Cases reported "Paranasal Sinus Diseases"

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1/16. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    We report a case of a 28-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during induction chemotherapy. This life-threatening fungal infection is an infrequent cause of neutropenic fever, and is occasionally found in patients with leukemia and lymphoma, or patients with severely compromised defence mechanisms due to other diseases. It is caused by moulds belonging to the Mucoraceae family, and is characterized by local destruction of the affected organ. In our patient, the infection spread from the paranasal sinuses to the right orbit, destroyed intraorbital structures and resulted in blindness within days. biopsy from the right maxillary sinus was performed and mucormycosis was suspected through microscopic examination. culture of the resected specimen identified rhizopus arrhizus as the causing agent. Treatment of zygomycosis should consist of radical surgical debridement of the infected tissue, together with intensive broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy with amphotericin b. What could be learned from this case is, that aggressive approaches to identify the cause of infection is necessary, and that aggressive treatment strategies are inevitable to overcome the infection. Furthermore, treatment of the underlying disease should be continued as soon as possible.
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keywords = zygomycosis
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2/16. An unusual presentation of rhinofacial zygomycosis due to cunninghamella sp. in an immunocompetent patient: a case report and literature review.

    zygomycosis is a rare fungal infection usually found in immunocompromised patients. It is a rapidly progressing infection with a high mortality rate. Our report describes an unusual case of rhinofacial zygomycosis due to cunninghamella sp. in an immunocompetent patient, who presented with a slowly progressive swelling of the left cheek. An interrupted course of amphotericin b treatment caused regression of the lesion. drug therapy was abandoned due to impairment of renal function. The patient was clinically and radiologically disease free for 2 years following cessation of therapy.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
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3/16. Rhinoentomophthoromycosis.

    A sixty year old patient presented with a slowly progressive swelling of the nose, of one year duration, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of subcutaneous zygomycosis. On investigation, the tissue fungal culture grew conidiobolus coronatus, confirming the diagnosis as rhinoentomophthoromycosis. He was treated with a combination of oral fluconazole and oral potassium iodide for a total period of 5 months. His symptoms subsided completely. Serial CT scanning of paranasal sinuses showed the gradual resolution of the swelling, in response to the treatment. Early detection of the disease and combination therapy gave rapid and good results. This is the first case of its kind to be reported from Kerala, the southern state of india.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = zygomycosis
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4/16. Rare infections of nose and paranasal sinuses.

    Two cases of fungal infection of the nose and paranasal sinuses by rhinophycomycosis and actinomycosis are reported. The clinical diagnoses in both cases were wrong and in one of them, a malignancy was suspected. These cases are the first to be reported from Central nigeria. The authors feel that fungal granuloma should be included on the differential diagnoses list for patients with swellings of the nose and paranasal sinuses in this environment.
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ranking = 0.74937103931646
keywords = phycomycosis
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5/16. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    Rhinocerebral phycomycosis is a serious and commonly fatal fungal infection. The causative organism, ordinarily a saprophyte, becomes pathogenic in persons who are made susceptible by coexisting, debilitating disease. We report a well-documented case of rhinocerebral phycomycosis where early diagnosis led to successful treatment, and we discuss important aspects of the clinical evaluation and management of such cases.
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ranking = 1.4987420786329
keywords = phycomycosis
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6/16. zygomycosis of the maxillary sinus and palate caused by Basidiobolus haptosporus.

    Basidiobolus haptosporus is known to cause subcutaneous zygomycosis in tropical africa and asia. We cared for a 49-year-old hyperglycemic, asplenic man who had never traveled outside the united states and who was seen initially for a painless palatal ulcer with cutaneous hypesthesia of the right cheek and upper lip. An invasive process involved the right middle nasal turbinate, maxillary antrum, maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve, and bony palate. Histological examination of biopsy tissue showed necrotizing granulomata with broad, nonseptate hyphae. Basidiobolus haptosporus was cultured from this tissue. Various laboratory studies revealed no immunologic defect and his lesions responded to therapy with amphotericin b. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of zygomycosis caused by B haptosporus in the americas and the first culture-documented case of invasive mycosis caused by this mold.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = zygomycosis
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7/16. Rhinomaxillary phycomycosis: report of case.

    A case of rhinomaxillary phycomycosis has been reported. Although the occurrence of the phycomycetes-type of infection is relatively rare, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon should be alert for debilitated patients, especially uncontrolled diabetics, who may show the incipient signs and symptoms of this opportunistic fungal disease.
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ranking = 3.7468551965823
keywords = phycomycosis
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8/16. Orbital phycomycosis.

    3 cases with rhinoorbital phycomycosis and a 4th case, in which it was considered retrospectively, are presented in hematological patients. 2 of the 4 patients survived. In the first 3 cases, which appeared in a period of 2 months in the hematology Unit, an epidemiological study was made, showing that the cause of the infections was contamination of the air-conditioning systems of this unit by numerous Phycomycetes and Mucor pusillus.
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ranking = 3.7468551965823
keywords = phycomycosis
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9/16. Cephalic phycomycosis: a report of eight cases.

    Phycomycosis is the preferred terminology to define a fungal disease which may be devastating and fatal. It is caused by a nonseptate hyphae, class phycomycetes and genus (rhizopus, Mucor, absidia). Phycomycosis in man is usually associated with debilitating diseases such as: diabetes mellitus, leukemia and immunosuppressive conditions. The cephalic phycomycosis has two forms: 1. rhino-orbital cerebral which may be fatal, and 2. rhino-paranasal sinuses form which usually has a benign clinical course. From 1943 to 1967, only 45 cases of the cephalic form were described with a mortality rate of 50%. Since then several series have been added to the literature with improved survival, probably due to the addition of amphotericin b to the therapy. Even with modern therapy, the mortality rate is still about 30%. Modern technology C.T. scan is very helpful to establish orbital and intracranial extension. When intracranial involvement is present, the prognosis is dismal. Our series of 8 patients is reported.
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ranking = 3.7468551965823
keywords = phycomycosis
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10/16. Invasive sinonasal disease due to scopulariopsis candida: case report and review of scopulariopsosis.

    Sinonasal infection with fungi of the order mucorales--termed mucormycosis or zygomycosis--is sometimes seen in immunosuppressed patients, including those with diabetic ketoacidosis and malignancy. We describe a case of invasive sinonasal infection with scopulariopsis candida (not among the mucorales organisms) in a 12-year-old girl who was being treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Only a few cases of invasive infection with scopulariopsis species have been reported previously; five of six of these cases were associated with persistent or fatal disease. Our patient survived without undergoing radical surgical debridement and was treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, amphotericin b, and itraconazole; chemotherapy was stopped. in vitro susceptibility testing of our patient's scopulariopsis isolate showed that it was resistant to amphotericin b and that it was relatively susceptible to itraconazole and miconazole. The case described herein demonstrates the expanding spectrum of fungal organisms that may cause invasive sinonasal infection in immunocompromised hosts and the need for reliable antifungal susceptibility testing.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = zygomycosis
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