Cases reported "Pancytopenia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Visceral leishmaniasis: a rare cause of post-transplant fever and pancytopenia.

    Despite the endemic distribution of visceral leishmaniasis in certain parts of our country, there are only a few reports of this infection in renal transplant recipients. We report one renal transplant recipient from non-endemic area with visceral leishmaniasis and graft dysfunction that responded to treatment with stibogluconate. The infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a febrile transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Visceral leishmaniasis masquerading as myelodysplasia.

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man with head and neck cancer who presented with pancytopenia two months after the completion of his chemotherapy and was diagnosed with myelodysplasia on the basis of two bone marrow examinations, before the correct diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis was established with splenectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = leishmaniasis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Visceral leishmaniasis: a trip to the Greek islands is not always idyllic.

    Although cutaneous leishmaniasis is occasionally seen in australia in overseas travellers and migrants, visceral leishmaniasis has been reported rarely and only in people who were immunocompromised. We describe an 18-year-old immunocompetent man who presented with pancytopenia and a 2-week history of fever and lethargy a year after visiting the Greek islands. Visceral leishmaniasis was diagnosed after a bone marrow biopsy showed protozoa, and the patient responded well to treatment with liposomal amphotericin. To our knowledge, this is the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in an immunocompetent patient in australia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = leishmaniasis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. Visceral leishmaniasis mimicking a flare of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    fever in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be caused by exacerbation of the disease itself or by infection. We report on a patient with a long standing history of SLE that was complicated by fever and pancytopenia with no splenomegaly. SLE disease activity was suspected because of an elevated dna-antibody titer. The early positive response to corticoid therapy may have masked the underlying infection. Visceral leishmaniasis was diagnosed by a repeated bone marrow biopsy and serological testing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = leishmaniasis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Immunological studies of pancytopenia in visceral leishmaniasis.

    We report three cases of combined anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in patients with visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar). Using immunofluorescence techniques and the common antiglobulin (Coombs') test, we showed membrane-associated antiplatelet, antineutrophil and antierythrocytic IgG antibodies in all three cases. Treatment with sodium stibogluconate raised the patients' platelet, neutrophil and erythrocyte count. At that time no antibodies were detected on peripheral blood cells. Immunological studies performed on these patients did not show marked abnormalities except for reduced T-helper cells and elevated OKM1-positive cells, which normalized after recovery. As bone marrow suppression was not found, it is suggested that pancytopenia resulted from rapid destruction of antibody-coated blood cells. Whether these antibodies are specific is not clear.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = leishmaniasis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Pancytopenia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.