Cases reported "Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms"

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1/41. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor in sinonasal region.

    An elderly woman having a nasal tumor diagnosed as alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma was referred to our hospital. Histological reexamination of the patient revealed that the tumor was composed of lobules of compactly arranged small round atypical cells. The atypical cells contained large oval to round vesicular nuclei, and scanty cytoplasm showing PAS positive glycogen material. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for NSE, S-100 protein and vimentin, but showed negative reaction for myoglobin, desmin, EMA, keratin, LCA, chromogranin and MIC2. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells contained a few cluster of glycogen particles and less organellae and filaments, and there were no cytoplasmic processes, neurosecretory granules or neurofilaments. Pathological findings suggested primitive neuroectodermal tumor resembling extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma, but negative reaction for MIC2 immunohistochemically could not ascertain the diagnosis. Location of the tumor and age of the patient of the present case were unusual.
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ranking = 1
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma, alveolar
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2/41. Sinus polyp-associated soft tissue lesion and unilateral blindness: complications of extraction in leukemic patient.

    A case of an inflammatory polyp-associated lesion extending through an extraction socket appearing as an intraoral nodular lesion and unilateral blindness secondary to leukemic optic nerve head infiltration is reported. The patient was a 28-year-old male whose his upper first molar had been extracted fifteen days previously. The lesion was an asymptomatic soft tissue mass, red in color and hot tender to palpation, involving the alveolar ridge in the maxillary molar area. Although this is apparently a rare occurrence, the nature of the lesion was suggested by the history, clinical appearance, and radiographic findings. Excision of the inflammatory lesion was followed by complete healing with closure of the lesion. Unfortunately, the blindness was irreversible. The patient is still under leukemia therapy. review of the literature did not yield any other such cases. The role of oral lesions as a diagnostic indicator and the importance of dental surgeons in the diagnosis of leukemic patients are discussed. It is concluded that proper precautions and meticulous early diagnosis are required in these patients and that dental practitioners should be aware of the diagnostic features and possibilities of oral complications associated with leukemia.
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ranking = 0.0048903691022617
keywords = alveolar
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3/41. Botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma of the nose: pitfalls of pathology.

    A 2-year-old Swiss boy was referred to our hospital because of an obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with suspected recurrent choanal polyp. During surgery, a polypoid soft mass was found in the right nose and extirpated. The histology of the resected polypoid tumor seemed compatible with a polyp; however, immunohistochemistry revealed a botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma. Rhabdomyosarcomas are rare. The most important differential diagnoses for rhabdomyosarcoma are discussed and methods available for differentiating are included.
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ranking = 5.9706577853864
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma
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4/41. Sinonasal radiation-associated osteosarcoma after combined therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma of the nose.

    radiation-associated (RA) osteosarcomas (OS) are exceptional in children, presenting more frequently in middle-aged and elderly patients. This is a case report of RA-OS of the sinonasal cavities in a 13-yr-old girl after combined therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the nose diagnosed at the age of five. The treatment of choice is radical surgery with wide margins and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite an episode of recurrence, at the present time the patient is alive and free of disease 5 yr after the initial treatment of OS. The association between radiation, chemotherapy and sarcomas is reviewed and discussed.
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ranking = 4.9755481544887
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma
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5/41. Potential reduction of the incidence of radiation-induced second cancers by using proton beams in the treatment of pediatric tumors.

    PURPOSE: To assess the potential influence of improved dose distribution with proton beams compared to conventional or intensity-modulated (IM) X-ray beams on the incidence of treatment-induced secondary cancers in pediatric oncology. methods AND MATERIALS: Two children, one with a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and a second with a medulloblastoma, were used as models for the purpose of this study. After defining the target and critical structures, treatment plans were calculated and optimized, four for the RMS case (conventional X-ray, IM x-rays, protons, and IM protons) and three for the irradiation of the spinal axis in medulloblastoma (conventional X-ray, IM x-rays, protons). Secondary cancer incidence was estimated using a model based on Publication No. 60 of the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. This model allowed estimation of absolute risks of secondary cancer for each treatment plan based on dose-volume distributions for the nontarget organs. RESULTS: Proton beams reduced the expected incidence of radiation-induced secondary cancers for the RMS patient by a factor of >or=2 and for the medulloblastoma case by a factor of 8 to 15 when compared with either IM or conventional X-ray plans. CONCLUSIONS: The potential for a significant reduction in secondary cancers with pediatric cancers after using proton beams (forward planned or IM) in the treatment of RMS and MBD in children and adolescents represents an additional argument supporting the development of proton therapy for most radiotherapy indications in pediatric oncology.
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ranking = 0.99510963089774
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma
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6/41. A rare case of metastases to the maxillary sinus from sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma.

    Metastases of malignant tumors to the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are rare. A review of the world's literature reports only four cases of antral metastases from carcinoma of gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of a stenosing adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon with metastases within the maxillary sinus. The ENT physical examination revealed a mass involving the right alveolar ridge, the right hard palate. CT scan of the head and the neck showed a large and irregular mass involving the right maxillary sinus, the infratemporal fossa and the pterygoid muscles with resorption of the bone of the posterior portion of the right alveolar ridge and of the posterior wall of the right maxillary sinus. The neoplastic tissue showed marked positivity for CEA and expressed cytokeratin 20, confirming the diagnosis of metastases to the maxillary sinus from colorectal adenocarcinoma. When a differential diagnosis between a second primary tumor of the maxillary sinus and a metastasis has to be carried out, the gastrointestinal tract should be taken into account and detailed immunohistochemical should be performed.
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ranking = 0.0097807382045235
keywords = alveolar
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7/41. Pediatric sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma: three cases and a review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: To understand the clinical presentation, management, and natural history of paranasal rhabdomyosarcoma. DESIGN: Retrospective case series review. methods: Retrospective medical record review of patients less than 20 years of age who presented to our facility with rhabdomyosarcoma of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. RESULTS: medical records of all pediatric patients seen in our pediatric otolaryngology clinic were reviewed from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2000. Three patients were identified with sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma. Their presentation, evaluation, and treatment were evaluated. Relevant literature 1966 to the present was reviewed with the assistance of medline. CONCLUSIONS: rhabdomyosarcoma is an aggressive pediatric malignancy, requiring a high index of suspicion to detect it in its earliest stages. patients with suggestive symptoms should undergo a full evaluation including nasal endoscopy and imaging. Because the current chemotherapy protocols are more effective on localized disease, early diagnosis is crucial to patient survival.
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ranking = 6.9657674162842
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma
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8/41. Esthesioneuroblastoma. A case report.

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a rare neuroectodermal tumor originating from the olfactory mucosa and therefore usually arising from the nasopharynx. A case in which the diagnosis was made in connection with the extraction of a tooth is reported. Manifestation in the dento-alveolar region is unusual for this tumor. The case presented is also unusual in that the classic symptoms of ENB were not present. Diagnosis, classification, and therapy are described with a brief review of the literature.
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ranking = 0.0048903691022617
keywords = alveolar
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9/41. Alveolar soft part sarcoma: report of a case occurring in the sinonasal region.

    A primary alveolar soft part sarcoma arising in the nasal-paranasal sinuses region is quite rare. In this report, a 14-year-old boy with typical features of alveolar soft part sarcoma of the nasal and paranasal sinuses is presented. Treatment was surgical excision of the mass combined with radiotherapy. There has been no recurrence or metastasis as of 2 years after treatment.
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ranking = 0.0097807382045235
keywords = alveolar
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10/41. An unusual case of rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as orbital apex syndrome.

    PRECIS: A 12-year-old female presented with symptoms and signs of orbital apex syndrome (OAS), secondary to stage IV alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) originating in the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, unusual in its presentation as orbital apex syndrome and also its origin from the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses. DESIGN:: Observational case report. methods: Ophthalmologic findings, neuroimaging, medical and surgical intervention, histopathologic analysis, and clinical course are described. RESULTS: A 12-year-old female presented with progressive visual loss in her left eye, difficulty with eye movements, and mild headache. Her examination was consistent with orbital apex syndrome. Imaging with contrast revealed a mass originating in the left sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses invading the left optic canal. Emergent biopsy was interpreted as alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma; subsequent metastatic work-up revealed bone marrow metastases. The patient was diagnosed with stage IV alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and immediately started on combination orbital radiation therapy (RT) and systemic chemotherapy. She experienced gradual improvement of ocular motility, though her optic neuropathy persisted. CONCLUSION: Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of paranasal origin, specifically from the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, should be included in the differential diagnosis for orbital apex syndrome in children.
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ranking = 8.9755481544887
keywords = rhabdomyosarcoma, alveolar
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