Cases reported "Paralysis"

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1/5. Simultaneous vocal fold and tongue paresis secondary to Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    dysphonia is a common presenting symptom in cases referred for otolaryngologic evaluation. Similarly, primary care physicians frequently see adolescents or young adults with symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Some of the patients with active Epstein-Barr virus infection who have severe clinical manifestations of infectious mononucleosis will be referred for otolaryngologic evaluation. Voice abnormalities in these patients, though, are usually limited to altered resonance due to pharyngeal crowding by hyperplastic lymphoid tissue. We describe a patient with infectious mononucleosis who was referred for evaluation of dysphonia and was diagnosed with unilateral tongue and vocal fold paresis. We also discuss the patient's clinical course and review the related literature. Although uncommon, cranial nerve palsies must be considered in the patient with Epstein-Barr virus infection who presents with voice or speech disturbance. Arch Otolaryngol head neck Surg. 2000;126:1491-1494
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keywords = voice
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2/5. Absence of later auditory brain stem response components, congenital horizontal nystagmus, and hypotonia in male infants.

    Five male infants, all of whom showed findings of wave I or waves I and II only of the auditory brain stem response (ABR), congenital horizontal pendular nystagmus, and hypotonia of head and limbs in the early infantile period with later paresis, are discussed. Their ages ranged from 3 to 13 months at the first examination, at which time neither head control, sitting, nor walking had been attained. follow-up studies of ABRs revealed persistent abnormalities with neither remission nor progression. In spite of these abnormalities, these infants responded well to voices and other sounds. The congenital nystagmus in each case was demonstrated by electronystagmography to have a frequency of 2 to 3 Hz. The correlation between clinical signs and ABR is uncertain as yet. However, our findings are strongly indicative of nonprogressive inborn abnormalities in the lower brain stem.
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keywords = voice
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3/5. Neuropathological findings in a case of coexistent progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimer's disease.

    A 66-year-old man was investigated for increasing forgetfulness and frequent falls. Following appropriate investigations, the cause was presumed to be senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. He was reviewed one year later and found to have impaired vertical gaze and a hoarse voice. Progressive dementia, nuchal rigidity, anarthria, and sphincteric incontinence developed subsequently. A diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy was made. He died four years after the initial assessment. Neuropathological examination revealed changes characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy, and suggestive of Alzheimer's disease. Globose tangles, granulovacuolar bodies and gliosis were present in the midbrain, the pons, the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, and the globus pallidus. Senile plaques and occasional neurofibrillary tangles and granulovacuolar bodies were found in the hippocampus, amygdala, and temporal cortex. The coexistence of two disease processes resulting in dementia is discussed.
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keywords = voice
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4/5. The long-term period measurement, an instrumental method in phoniatry.

    With the help of an Analog to Digital Converter we are able to perform serial and statistical analysis in the time domain. The difficulty in those long-term period measurements consists in the correct extraction of the periodicity in human voice. A simple method is the electroglottography, which, however, is not applicable in all cases. The analysis of the acoustic wave (translated via microphone) demands a lot of electronics if to be precise. Our investigation consists of a compromise between precision and amount of instrumentation, and we only took one parameter as a criterion. The possible error is negligible. We present the results of this measurement type using the patterns of one normal voice and eight different kinds of voice disorders.
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keywords = voice
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5/5. Bilateral thalamic infarcts presenting as acute pseudobulbar palsy.

    A 28-year-old, previously healthy, normotensive woman suddenly developed an acute pseudobulbar palsy with dysarthria, dysphagia, hypernasal voice and mild right arm paresis. Extensive laboratory investigations excluded all other possible causes of acute pseudobulbar palsy (neoplastic, inflammatory, demyelinative, myasthenic) and an MRI study demonstrated bilateral isolated thalamic infarcts. Oral contraceptives and smoking were the only possible stroke risk factors found and cerebral diaschisis the most tenuous explanation proposed. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that bilateral thalamic infarction on specific nuclei could be manifested as acute pseudobulbar palsy.
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keywords = voice
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