancreatic Pseudocyst"

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1/105. Operative indications for cystic lesions of the pancreas with malignant potential--our experience.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: There are still many important but unclear points regarding the differential diagnosis and operative indications of cystic lesions of the pancreas with malignant potential. Studies of the clinicopathological and molecular biological characteristics of such diseases are necessary. In this paper, we discuss operative indications for this condition based on a review of the literature and our own experience. METHODOLOGY: Seven cases of serous cystadenoma and 9 cases of mucinous cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas that were operated on or autopsied in our department from 1980 to 1996 were analyzed clinicopathologically. Small cystic lesions incidentally found in 300 autopsied cases were also studied. Finally, mucin-producing tumors described in several reports were reviewed, and the branch type of this tumor was especially investigated. RESULTS: A marked disappearance of pancreatic acini in the upstream pancreas was found when serous cystadenoma became large. Papillary projection was histologically found in all of the cases. Tumorous invasion to the interstitium was suspected in tumors more than 5 cm in diameter, and malignancy was reported when tumors were larger than 6 cm. As for mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, the patients had a poor prognosis. In 2 of 42 cases with a pseudocyst, small duct cell carcinoma was incidentally found adjacent to the pseudocyst on the duodenal side. With regard to branch-type intraductal papillary neoplasm, 80% of the tumors larger than 4 cm were malignant. Most of the small cystic lesions found in elderly autopsy cases were accompanied by hyperplastic epithelia without evidence of malignancy. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our experience, an operation should be considered and resection is recommended under the following circumstances: 1) cystic lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas in middle-aged women; 2) typical serous cystadenoma larger than 4 cm; 3) mucinous cystadenoma of any size; 4) branch-type intraductal papillary neoplasm larger than about 3 cm; and, 5) pseudocysts of unknown cause. Small cystic lesions in elderly patients should not necessarily be operated on, but should be followed-up carefully.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/105. Acute hemorrhage into the peritoneal cavity--a complication of chronic pancreatitis with pseudocyst: a case report from clinical practice.

    Acute hemorrhage due to a pseudocyst of the pancreas is a dangerous complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Without operative treatment, mortality is as high as 90%. Immediate recognition of this complication as well as urgent operative treatment allowing the survival of 70% of patients is imperative. Described is the case of a patient with CP and pseudocyst in which hyperamylasemia and unclarified anemia developed following sudden abdominal pain. The suspicion of hemorrhage into the peritoneal cavity was confirmed by selective visceral angiography showing hemorrhage from the splenic artery in the region of the hilus of the spleen. Operative treatment was successful. During the procedure, a ligature was applied to the hemorrhaging splenic artery and a splenectomy was carried out with 2500 ml of bloody contents being removed from the abdominal cavity. Acute hemorrhage into the peritoneal cavity as a complication of chronic pancreatitis with pseudocyst (CPP) requires immediate identification, confirmation by visceral angiography, and urgent operative treatment.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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3/105. Nonoperative management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Problems in differential diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: The evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesions entails a misdiagnosis risk. awareness of the problem, knowledge of the natural history of these lesions, and meticulous posttreatment follow-up can reduce the consequences of diagnostic errors. If all these precautions are adopted, pancreatic pseudocysts can be safely treated nonoperatively. BACKGROUND: The accurate diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions remains a problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence of and the reasons the diagnostic errors occurred in a series of pseudocysts drained percutaneously and to compare these data to those reported in the literature. methods: Data from 70 patients bearing one or more pseudocysts who underwent a percutaneous drainage were reviewed. The pretreatment workup included medical history, physical examination, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) scans, amylase assay in both the serum and the cystic fluid, culture and cytology of the cystic fluid. After removal of the drainage, the minimum follow-up period was 12 mo. RESULTS: Four patients died, and two cancer-associated pseudocysts were identified before removal of the drainage. Sixty-four patients were followed up for a mean of 51.9 mo (range 12-154 mo). A third cancer and a mucinous cystic tumor, fully communicating with the main duct, were further detected during this period.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = operative
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4/105. Proximal bile duct stricture caused by a pancreatic pseudocyst: intra-operative placement of a metallic stent.

    A 61 year-old man presented with a proximal bile duct stricture caused by a pancreatic pseudocyst, which is of rare occurrence. Although it could not be determined pre-operatively whether the lesion was caused by cholangiocarcinoma or inflammatory disease, a laparotomy revealed that the proximal extrahepatic bile duct was surrounded and constricted by a pancreatic pseudocyst extending into the hepatoduodenal ligament. Since the stricture was not relieved only by removing the contents of the pseudocyst and surgical biliary diversion was considered too difficult, a self-expandable metallic stent was placed intra-operatively, at the strictured site, under ultrasonic guidance, via the transhepatic approach. The post-operative course of the patient was uneventful, and he remains well 22 months after the operation. The intra-operative placement of a metallic stent into the biliary tract can be an alternative option in the relief of biliary obstruction.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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5/105. Management of severe acute pancreatitis with a somatostatin analog in a patient undergoing surgery for dissecting thoracic aneurysm: report of a case.

    A patient who was admitted to our hospital to undergo surgery for a dissecting thoracic aneurysm suffered preoperatively from severe acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocysts. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated the presence of new fluid collection around the cyst with the absence of pancreatic necrosis. He was given a somatostatin analog (sandostatin), which was effective in decreasing the abdominal symptoms, leukocyte counts, and the serum C-reactive/protein level. A CT scan revealed that the pancreatic pseudocyst and peripancreatic fluid collection had disappeared. Although somatostatin has been reported to be ineffective for acute pancreatitis with necrosis, pancreatitis without necrosis may regress after treatment with sandostatin. This is probably due to its suppressive effect on the exocrine function, thus resulting in a decrease of pancreatic juice infiltration.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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6/105. Laparoscopic cystogastrostomy for pancreatic pseudocyst is safe and effective.

    Between March 1997 and March 1998, three consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic cystogastrostomy for persistent giant retrogastric pancreatic pseudocyst complicating an attack of acute pancreatitis. The mean cyst diameter was 15 /- 1 cm (range 14-16). The procedure was performed with four trocars. The anterior wall of the stomach was opened longitudinally. The pseudocyst was entered through the posterior wall of the stomach. A cystogastrostomy was created by suturing the margins of the communication by interrupted nonabsorbable sutures. The mean operative time was 123 /- 15 min, and there were no postoperative complications. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4 /- 1 days. Computed tomography demonstrated complete resolution of the pseudocyst. Laparoscopic cystogastrostomy represents a good therapeutic option for persistent retrogastric pancreatic pseudocyst.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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7/105. Massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    Massive bleeding from a pancreatic pseudocyst is a rare condition that poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A 36-yr-old woman presented with acute pancreatitis due to gallstones. Twenty-two days later, she developed severe abdominal pain and hypotension. CT scan revealed hemorrhage into a pancreatic pseudocyst and a large amount of free blood in the peritoneal cavity. At laparotomy, 8 L of blood was evacuated from the peritoneal cavity and 14 units of blood were transfused. The gastroduodenal artery was found to be the cause of the bleeding and was undersewn. A pancreatic necrosectomy was performed and the cavity was packed. The packs were removed the following day. Postoperatively, pancreatic collections were aspirated under ultrasound guidance on three occasions. She was discharged 50 days after admission and had an open cholecystectomy 1 month later. She remains well 1 yr after surgery.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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8/105. Use of disposable stapler in operative cystogastrostomy for pancreatic pseudocyst.

    surgical stapling techniques are widely used in gastrointestinal surgery. These procedures are excellent in convenience and safety. We describe here a new practical application of the surgical disposable stapler, Auto Suture Premium Plus CEEA 34 circular stapler, for the operative drainage of a large symptomatic pancreatic pseudocyst. A 68 year-old man underwent an operative cystogastrostomy using this instrument. His post-operative recovery was uneventful. He is free from symptoms, and abdominal tomography shows complete disappearance of the cystic cavity. We believe that this is the first clinical paper that reports on the stapled cystogastrostomy. This instrument is very useful for creating a stapled cystogastrostomy, similar to one created in the standard open approach.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = operative
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9/105. Infected pancreatic pseudocysts with colonic fistula formation successfully managed by endoscopic drainage alone: report of two cases.

    Fistulization of pancreatic pseudocysts into surrounding viscera is a well-known phenomenon and usually requires surgical management. We report two cases of pancreatic pseudocysts that developed spontaneous fistulas to the colon with resulting fever and abdominal pain. The patients were managed nonoperatively with a combination of endoscopic drainage and antibiotics, and their pseudocysts and fistulas resolved. The patients have remained symptom-free for a mean of 14 months of follow-up.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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10/105. Two cases of chronic pancreatitis with pseudocyst complicated by obstructive jaundice.

    We recently treated two cases of chronic pancreatitis with obstructive jaundice due to compression of the common bile duct by pancreatic pseudocyst. The two cases were males admitted with the complaint of icteric skin color. The first, a 46-year-old male, admitted with the complaint of icteric skin color. He was treated by operative cystojejunostomy after percutaneous drainage of the pseudocyst and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. The other case was a 58 year-old male who admitted with the complaint of icteric skin color. He had an infected pseudocyst in the pancreas and was endoscopically treated. Both of them were discharged with favorable clinical course and normal laboratory findings after the treatment. The former patient remained well 11 months after treatment, but the latter patient died from necrotizing pancreatitis and septic shock 6 months after treatment. Most cases of obstructive jaundice associated with pseudocysts appear to be due to fibrotic stricture of the intrapancreatic portion of the common bile duct rather than due to compression of the bile duct by the pseudocyst. In a patient with secondary pancreatic infection or obstructive jaundice following pancreatic disease, differentiating between these two conditions is an important aspect of accurate diagnosis and therapy. Herein we report two unusual cases of chronic pancreatitis with pseudocyst complicated by obstructive jaundice.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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