Cases reported "Pancreatitis"

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1/578. Haemosuccus pancreaticus: a clinical challenge.

    BACKGROUND: Haemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare complication of pancreatitis. It is a diagnostic problem for even the most astute clinician and a challenge for the expert endoscopist. We report a 25-year-old male patient who had all the features usually seen in haemosuccus pancreaticus patients: recurrent obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding, pancreatitis, pseudocyst formation, ductal disruption, fistula and pancreatic ascites. The patient was treated by subtotal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and drainage of the pseudocyst. Although pancreatic duct communication with the surrounding vasculature could not be ascertained, we strongly believe the patient had haemosuccus pancreaticus because, over a follow-up period of 3 years, the patient was not only ascites free, but did not experience any further upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We believe that in evaluating patients with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, one should always remember that the pancreas is a part of the gastrointestinal tract and, like other organs, is prone to blood loss.
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2/578. hyperparathyroidism and chronic pancreatitis.

    hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of pancreatitis. The nature of the relationship between the two entities is not well defined, i.e. is it casual or causal? We describe 2 patients with chronic pancreatitis and hyperparathyroidism who presented with epigastric pain and were initially treated unsuccessfully by surgical drainage of the pancreatic ducts. In 1 case the hyperparathyroidism was only recognised after the pancreatic surgery. In both the symptoms of chronic pancreatitis responded well to parathyroidectomy. We believe that our cases add support to a causal relationship between pancreatitis and hyperparathyroidism. Whatever the true relationship, management of these patients should initially be directed at the hyperparathyroidism, followed by appropriate treatment of the pancreatitis.
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3/578. Surgical approaches for pancreatic ascites: report of three cases.

    Pancreatic ascites can occur in association with the rupture of a pseudocyst or the disruption of a pancreatic duct during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis. We report herein the successful treatment of three patients with pancreatic ascites by performing a surgical procedure after 4-6 weeks of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) proved ineffective. The principles of our surgical procedure for pancreatic ascites are as follows: (1) minimum pancreatic tissue is resected; (2) surgical intervention to repair leaking sites is not necessary; (3) pancreatic duct drainage is facilitated by an intestinal Roux-en-Y loop; (4) An external drainage tube is inserted through the Roux-en-Y loop into the main pancreatic duct. All three patients who underwent our surgical procedure had a good outcome. Although the mean follow-up time is still only 18.3 months, their condition has improved, with no evidence of recurrent ascites. Thus, our surgical procedure should be considered as an appropriate treatment for pancreatic ascites because it can be applied for all types of leakage, including leakage from the posterior wall of pancreas; it preserves pancreatic function, especially endocrine function; and it enables preservation of the spleen.
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4/578. Nonoperative management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Problems in differential diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: The evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesions entails a misdiagnosis risk. awareness of the problem, knowledge of the natural history of these lesions, and meticulous posttreatment follow-up can reduce the consequences of diagnostic errors. If all these precautions are adopted, pancreatic pseudocysts can be safely treated nonoperatively. BACKGROUND: The accurate diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions remains a problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence of and the reasons the diagnostic errors occurred in a series of pseudocysts drained percutaneously and to compare these data to those reported in the literature. methods: Data from 70 patients bearing one or more pseudocysts who underwent a percutaneous drainage were reviewed. The pretreatment workup included medical history, physical examination, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) scans, amylase assay in both the serum and the cystic fluid, culture and cytology of the cystic fluid. After removal of the drainage, the minimum follow-up period was 12 mo. RESULTS: Four patients died, and two cancer-associated pseudocysts were identified before removal of the drainage. Sixty-four patients were followed up for a mean of 51.9 mo (range 12-154 mo). A third cancer and a mucinous cystic tumor, fully communicating with the main duct, were further detected during this period.
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5/578. Three generations of hereditary chronic pancreatitis.

    The patient was a 22 year-old male. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis was suspected as a diagnosis since his mother's uncle had been operated on for chronic pancreatitis 14 years previously at the age of 64 years and his mother had been operated on for chronic pancreatitis with calculi 5 years previously at the age of 40 years. Surgery was needed, since: 1) he had experienced abdominal pain for 8 years; 2) endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed a marked irregular dilatation in the main pancreatic duct and a marked irregular dilatation and protein plugs in the ductule of the tail of the pancreas; and, 3) pancreatic functional diagnostic (PFD) test examination showed a 75% decrease in exocrine function. If a surgical procedure had not been performed, the patient would likely have experienced calculi formation in the pancreas and a further decrease in exocrine function. Since the patient was very young and had many protein plugs in the dilated ductule of the tail of the pancreas, we decided to perform a spleen-preserving Puestow's procedure with removal of the tail of the pancreas. Clinical and pathological findings of hereditary pancreatitis are reviewed.
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6/578. Autoimmune pancreatitis, pancreatic mass, and lower gastrointestinal bleed.

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIMP) is a recently described clinical entity causing chronic pancreatitis. It often presents with diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and/or a focal mass at the head of the pancreas causing common bile duct obstruction and jaundice. In most instances, AIMP is mistaken for pancreatic cancer. A number of laboratory abnormalities such as positive antinuclear antibody, hypergammaglobulinemia, and antibody to carbonic anhydrase are often present in these patients. Currently, pancreatic biopsy demonstrating characteristic histopathologic changes is essential to establish the diagnosis. We report the first case of AIMP presenting as a pancreatic tail mass and lower gastrointestinal bleed.
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7/578. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    In the past 3 years, treatment for hiv infection has significantly improved the prognosis for hiv-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of hiv infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National cholesterol education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the hiv therapy. A total of 45 hiv-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.
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8/578. Long term treatment of biliary stricture due to chronic pancreatitis with a metallic stent.

    The exact role of endoprostheses in the management of chronic pancreatitis-associated biliary strictures has not yet been clearly established. We report an unusual case of a patient with this condition who was treated for an unexpectedly long term with a self-expanding metallic endoprosthesis. There has only been one previous report of the use of metallic stents in this situation. It appears that metallic endoprostheses may have a role to play in the management of selected patients who have chronic pancreatitis-associated bile duct stricture.
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9/578. Complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas.

    Pancreatic anomalies are occasionally reported, but complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare. We report a 47-year-old woman with complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. This patient initially presented with jaundice. Computed tomography did not reveal the pancreatic corpus or tail. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography did not visualize the dorsal pancreatic duct. Choledochojejunostomy was performed because she had obstructive jaundice. At laparotomy, there was an enlarged pancreatic head, but no distal pancreas was seen. Histological examination of the pancreatic biopsy specimen showed scattered islets of langerhans in diffuse fibrosis, with destruction of the glandular parenchyma. This case was diagnosed as complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas.
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10/578. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatographic diagnosis and extraction of massive biliary ascariasis presented with acute pancreatitis: a case report.

    This paper reports the case of a young female Thai patient who presented with periodic severe abdominal pains which proved to be acute pancreatitis. Conventional investigations and treatments failed to prove and improve her condition. ERCP was done on the twelfth day after admission. 3 caudal ends of living round worms were noted protruding from the papillary orifice during endoscopy. cholangiography revealed impacted multiple round worms in the common bile duct and both intrahepatic ducts. Endoscopic extraction of the worms was done by using dormia basket and removed with endoscope. Repeated procedure was done 21 times in two and a half hours, obtaining 26 live, mature ascaris lumbricoides varying from 13 to 24 cm in length. Repeated cholangiogram confirmed complete removal of the worms. The patient was relieved from abdominal pain immediately after the procedure, and given oral albendazole 400 mg daily for 7 days. She was discharged asymptomatic 8 days after Ascaris removal.
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