Cases reported "Papilloma, Inverted"

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1/41. Huge hamartoma with inverted papilloma in the nasal cavity.

    We report clinical experience in managing a 46-year-old Japanese man with long-standing nasal obstruction resulting from a huge left nasal mass. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy were used to make a provisional diagnosis of inverted papilloma. The mass was resected via a frontal approach combined with rhinotomy. Histopathologic examination of the resected specimen was consistent with a hamartoma that included an inverted papilloma on a portion of its surface. In addition to being rare tumors in the nasal cavity, we believe that our patient's tumor the largest nasal hamartoma ever reported.
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2/41. Endoscopic treatment of inverted papilloma.

    Endoscopic resection of inverted papilloma involving the nasal septum and lateral wall of the nose is indicated in selected cases. Careful endoscopic monitoring of the patient every 2-3 months is mandatory. Traditional surgery is reserved for more extensive lesions, recurrent lesions, or patients who have developed squamous cell carcinoma arising from an inverted papilloma. An important part of the procedure is careful informed consent. The patient should be made aware of the possibility of recurrent lesion and the need for more extensive surgery in the future as the result of any recurrence.
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3/41. Endoscopically assisted anterior cranial skull base resection of sinonasal tumors.

    The traditional approach to sinonasal tumors involving the base of skull has been the anterior craniofacial resection. Endoscopic techniques have created the potential to approach the intranasal aspect of skull base lesions without external incisions and still develop an en bloc resection when removed. We report our initial experience with skull base neoplasms in which the otolaryngic portion of the standard resection was accomplished instead through an endoscopic approach. The nature of lesions favorable for this approach and associated technical issues are discussed. Although we do not consider this approach a replacement for the traditional anterior craniofacial resection, it is an important adjunct in the skull base surgeon's armamentarium.
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4/41. Intracranial extension of inverted papilloma: An unusual and potentially fatal complication.

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this article is to define the outcome of intracranial extension of inverted papilloma and outline a rationale for management of this rare clinical presentation. methods: A review of patients with intracranial extension of inverted papilloma reported in the literature (18 patients), or treated in our institution (3 patients ) was performed. The data of these 21 patients were consolidated with regard to clinical presentation, treatment, and outcome. Nine patients, including 1 of our cases, had coexisting squamous cell carcinoma and therefore were excluded from the analysis. Twelve patients with "pure" inverted papilloma formed the basis of this study. RESULTS: The majority of patients (83%) with intracranial inverted papilloma had recurrent disease. patients with extradural disease had a survival rate of 86% with an average follow-up of 4.4 years. Eighty-six percent of these survivors were treated with craniofacial resection. In contrast, 75% of patients with intradural inverted papilloma were dead of disease with an average follow-up of 9.3 months regardless of the treatment modality. CONCLUSIONS: Intracranial extension of inverted papilloma is mostly associated with recurrent disease. Intracranial extradural inverted papilloma can be effectively controlled with craniofacial resection. Intracranial intradural involvement of inverted papilloma has a poor prognosis regardless of treatment. Aggressive treatment of intranasal inverted papilloma may be the most important factor in preventing intracranial presentation.
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5/41. Isolated inverted papilloma of the sphenoid sinus.

    Inverted papilloma is a rare benign sinonasal tumour, characterized by a potentially invasive nature. The lateral nasal wall represents the most common site of origin, whereas paranasal sinuses are quite frequently found to be involved by extension. In contrast, primary sinus inverted papillomas have rarely been reported. The present study describes an extremely rare case of inverted papilloma, isolated to the left sphenoid sinus, that was treated by a transnasal endoscopic procedure. The therapeutic approach chosen is discussed and the results of a two-year follow-up are also presented.
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6/41. Inverting papilloma of the temporal bone.

    OBJECTIVES: Inverting papilloma of the temporal bone is exceedingly rare. The objective is to familiarize the clinician with the clinical presentation and prognosis of this entity. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case study and literature review. methods: Published reports of inverting papillomas originating in the temporal bone were reviewed in conjunction with two cases presenting at the University of texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). RESULTS: Inverting papillomas of the temporal bone are frequently associated with persistent middle ear effusion and ipsilateral sinonasal tumors and display a higher incidence of malignancy. CONCLUSIONS: Successful management of these tumors requires an aggressive surgical resection. Adjuvant radiation therapy is recommended in patients with malignant changes.
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7/41. Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the maxillary sinus.

    A case of respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the maxillary sinus is reported. Glandular hamartomas involving the sinonasal tract have received only limited documentation in the literature. The differential diagnosis of adenomatoid hamartoma includes schneiderian papilloma of the inverted type and adenocarcinoma. Limited but complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice.
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8/41. Inverted papilloma invading the orbit.

    Inverted papilloma is an unusual entity for many ophthalmologists. We report a case of inverted papilloma of the nasal cavity and sinuses, invading the orbit in a 33-year-old man. The patient presented with a right medial canthal mass, proptosis, diminution of vision, epiphora and nasal obstruction. In the past, he underwent multiple procedures for surgical removal of the tumor with frequent recurrences. A computed tomographic scan revealed a mass filling both the nasal cavities and sinuses, destroying adjacent bones and invading the medial aspect of the orbit, leading to proptosis. Excision of the tumor was performed by a lateral rhinotomy approach. The tumor proved to be an inverted papilloma with focal transformation to transitional cell carcinoma. Post-operative CT scan revealed residual tumor, which responded to radiotherapy, with no recurrence over six months. Histopathologically, these tumors are benign, but locally invasive. The tumors that invade the orbit are usually locally aggressive, highly malignant and recur frequently. Radical excision of the tumor is technically difficult and often incomplete, so radiotherapy should be considered as an adjunct to surgery.
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9/41. Inverted papilloma of the nasal cavity presenting with massive amounts of squamous metaplastic cells in sputum. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Squamous metaplasic cells are rarely seen in sputum of female nonsmokers. CASE: A 47-year-old female nonsmoker presented with massive amounts of squamous metaplasic cells in sputum and an elevated level of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen in serum present for months, while no causative lesion was detected either by lung computed tomography or bronchoscopy. The patient was eventually diagnosed as having inverted papilloma in the right nasal cavity. Resection of the tumor brought about disappearance of squamous metaplastic cells in sputum and return of serum SCC antigen to the normal range. CONCLUSION: This case clearly demonstrates that squamous metaplastic cells in sputum can originate in lesions in the nasal cavity, although they are rare. It should be kept in mind that the nasal cavity is a potential site producing squamous metaplastic cells in sputum.
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10/41. Primary inverted papilloma of the middle ear and mastoid.

    OBJECTIVE: Inverted papilloma (Schneiderian-type papilloma), involving the middle ear and mastoid as a primary lesion or as an extension of a sinonasal papilloma, is an extremely rare occurrence. STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a case report format with a review of the literature. Epidemiologic, diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up problems are discussed. SETTING: Academic, tertiary referral hospital. PATIENT AND methods: The patient underwent Wullstein type I tympanoplasty and complete mastoidectomy, revealing obliteration of the pneumatic cells by polypoid tissue. The middle ear was completely filled by polypoid tissue. Histopathologic examination revealed an inverted papilloma of the middle ear and mastoid. CONCLUSION: literature reports indicate that inverted papillomas of the middle ear and mastoid differ pathogenically and epidemiologically from sinonasal inverted papillomas. recurrence rates and association with squamous cell carcinoma are higher in Schneiderian-type papillomas of the middle ear than in inverted papillomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Long-term follow-up after removal of inverted papilloma of the middle ear and mastoid is mandatory. magnetic resonance imaging is the first follow-up examination to perform.
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