Cases reported "Pancreatitis"

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1/97. Haemosuccus pancreaticus: a clinical challenge.

    BACKGROUND: Haemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare complication of pancreatitis. It is a diagnostic problem for even the most astute clinician and a challenge for the expert endoscopist. We report a 25-year-old male patient who had all the features usually seen in haemosuccus pancreaticus patients: recurrent obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding, pancreatitis, pseudocyst formation, ductal disruption, fistula and pancreatic ascites. The patient was treated by subtotal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and drainage of the pseudocyst. Although pancreatic duct communication with the surrounding vasculature could not be ascertained, we strongly believe the patient had haemosuccus pancreaticus because, over a follow-up period of 3 years, the patient was not only ascites free, but did not experience any further upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We believe that in evaluating patients with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, one should always remember that the pancreas is a part of the gastrointestinal tract and, like other organs, is prone to blood loss.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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2/97. A case of renal artery stenosis secondary to chronic pancreatitis.

    We report a case of renal artery stenosis most probably secondary to chronic pancreatitis. The patient had a traumatic pancreatic fistula. This was followed by numerous attacks of pancreatitis in the following years. At a relatively young age, he developed hypertension. Examinations revealed a right renal artery stenosis which was successfully treated by a percutaneous angioplasty. This rare complication should be kept in mind as a possible complication of pancreatitis.
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ranking = 196.52038594386
keywords = pancreatic fistula, fistula
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3/97. Acute pancreatitis caused by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for bilateral renal pelvic calculi.

    An elderly woman with a history of cholecystectomy and a re-operation for postoperative peritonitis underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for right and left renal pelvic calculi, 11 x 6 and 12 x 5 mm in size, to which 2400 and 1400 shots at 20 kV were given, respectively, on the same day. During the evening after the operation, the patient started to complain of upper abdominal pain. Laboratory examination on the next day revealed elevations in blood and urine amylase levels and a diagnosis of pancreatitis was made. Conservative treatment, including administration of protease inhibitor, did not improve her symptoms; abdominal distension became marked and she underwent laparotomy. Necrosection and indwelling of several drain tubes in abdomen were performed with an operative diagnosis of acute necrotic pancreatitis. With daily irrigation of drain tubes and treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphyloococcus aureus infection of the lungs and abdominal cavity, septicemia and duodenal fistula, the patient gradually recovered and was discharged on postoperative day 151. It was suggested that ESWL was responsible for the acute pancreatitis. Either an obstruction of the pancreatic duct by fragments of common duct stone, or mechanical injury of the pancreas due to adhesion between the pancreas and surrounding tissue caused by the lapalotomy, was considered as a possible cause of pancreatitis. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of severe acute pancreatitis and the present case suggests that ESWL may cause severe pancreatic even in cases without stone shadow in the bile, common duct or pancreatic duct.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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4/97. Bouveret's syndrome complicated by acute pancreatitis.

    BACKGROUND/AIM: This study evaluated a case of Bouveret's syndrome due to a cholecystoduodenal fistula and gallstone obstruction of the duodenum, complicated by acute pancreatitis and cholecystitis. methods: The presenting features, special investigations, radiological findings, operative and endoscopic procedures were reviewed. RESULTS: Symptoms persisted after laparotomy and removal of a gallstone in the duodenum. Intra-operative endoscopy identified a second previously undetected stone impacted in the distal duodenum. CONCLUSION: The importance of excluding more than one stone causing Bouveret's syndrome is emphasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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5/97. hepatic artery aneurysm in a patient with Behcets disease and segmental pancreatitis developing after its embolization.

    Segmental pancreatitis is an unusual form of acute pancreatitis mostly seen in the head of pancreas. We present the CT findings of a segmental pancreatitis in the body and tail of the pancreas developed following endovascular embolization of a giant hepatic artery aneurysm and arterioportal fistula in a patient with Behcet's disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fistula
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6/97. Severe complications of mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst: report of esophagobronchial fistula and hemothorax.

    We report two patients with alcoholic pancreatic pseudocyst which communicated to the mediastinal space through the aortic hiatus, in one patient resulting in hypotensive shock due to hemothorax, and in the other, resulting in esophagobronchial fistula via the mediastinal cyst. The first patient was successfully treated by radical resection of the pancreatic body and tail, and the spleen, with an ultrasonic scalpel, although inflammatory changes caused by pancreatitis were so prominent that the splenic vein was occluded. The second patient could not be treated surgically, because the superior mesenteric vein had been occluded by chronic pancreatitis; he died of respiratory failure and sepsis due to aspiration pneumonia, despite receiving medical treatment.
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ranking = 5
keywords = fistula
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7/97. Marked effect of octreotide acetate in a case of pancreatic pleural effusion.

    A pancreaticopleural effusion is a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. fasting, a protease inhibitor, and/or a surgical intervention are generally selected for the treatment of the pancreatic effusion. We reported here the case, in which octreotide acetate was effective for resolving pancreatic effusion. A 67-year-old man was admitted with a massive pleural effusion. This effusion contained a high level of amylase. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography followed by computed tomography revealed a pancreaticopleural fistula. The pleural effusion was not improved by the treatment of the protease inhibitor with total parenteral nutrition and fasting. A pancreatic stent could not be emplaced because the major pancreatic duct was coiled. Administration of octreotide acetate, a long-acting somatostatin analogue, markedly diminished the effusion and closed the pancreaticopleural fistula. Transient eosinophilia of peripheral blood was seen on admission, but the number of eosinophils decreased after the octreotide therapy and normalised when pleural effusion disappeared. octreotide is one of the effective options for the treatment of pancreatic pleural effusion.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fistula
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8/97. Pancreatocolonic fistula due to severe acute pancreatitis: imaging findings.

    Colonic involvement is an uncommon but potentially lethal complication of severe acute pancreatitis. The spectrum of colonic complications includes localized ileus with "pseudo-obstruction", obstruction, necrosis, hemorrhage, fistula, and ischemic colitis. We report on a patient who developed pancreatocolonic fistulization in the course of protracted severe acute pancreatitis. Emphasis is made on the computed tomographic and water soluble contrast enema findings.
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ranking = 5
keywords = fistula
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9/97. Migration of steel-wire coils into the stomach after transcatheter arterial embolization for a bleeding splenic artery pseudoaneurysm: report of a case.

    Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) represents the primary, and often definitive, mode of therapy for bleeding splanchnic artery pseudoaneurysms (PSA). Nevertheless, a number of complications associated with this procedure have been described. We report herein the case of a 59-year-old man with chronic pancreatitis who was referred to us with hematemesis and hemorrhagic shock. Computed tomography revealed a splenic artery PSA bleeding into a pancreatic pseudocyst, and TAE was performed using steel-wire coils, placed inside the aneurysmal cavity, which resulted in the immediate cessation of bleeding. However, several weeks later some of the coils were found to have dislodged through a gastropseudocystic fistula. Furthermore, an early gastric cancer was incidentally found proximal to the fistula. We finally performed open surgery to treat both disorders; primarily for the gastric cancer, but also for the pseudocyst and fistula, with the intermittent discharge of the steel-wire coils. To our knowledge, migration into the stomach of steel-wire coils after TAE has not been described before. It is generally believed that the embolization procedure should occlude normal portions of the artery both distal and proximal to the PSA with embolization materials. By occluding the PSA in this way, the subsequent migration of steel-wire coils into the pseudocyst and stomach might have been prevented in our patient.
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ranking = 3
keywords = fistula
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10/97. pancreatitis and haemobilia due to arterioportal fistula after percutaneous liver biopsy resolved by selective arterial embolization.

    Haemobilia and arterioportal fistula are uncommon complications secondary to percutaneous liver biopsy. We report the case of a patient who developed haemobilia and subsequently acute pancreatitis as a result of a liver biopsy. Selective hepatic angiogram showed an arterioportal fistula. Transcatheter arterial embolization successfully occluded the fistula. The patient remained asymptomatic 4 months later. We review the published literature concerning acute pancreatitis associated with haemobilia and draw conclusions for management of similar cases in the future.
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ranking = 7
keywords = fistula
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