Cases reported "Paranasal Sinus Diseases"

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11/326. maxillary sinus involution after endoscopic sinus surgery in a child: a case report.

    Studies in animal models have suggested that functional endoscopic sinus surgery may affect facial skeletal growth in children, although reviews of large clinical series do not support this observation. This is a case report of a 12 year old male referred to the senior author (SBL) several months after undergoing bilateral functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The preoperative computed tomograms of the paranasal sinuses were normal with symmetrical well-developed paranasal sinuses. Postoperative computed tomography revealed nearly total involution of the osseous skeleton of the left maxillary sinus. This is the first clinical report of alterations in the facial skeleton of a child secondary to iatrogenic trauma directed at the osteomeatal complex. The case and related literature are reviewed in detail.
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12/326. Isolated sphenoid sinus abscess: clinical and radiological failure in preoperative diagnosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Isolated sphenoid sinusitis and abscess formation is a rare entity, which can lead to misdiagnosed or improperly treated patients and an unfavorable outcome. Invasion of the skull base and cavernous sinus usually causes cranial nerve palsies, suggesting a neoplasm at the initial presentation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A case of isolated abscess in the sphenoid sinus is reported. The complete destruction of the clivus and its unexceptional radiological data, in addition to the absence of clinical and laboratory evidence of infection, led us to misdiagnose a possible clival chordoma during preoperative evaluation. The patient underwent an endonasal-transsphenoidal procedure for diagnosis and surgical removal. Surgical drainage and prolonged antimicrobial treatment resulted in complete clinical recovery. CONCLUSION: Its close proximity to vital structures and slender bony structures may allow the infection to disseminate, with serious neurological complications. On the other hand, the variable clinical presentations and radiological data usually cause delayed or missed diagnosis in these cases. This emphasizes the importance of documentation of this unusual entity and its radiological manifestations.
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keywords = nasal, nose
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13/326. mucormycosis of the nose and paranasal sinuses.

    Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection initiated in the paranasal sinuses that frequently progresses to orbital and brain involvement. If recognized early, involvement is limited to the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Diabetics in poor control are at greatest risk, however, any immunocompromised individual may be infected. The mainstays of therapy are reversal of immunosuppression, systemic amphortericin B, and surgical debridement. survival has improved dramatically, yet deaths still occur if the infection is not recognized and not treated early in its course or if the source of immunocompromise is not reversible. Several case examples illustrate the clinical course of this unusual, but potentially fatal, fungal infection. Taxonomy, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses are reviewed in detail.
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keywords = nasal, nose
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14/326. Pneumosinus dilatans of the maxillary sinus. Case report.

    A case of the rare condition pneumosinus dilatans of the maxillary sinus is presented. This is a rare differential diagnosis of a maxillary disease. The diagnostic imaging features of this condition are described, and a recommendation of views for adequately delineating this disorder is given. Only a few cases of pneumosinus dilatans of the maxillary sinus are described in the English-language literature, and the precise cause and pathogenesis remain obscure. We performed an enlargement of the maxillary ostium in order to increase the ventilation of the paranasal sinus. In the short-term follow-up, this patient has been asymptomatic. The postulated mechanism of air trapping in the sinus cavity seems to be logical in this case, because the symptoms were eliminated by surgically decompressing the sinus to overcome this valve mechanism.
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15/326. Compartmentalized maxillary sinus mucocele.

    A rare case of compartmentalized maxillary sinus mucocele 12 years after a Caldwell-Luc operation is reported. The two separate mucoceles were drained intranasally by endoscopic sinus surgery. The clinical features of this mucocele are presented and the incidence, presentation and theories on formation of post-operative mucoceles are reviewed.
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16/326. The endoscopic management of chronic frontal sinusitis associated with frontal sinus posterior table erosion.

    Expansile inflammatory diseases of the frontal sinuses may produce erosion of the posterior table of the frontal sinus. In these instances, the bone between sinus mucosa and intracranial dura is absent. Over the past decade, endoscopic frontal sinusotomy has emerged as the preferred technique for the treatment of refractory chronic frontal sinusitis. Endoscopic approaches also have a role in the most advanced instances of frontal sinusitis. A retrospective chart review of patients who were treated for frontal sinusitis with erosion of the frontal sinus posterior table was performed. Eight patients were identified. All patients underwent endoscopic frontal sinusotomy; some patients required multiple endoscopic procedures. Complete frontal recess dissection with identification of the frontal ostium was achieved for all involved frontal sinuses. In all cases, this postoperative result was monitored by CT scans (where indicated) and serial nasal endoscopy, which demonstrated good frontal sinus aeration and normal mucociliary clearance. Antibiotics were administered for culture-documented bacterial exacerbations, and systemic steroids were given for management of allergic fungal sinusitis and sinonasal polyposis associated with asthma. No patient underwent frontal sinus obliteration or cranialization. No suppurative intracranial complications were noted during the postoperative period. Endoscopic frontal sinusotomy can be used safely for the definitive management of frontal sinusitis associated with posterior table erosion. In fact, endoscopic techniques may represent the preferred approach for the treatment of this problem. Such an approach avoids the morbidity of more destructive alternatives (such as obliteration), and serves to create a frontal sinus with normal mucociliary clearance.
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17/326. Maxillary antral mucocele and its relevance for maxillary sinus augmentation grafting: a case report.

    Paranasal sinus mucoceles are benign, locally expansile cyst-like masses that are filled with mucus and lined with epithelium. Most occur in the frontal sinus. maxillary sinus mucoceles are presumably uncommon in the united states and European countries, although they have been frequently reported in japan, particularly following Caldwell-Luc surgery. Clinical symptoms may not appear for at least 10 years postoperatively. Chronic sinus inflammation and allergic disease are also common causes of paranasal mucoceles. This paper provides an overview of maxillary sinus mucoceles and presents a case study involving a 62-year-old Latin male whose asymptomatic maxillary sinus mucocele was not revealed until he presented for maxillary sinus grafting and implant placement.
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18/326. Congenital maxillary sinus cholesteatoma.

    cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare condition. The purpose of this paper is to present a child with a congenital maxillary sinus cholesteatoma. An 18-month-old girl presented with a 4-week history of right cheek and intraoral swelling. Examination revealed a smooth swelling of the right hard palate in association with the facial swelling in the maxillary region. An inferior meatal antrostomy revealed pultaceous debris in the right maxillary antrum and biopsy confirmed a maxillary sinus cholesteatoma. The inferior meatal antrostomy was enlarged to allow exteriorisation of the disease. recurrence of the disease has not presented on follow-up. An exteriorisation procedure as performed, in child of this age, allows normal facial growth. If recurrence develops then further treatment may be instituted in a more mature facial skeleton.
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19/326. Semi-invasive allergic aspergillosis of the paranasal sinuses.

    aspergillosis of the nose and paranasal sinuses has classically been divided into four types: allergic, non-invasive, invasive and fulminant. Recent reports have suggested that a semi-invasive form with bone destruction and erosion, but without fungal tissue invasion, may occur. We present a case of allergic non-invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal sinuses with associated bone destruction extending into the orbit and anterior cranial fossa, in a non-immunocompromised patient. Surgical debridement combined with a prolonged course of oral itraconazole has resulted in long-term resolution with no evidence of recurrence of disease five years later.
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ranking = 3.1476322942264
keywords = nasal, nose
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20/326. Gas in the cranium: an unusual case of delayed pneumocephalus following craniotomy.

    We present the case history of a 23-year-old man who underwent frontal craniotomy followed by radiotherapy for a Grade III anaplastic glioma. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the 3-month follow-up showed significant tumour response. He became unwell some weeks after the MRI with an upper respiratory tract infection, severe headache and mild right-sided weakness. A computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a very large volume of intracranial gas, thought to have entered via a defect in the frontal air sinus after craniotomy and brought to light by blowing his nose. Intracranial air is frequently present after craniotomy, but it is normally absorbed within 34 weeks. The presence of pneumocephalus on a delayed postoperative CT scan should raise the possibility of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula, or infection with a gas-forming organism. Many CSF fistulae require surgical closure in order to prevent potentially life-threatening central nervous system infection and tension pneumocephalitis. Immediate neurosurgical review is advisable.
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keywords = nose
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