Cases reported "Paranasal Sinus Diseases"

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21/326. Entomophthoromycosis of the nose and paranasal sinus.

    A case of entomophthoromycosis of the nose and paranasal sinus is presented. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported with this infection. Though the clinical picture mimicked a malignancy, histopathology clinched the diagnosis of entomophthoromycosis. The lesions resolved completely with oral potassium iodide.
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keywords = nasal, nose
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22/326. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis diagnosis by aspiration cytology.

    Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is a rapidly progressing, often fatal fungal infection that occurs commonly in diabetics and immunocompromised individuals. We present 2 cases of rhinocerebral mucormycosis with a paranasal mass. One patient had an intracranial extension. Nasal scrapings and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the paranasal masses showed fungal hyphae morphologically resembling Mucor. Surgical material showed features of mucormycosis. FNAC and scrape smears can give a conclusive diagnosis of mucormycosis, and the patient can be treated with appropriate antifungal therapy and surgical debridement. Preoperative cytology is an effective technique to establish a diagnosis of mucormycosis and obviates the need for a preoperative biopsy.
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ranking = 0.3088172127656
keywords = nasal
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23/326. Pneumoceles of the paranasal sinuses (a case report).

    We report a case of an infection of a large sphenoidal sinus communicating with a hyperaerated mastoid. Endoscopic drainage of this large cavity was successful. We suggest that EES should have a place in the treatment of the sinusal pneumocele. Surgery should however be reserved for cosmetic purposes, infection, algetic symptoms and ocular problems. A cosmetic correction with osteotomy and bone resection can be associated with the endoscopic surgery.
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ranking = 0.6176344255312
keywords = nasal
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24/326. sinusitis as the first indication of sarcoidosis an incidental finding in a patient with presumed 'odontogenic' sinusitis: case report.

    Involvement of the paranasal sinuses and nose by sarcoidosis is uncommon, and has been reported in only 1-4% of patients with sarcoidosis. Clinical symptoms are nasal obstruction, epistaxis, nasal pain, discharge, anosmia or hyposmia, epiphora, and dyspnoea. We present a case of sarcoidosis in which sinusitis was the first clinical sign of the disease.
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ranking = 0.5088172127656
keywords = nasal, nose
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25/326. Endoscopic diagnosis of sarcoidosis in a patient presenting with bilateral exophthalmos and pansinusitis.

    sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Otolaryngologic and ophthalmologic manifestations occur in 15 to 55% of afflicted individuals, respectively. neck masses, parotid enlargement, and facial nerve palsy are the most common presenting otolaryngologic complaints, while lacrimal gland enlargement, uveitis, and upper eyelid masses often call the attention of the ophthalmologist. biopsy reveals non-caseating granulomas, while the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) level may be elevated. We report an unusual case of a patient who presented with severe bilateral exophthalmos as the sole initial complaint. A prior workup included a negative conjunctival biopsy. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), the patient had pansinusitis. Endoscopic ethmoidectomies with tissue analysis revealed sarcoidosis. Further evaluation revealed no evidence of systemic disease, and all symptoms resolved with a course of oral steroids. Thus, nasal endoscopy and biopsy of affected paranasal sinus mucosa may prove a useful adjunct to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, particularly in atypical cases.
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ranking = 0.3088172127656
keywords = nasal
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26/326. Sino-orbital fistula: two case reports.

    A fistula between the paranasal sinuses and the orbit as a late complication of orbital fractures is rare and may present with intermittent symptoms due to air passing into the orbit. A case note review of two patients with sino-orbital fistula is presented. Two patients, 23- and 30-year-old males, presented with intermittent symptoms of globe displacement, diplopia or discomfort months after repair of an orbital floor fracture with a synthetic orbital floor implant. The symptoms occurred after nose blowing. They were both cured by removal of the implant and partial removal of the tissue surrounding the implant. A sino-orbital fistula may complicate the otherwise routine repair of an orbital floor fracture, but may be cured by removal of the implant and part of the surrounding pseudocapsule.
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keywords = nasal, nose
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27/326. Unusual intradiploic hematoma.

    This 58-year-old man presented with a left frontal bone lesion that had been growing over a 2-year period. The lesion increased in size, resulting in proptosis that affected the patient's visual acuity and eyeball movement. On computerized tomography and x-ray studies, a huge lesion located between the widened frontal diploic bone and involving the orbital roof and paranasal sinuses was noted. The entire lesion was radically resected. The authors unexpectedly found that an intradiploic organized hematoma had caused the swelling.
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ranking = 0.1544086063828
keywords = nasal
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28/326. Cutaneous and paranasal aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    A 26-year-old Libyan woman presented with asymptomatic nodulo-ulcerative skin lesions present for 1 year. Three years prior to presentation, she had experienced a nasal discharge followed by the development of a nodule in the nasal cavity and a plaque on the hard palate. These lesions had gradually increased in size and ulcerated, resulting in perforation of the nasal septum and palate. Two years later, the patient noticed the appearance of skin lesions: a nodule on the right thumb and numerous nodulo-ulcerative lesions on the extremities. General physical examination was normal with no significant lymphadenopathy. Examination of the oral cavity revealed perforation of the distal nasal septum, with a perforated nodular plaque involving the entire palate, associated with subluxation of the upper incisors (Fig. 1a). On skin examination, multiple firm nodules and nodulo-ulcerative lesions with a central eschar and raised margins were observed. The lesions ranged in size from 0.5 to 5 cm and were distributed on the right hand and fingers, left upper arm (Fig. 1b), left calf, and right thigh. Routine laboratory investigations (liver function tests, serum calcium, electrolytes, lipid profile, urine and stool culture studies) were normal. immunoelectrophoresis disclosed normal levels of immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, and IgM. Serologic studies for human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) and syphilis, and a tuberculin test, were all negative. A Giemsa-stained tissue smear was negative for leishmania tropica organisms. Radiological studies disclosed a slight haziness of the maxillary sinuses with perforation of the nasal septum. A chest X-ray was normal. Histopathologic examination of biopsies taken from both the palate and from ulcerated and nonulcerated skin lesions was performed, and all showed similar findings. The biopsy of a nonulcerated skin lesion showed pseudoepitheliomatous epidermal hyperplasia with neutrophilic microabscesses (Fig. 2a). A dermal diffuse and nodular granulomatous mixed infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytes, giant cells, numerous eosinophils, and neutrophilic microabscesses was seen in all tissues examined. Septate hyphae were present both within giant cells and free in the dermis (Fig. 2b). The hyphae were branching at a 45 degrees angle and were positive on periodic acid-Schiff and Grocott methenamine silver stains (Fig. 2c). Fungal culture studies of material taken from an ulcerated skin lesion grew aspergillus flavus. blood cultures were negative for Aspergillus sp. or other microorganisms. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin b, but the medication was discontinued due to her intolerance to the drug. She was subsequently lost to follow-up.
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ranking = 1.3896774574452
keywords = nasal
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29/326. Team approach for closure of oroantral and oronasal fistulae.

    Oroantral and oronasal fistulas present with a broad range of causation, size, duration, and extent of infection involving the nose and paranasal sinuses. Accurate diagnosis of the extent of the disease with appropriate radiographic evaluation will guide the surgeon to select an approach that addresses all of the infected sites. When significant sinus disease is found, an endoscopic approach to restoring drainage in all of the involved sinuses can promote predictably successful closure of oroantral and oronasal fistulas. The multispecialty team approach to this disease, with the concomitant management of the sinusitis and fistula closure, is a significant advance in the successful management of this chronic condition.
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ranking = 1.1264516382968
keywords = nasal, nose
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30/326. Primary sinonasal amyloidosis.

    Primary amyloidosis localized to the sinonasal tract is extremely rare with only 20 reported cases in the English literature. We describe a further case and review the literature.
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ranking = 0.772043031914
keywords = nasal
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