Cases reported "Pancreatitis"

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1/11. Anomalous pancreaticobiliary union and chronic pancreatitis: rare presentation with biliary peritonitis.

    Anomalous pancreaticobiliary union (APBU) has varied presentations. We report the case of a 12-year-old female who presented with biliary peritonitis due to a perforation of the common bile duct due to impaction of a pancreatic calculus at the duodenal papilla. She had a long common-biliary channel and pancreas divisum with chronic calcific pancreatitis involving the pancreatic head and neck. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case in the literature.
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keywords = calculus
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2/11. Acute pancreatitis after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a renal calculus.

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently considered the standard treatment for most renal and upper ureteral calculi. The complication rates with ESWL have been reported to be low, resulting in its widespread acceptance and use. However, as the technique has become more widely available, serious complications as a result of injury to the kidney and the surrounding organs have been recognized. We report on the development of severe acute pancreatitis in a patient after ESWL for a right-sided renal calculus. The patient history and chronologic clinical course strongly suggest a causal association between the ESWL and the development of pancreatitis.
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keywords = calculus
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3/11. Biliary peritonitis secondary to perforation of common bile duct: an unusual presentation of chronic calcific pancreatitis.

    common bile duct perforation causing biliary peritonitis is an unusual entity and a pancreatic calculus causing this perforation is all the more rare, and to our knowledge has not been reported previously. Such an unusual presentation of chronic calcific pancreatitis is herein reported.
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keywords = calculus
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4/11. Solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of possible biliary origin causing acute pancreatitis.

    CONTEXT: Pancreatic ductal calculi are most often associated with chronic pancreatitis. Radiological features of chronic pancreatitis are readily evident in the presence of these calculi. However, acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. CASE REPORT: A 59-year-old man presented with a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed a calculus in the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas causing acute pancreatitis. There were no features suggestive of chronic pancreatitis on CT scanning. The episode acute pancreatitis was managed conservatively. ERCP extraction of the calculus failed as the stone was impacted in the main pancreatic duct resulting in severe acute pancreatitis. Once this resolved, a transduodenal exploration and extraction of the pancreatic ductal calculus was performed successfully. Crystallographic analysis revealed the composition of the calculus was different to that seen in chronic pancreatitis, but more in keeping with a calculus of biliary origin. This could be explained by migration of the biliary calculus via the common channel into the main pancreatic duct. Following the operation the patient made an uneventful recovery and was well at two-year follow up. CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. Failing endoscopic extraction, transduodenal exploration and extraction is a safe option after resolution of acute pancreatitis.
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ranking = 12
keywords = calculus
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5/11. pancreatitis complicated with dilated choledochal remnant after congenital choledochal cyst excision.

    We describe here three cases of pancreatitis after congenital choledochal cyst excision. In these three cases, the choledochal remnant in the pancreas head was markedly dilated, probably because of an incomplete resection of the cyst at the primary operation, and an increase in intraluminal pressure of the pancreatic duct caused by a dynamic obstruction by a protein plug or a pancreatic calculus. Complete cyst excision, including the choledochal wall in the pancreas, is therefore strongly recommended.
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keywords = calculus
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6/11. The scintigraphic "duodenal cut off sign" in acute pancreatitis.

    Acute pancreatitis is a dreaded complication of biliary calculus disease, and several radiographic signs have been reported in association with this condition. We report a new sign demonstrated on hepatobiliary scintigraphy, the duodenal cut off sign, seen in a patient being evaluated for stone disease and later found to have acute pancreatitis. Hepatobiliary scans are commonly performed during the initial evaluation of patients with suspected calculus disease, and visualization of this sign may indicate to the clinician that he is dealing with a more serious condition.
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ranking = 2
keywords = calculus
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7/11. Intraoperative removal of pancreatic duct calculus with a rigid ureterorenoscope and ultrasonic lithotripsy.

    A 51-year-old man with chronic relapsing pancreatitis and recurrent episodes of acute attacks had an impacted ductal stone deep in the head of the pancreas. A staghorn calculus, 1 cm in diameter, was successfully disintegrated and removed intraoperatively with use of a visual endourologic technique and ultrasonic lithotripsy. Because of a dilated pancreatic duct and pseudocyst formation near the tail of the pancreas, distal pancreatic resection and longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy were performed. Postoperatively, no pancreas irritation has been verified, and the patient has remained without symptoms.
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ranking = 5
keywords = calculus
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8/11. Recurrent pancreatitis caused by a calcified ascaris in the duct of Wirsung.

    A case report of recurrent pancreatitis in a 20-yr-old woman due to an impacted calcified ascaris remnant within the duct of Wirsung is presented. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography identified a filling defect in the proximal main pancreatic duct. Transampullary endoscopic retrieval failed to extract the calculus and operative intervention was required to remove the calcified worm remnant.
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keywords = calculus
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9/11. Percutaneous pancreatography: case report and presentation of technique.

    A case of traumatic pancreatitis with a radiopaque calculus producing pain by obstructing the distal pancreatic duct is presented. Preoperative ductal anatomy was defined by a percutaneous pancreatogram that established the presence of mechanical duct obstruction as the cause of pain, and the potential for operative relief of duct obstruction. A remission from pain resulted from pancreatic duct decompression by a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy. The potential value of percutaneous pancreatography is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = calculus
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10/11. Chronic obstructive pancreatitis associated with gallstone in a child.

    A case of chronic obstructive pancreatitis in a 15-year-old girl is presented. The aetiology of the disease is believed to be due primarily to an impacted gallstone in the ampulla of vater and secondarily to a large intraductal calculus in the pancreas. A pancreaticogastrostomy was performed and the large pancreatic calculus removed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = calculus
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