Cases reported "Paralysis"

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1/25. herpes zoster: a cause of acute detrusor muscle paralysis.

    The essence of this report is to apprise the dermatologist of this fascinating but unusual complication of herpes zoster and to underscore the help he may give in establishing the diagnosis along with assisting in the management of this disorder.
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ranking = 1
keywords = herpes zoster, zoster, herpes
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2/25. Neuroinvasion during delayed primary HHV-7 infection in an immunocompetent adult with encephalitis and flaccid paralysis.

    Antibody avidity tests have been used to detect primary human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) infection in an immunocompetent 19-year-old man with encephalitis and flaccid paralysis for which all other suspected causes had been excluded. The finding of the viral dna in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum samples suggests that primary HHV-7 infection with invasion of the central nervous system and consequential disease had occurred. As almost all adults are infected with HHV-7 in early childhood, the present case of delayed primary infection with serious symptoms must be exceptionally rare and no cases of such late acquisition of the virus have been documented in the literature. This report of HHV-7 dna in the CSF of an immunocompetent adult is also unique.
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ranking = 0.84022503185521
keywords = encephalitis, herpes
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3/25. Electrodiagnostic features of acute paralytic poliomyelitis associated with West Nile virus infection.

    west nile virus (WNV) infection is a potentially fatal disease, with meningoencephalitis being its most common neurological manifestation. guillain-barre syndrome (GBS) has also been described, but acute paralytic poliomyelitis has only recently been recognized. We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of five patients with WNV infection, who presented with acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Three patients manifested focal asymmetrical weakness, and two had rapid ascending quadriplegia mimicking GBS. Electrodiagnostic studies during the acute illness showed normal sensory nerve action potentials, compound motor action potentials of normal or reduced amplitude, and no slowing of nerve conduction velocities. Depending on the timing of the examination, fibrillation potentials were widespread, including in those with focal weakness. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging in one patient showed abnormal T2-weighted signals in the spinal cord gray matter. On follow-up, signs of clinical improvement were seen in one patient, whereas two remained quadriplegic and ventilator-dependent 5 months after the onset. This report highlights the value of the electrodiagnostic studies in the diagnosis and prognosis of focal or generalized weakness due to acute paralytic poliomyelitis associated with WNV infection.
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ranking = 0.16591332254288
keywords = encephalitis
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4/25. west nile virus--the eye of the storm: a case study.

    west nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that emerged in the united states in 1999 and is migrating westward across the country. It occurs in the late summer or fall when there is an abundance of mosquitoes. Symptoms develop 3-14 days after an infected mosquito bites a person. Most WNV infections are asymptomatic or produce mild symptoms; however, 1 in 150 cases is severe with significant neurological deficits. The virus can attack the anterior horn cells, causing acute flaccid paralysis resulting in a poliomyelitis-like syndrome. diagnosis is based on history, clinical presentation, and laboratory tests. In the late summer or fall, WNV infections should be suspected in persons with unexplained encephalitis, meningitis, or flaccid paralysis. There is no definitive medical treatment for WNV. Preventive measures are the most effective means to combat the disease.
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ranking = 0.16591332254288
keywords = encephalitis
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5/25. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: can it recur?

    Bickerstaff's brain-stem encephalitis is usually a monophasic post-viral inflammatory illness characterized by progressive ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and disturbance of consciousness (or hyper-reflexia). Since the clinical spectrum of Bickerstaff encephalitis may overlap with the Miller-Fisher and Guillain-Barre syndromes, the presence of anti- GQ1b antibodies and abnormal brain MRI can help to support its diagnosis. However, absence of anti-GQ1b antibodies and normal MRI do not exclude the diagnosis, which remains based on clinical criteria and exclusion of other etiologies. We report a case of recurrent Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis with no identifiable antecedent illness, and overlapping features of Miller Fisher and Guillain-Barre syndromes, in the presence of negative anti-GQ1b antibodies and repeatedly normal MRI of the brain.
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ranking = 1.1613932578002
keywords = encephalitis
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6/25. west nile virus encephalomyelitis with polio-like paralysis & nigral degeneration.

    BACKGROUND: patients infected with west nile virus (WNV) may develop acute neurologic disease, which can be severe or even fatal, including WNV meningitis, encephalitis, and an irreversible acute flaccid paralysis or poliomyelitis-like syndrome. movement disorders have also been described. REPORT: We report combined neuronal loss, gliosis, and neurofibrillary tangle formation in the substantia nigra of a 41-year-old man with a history of WNV encephalomyelitis and poliomyelitis-like paralysis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically our patient did not display parkinsonism, however, it is interesting to speculate whether, in the absence of the residual subacute poliomyelitis-like syndrome, the neuropathologic findings could have eventually evolved clinically into WNV-associated postencephalitic parkinsonism.
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ranking = 0.16591332254288
keywords = encephalitis
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7/25. Abdominal muscle paralysis associated with herpes zoster.

    We describe a 77-year-old women with cutaneous herpes zoster in the area of the right T9-T11 dermatomes complicated by abdominal muscle paralysis. Four months after onset of paralysis, stimulation of appropriate intercostal nerves failed to evoke responses from the corresponding segments of the rectus abdominis muscle. Three months later EMG of these muscle segments revealed profuse denervation activity and spontaneous long-lasting burst of high frequency discharges. Magnetic stimulation applied transcranially and peripherally at T10 evoked responses from the left, but not from the right paralytic rectus abdominis muscle. electric stimulation of right T10 elicited a markedly delayed, prolonged and polyphasic response in the transverse abdominis muscle and EMG revealed polyphasia and increased motor unit potential duration in muscle segments underlying herpes zoster eruption. One and a half years after onset, the paralysis of the rectus abdominis muscle was still present. A survey of the literature concerning this rare type of zoster paralysis is presented.
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ranking = 2.8999791288611
keywords = herpes zoster, zoster, herpes
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8/25. Isolated anterior interosseous nerve palsy following herpes zoster infection: a case report and review of the literature.

    A 64-year-old lady noticed weakness of her thumb within two weeks of having developed "shingles" causing vesicular lesions on her arm and hand. Clinical and neurophysiological testing confirmed a lesion of the anterior interosseous nerve. Although motor involvement after herpes zoster infection is recognised, this usually has a myotomal distribution; isolated involvement of a branch of a peripheral motor nerve has not previously been described.
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ranking = 2.3043296772705
keywords = herpes zoster, zoster, herpes
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9/25. Acute pseudobulbar palsy due to bilateral focal cortical damage: the opercular syndrome of Foix-Chavany-Marie.

    Two children are described who suddenly developed an encephalitic illness with intractable bilateral facial seizures. The seizures subsided over several days, but the children were left with the signs of pseudobulbar palsy and are unable to speak or swallow effectively. Bilateral destructive lesions in the opercular regions evolved on computed tomographic scans. Both children were treated with acyclovir relatively early in the illness, and cerebrospinal fluid and serum antibodies support the diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.
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ranking = 0.17657174168367
keywords = encephalitis, herpes
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10/25. An unusual case of flaccid paralysis of both lower limbs following herpes zoster.

    A 57-year-old man with left T8-9 cutaneous herpes zoster lesions and subsequent development of flaccid paralysis of both lower limbs is reported. Viral studies strongly supported a diagnosis of herpes zoster. No other cause for the paralysis was found. The time interval between the cutaneous lesions and the motor weakness, the clinical course and good recovery suggest a causal relationship. The dermatomal and myotomal dissociation has been well-documented on the ipsilateral side, but involvement of the contralateral side is rare. This would appear to be unusual in that there was bilateral weakness of "LMN type".
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ranking = 1.8434637418164
keywords = herpes zoster, zoster, herpes
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