Cases reported "Paranasal Sinus Diseases"

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11/16. Phycomycosis in an apparently normal host.

    A case presentation of phycomycosis recognized by histology but unproved by cultural methods is presented. The patient was successfully treated with amphotericin b. Even though specific genus of phycomycosis was not identified, the clinical characteristics and apparently healthy host suggest the possibility of the fungus being of the order of entomophthorales. classification, pathophysiology, various clinical types, diagnostic aids, and principles of treatment are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = phycomycosis
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12/16. iron overload is a risk factor for zygomycosis.

    Well-recognized risk factors for zygomycosis include diabetic ketoacidosis, immunocompromise, and deferoxamine therapy for iron or aluminum overload, usually in patients undergoing kidney dialysis. We report a case of fatal nasal-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an 82-year-old man with known myelodysplasia and well-controlled diabetes. He was not receiving deferoxamine. Despite radical surgery and amphotericin b therapy, he died; primary hemochromatosis with gross iron overload was found post mortem. Experimental evidence suggests iron overload without deferoxamine therapy may be a risk factor for zygomycosis; the findings in this case would support this hypothesis.
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ranking = 0.77843058075132
keywords = zygomycosis
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13/16. Craniofacial zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans.

    A fatal case of craniofacial zygomycosis caused by Apophysomyces elegans in a 52-year-old man was diagnosed by the presence of broad aseptate, branched hyaline hyphae in tissue from paranasal sinuses and surrounding areas, and isolation of the fungus from the same tissue. The patient suffered from idiopathic myelofibrosis as underlying disease, he was thrombocytopenic and was mildly hyperglycaemic. The infection represents the second case of craniofacial zygomycosis due to A. elegans.
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ranking = 0.66722621207256
keywords = zygomycosis
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14/16. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis.

    An unusual case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis with its clinical and histopathological features are presented. A good response was observed with oral itraconazole at a dose of 200 mg day-1 for a period of 3 months. To our knowledge, it is the first case report of this infection, involving the maxillary sinus, eye and the brain, from Madras, Tamilnadu, india.
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ranking = 0.5560218433938
keywords = zygomycosis
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15/16. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with amphotericin b colloidal dispersion in three patients.

    Rhinocerebral mucormycosis (zygomycosis) primarily affects diabetic or immunosuppressed patients and typically progresses rapidly, necessitating surgical excision and antifungal therapy with amphotericin b. Large doses of amphotericin b are required for cure, causing significant renal toxicity. amphotericin b colloidal dispersion (ABCD; Amphocil, Sequus Pharmaceuticals, Menlo Park, CA) is a 1:1 complex of cholesteryl sulfate and amphotericin b, which results in significant reduction of toxicity, especially nephrotoxicity. We describe three patients with life-threatening rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with ABCD. All patients had high serum creatinine levels due to prior treatment with amphotericin b; these levels reverted to normal during treatment with ABCD. Two patients with diabetes mellitus were cured after receiving a combination of surgery and ABCD therapy. The third patient, who had myelodysplastic syndrome, had an initial good response, with cure of the fungal infection; however, he eventually died of his primary illness. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed clinical description of the treatment of mucormycosis with ABCD.
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ranking = 0.11120436867876
keywords = zygomycosis
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16/16. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis following bone marrow transplantation in chronic myelogenous leukaemia. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    We report on a man suffering from chronic myelogenous leukaemia treated by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation who, in the late post-transplantation phase, developed a hyperacute fatal invasive rhinocerebral zygomycosis. The origin of the ascending infection was the sinus sphenoidalis from which fungal hyphae spread to the central nervous system via the skull and the dura mater. The first symptoms of this severe infection were cerebral convulsions and a bilateral total amaurosis. The isolation of the pathogen from post mortem tissue was not successful. The present case is compared with previous reports of zygomycoses after bone marrow transplantation.
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ranking = 0.5560218433938
keywords = zygomycosis
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