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11/78. Malignant Glomus vagale: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Tumors of the chemoreceptor system are quite rare, and are usually considered to be benign, but locally invasive. We report a case of a glomus juxtavagale tumor with metastasis to cervical lymph nodes, lung, and bone. review of the literature shows that 19% of similar cases reported also showed distant metastases, a rate significantly higher than for other chemodectomas. Clinically and histologically, benign and malignant tumors are identical, so only the demonstration of distant metastasis indicates malignant neoplasm. Primary treatment is surgical, but radiotherapy is useful for palliation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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12/78. Glomus jugulare tumors of the middle ear and mastoid: diagnosis and surgical treatment.

    At the 1976 Southern Sectional Meeting of American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc., a color movie presenting two cases on the "diagnosis and treatment of glomus jugulare tumors of the middle ear and mastoid" was shown. The purpose of this paper and film is to describe the author's experience of 16 cases of glomus tumors involving the middle ear and mastoid (seven tympanicum and nine jugulare). A review of the literature and findings pertaining specifically to the two cases shown in the film is presented.
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ranking = 3.9701828591547
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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13/78. Two cases of glomus tumour treated by unusual embolization.

    Two cases of glomus tumour treated by the catheterization technique are reported. In the first case, after it was found impossible to catheterize the external carotid artery by the femoral route, the external carotid was punctured directly, became spasmodic and the catheter could not be introduced, so the inner wall of the external carotid was eroded by manipulating the tip of the metallic guide. This resulted in complete occlusion of the artery 1 cm above the bifurcation of the common carotid. The second case was first treated by embolization of the ascending pharyngeal artery, but with only transitory improvement, so, after 2 months, additional embolization was performed via the vertebral artery, which was followed by immediate and lasting improvement.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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14/78. radionuclide angiography in evaluation of chemodectomas of the jugular glomus.

    Clinical, radiographic, and radionuclide angiographic findings of three cases of jugular glomic tumor associated with hearing loss are discussed. In one case computed tomographic findings are discussed. It is concluded that radioisotopic techniques may be useful in diagnosis and follow-up of this tumor.
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ranking = 4
keywords = glomus
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15/78. Extensive calcification in a tumor of the glomus jugulare.

    Extensive calcification in the intracranial portion of a glomus jugulare tumor is reported. This finding has not been reported previously in the literature. The patient probably was afflicted with this process for many years and presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The combination of this tumor with subarachnoid hemorrhage is rare.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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16/78. Bilateral chemodectoma in the neck.

    A 55-year-old man with bilateral cervical chemodectoma is reported. The differences between tumours of the carotid body and those of the glomus intravagale are described and a brief review of the investigation and management of such tumours is given.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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17/78. Demonstration of hormonal activity of a glomus juglare tumour by catecholamine determination.

    For the first time the hormonal activity of a glomus jugulare tumour, clinically manifest by intermitting hypertension, could be demonstrated by catecholamine level determination in blood. Endocrinological and diagnostic aspects concerned to the differential diagnosis of the hypertension in these patients are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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18/78. death following external carotid artery embolization for a functioning glomus jugulare chemodectoma. Case report.

    A 24-year-old man with left sixth through twelfth cranial nerve palsies and severe, fluctuating, systemic arterial hypertension was found to have a large, vascular, catecholamine-forming glomus jugulare chemodectoma. After his electrolyte imbalance was corrected, left external carotid embolization (using Gelfoam) was carried out. The systemic blood pressure stabilized at around 160/100 mm Hg over the next 12 hours. Ten hours later the hitherto conscious patient developed acute arterial hypotension, lapsed into coma, and died. autopsy showed tumor infarction, swelling, cerebellar tonsillar herniation, and medullary compression. An unusual complication of glomus tumor embolization is highlighted. The roles of preliminary decompressive surgery and urgent resuscitation by vasopressors are discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = glomus
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19/78. Case report. Hypoglossal palsy: computed tomography demonstration of denervation hemiatrophy of the tongue associated with glomus jugulare tumor.

    In a patient with left glomus jugulare tumor and left hypoglossal nerve palsy, computed tomography demonstrated focal lucency of the left half of the tongue. This was interpreted to represent postdenervation fibrosis and fatty replacement of the intrinsic and extrinsic lingual muscles supplied by the hypoglossal (XIIth cranial) nerve.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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20/78. Scintigraphic evaluation of glomus tumours.

    The current investigations of choice for a suspected glomus tumour are either direct or indirect angiography to include digital subtraction followed by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or, if available, CT and MRI with gadolinium alone. Although these modalities confirm the diagnosis and give anatomical information to facilitate accurate staging, they do not provide functional data. The use of radionuclide scintigraphy can add an extra physiological dimension to glomus tumour imaging. iodine-131/123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a tumour imaging agent which has been used to diagnose head and neck neuroendocrine tumours to include paragangliomata and medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT). However, it is expensive and the new head and neck tumour imaging agent technetium-99 m (Tc99m) (v) dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) has superceded it as the imaging agent of choice to evaluate MCT. We report a patient with a glomus jugulare tumour which was evaluated with I131/I123-MIBG and Tc99m (v) DMSA. The tumour was functional and is the first reported case exhibiting positive accumulation of both I131-MIBG and Tc99m (v) DMSA. The patient was subsequently treated with a therapeutic dose of I131-MIBG. The significance of these results is discussed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = glomus
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