Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/17. New corneal findings in human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection.

    PURPOSE: Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 is a rna retrovirus that primarily affects CD4 T-cells. Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection is the established cause of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive malignancy of CD4 T-cells, and two nonneoplastic conditions: human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 uveitis. Other reported ophthalmic manifestations of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection include lymphomatous and leukemic infiltrates in the eye and ocular adnexa in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, retinal pigmentary degeneration, and neuro-ophthalmic disorders in patients with human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and keratoconjunctivitis sicca, episcleritis, and sclerouveitis in asymptomatic human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 carriers. This report describes the ocular findings in three Jamaican patients with human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. methods: The clinical records of three patients with human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma examined at the National eye Institute were reviewed. Each patient had one or more complete ophthalmic evaluations. RESULTS: All three patients had corneal abnormalities, including corneal haze and central opacities with thinning; bilateral immunoprotein keratopathy; and peripheral corneal thinning, scarring, and neovascularization. All three patients had elevated serum immunoglobulin levels. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the novel corneal findings in these patients are most likely a consequence of the hypergammaglobulinemia induced by the human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection or the T-cell malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/17. Localization of retrovirus in the central nervous system of a patient co-infected with HTLV-1 and HIV with HAM/TSP and HIV-associated dementia.

    persons co-infected with HTLV-1 and HIV are at increased risk for neurologic disease. These patients may develop HAM/TSP and/or HIV-associated dementia. In this study, we localized cells infected with retrovirus in the central nervous system (CNS) of a patient with both HAM/TSP and HIV-associated dementia. HTLV-1 was localized to astrocytes and HIV to macrophage/microglia. There was no co-infection of a single cell phenotype in this patient. These data suggest that mechanisms other than co-infection of the same CNS cell may play a role in the development of neurologic disease in patients dual infected with HTLV-1 and HIV.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/17. HTLV-II infection associated with a chronic neurodegenerative disease: clinical and molecular analysis.

    HTLV II is a retrovirus endemic in some Amerindian tribes and spread worldwide with a high prevalence among intravenous drug abusers. It has three different genetic subtypes a, b, and d, defined mainly by the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. HTLV II has been associated with a neurodegenerative disease in few cases. We describe the first well-documented case in brazil where the virus is endemic in isolated ethnic groups. The patient is a 55-year-old woman with a chronic and painful syndrome characterized by spastic paraparesis, hyperactive reflexes and spastic bladder. Somatosensory evoked potential indicates a thoracic spinal cord lesion. Computer tomography showed periventricular demyelination. enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive for HTLV I/II whereas the discriminatory Western blot was indeterminate. Molecular analysis of the Tax region revealed a HTLV II pattern that was also confirmed through sequencing the LTR region. Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR sequence shows an HTLV IIa subtype that clustered with the virus isolated from Kayapo Indians and Brazilian urban intravenous drug users. Indeterminate Western blots are frequently found using commercial kits, therefore we recommend that all cases in which a myelopathy is associated with an indeterminate serological result should be evaluated by PCR to determine the actual number of HTLV II associated myelopathy cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/17. Progressive spastic myelopathy in a patient co-infected with hiv-1 and HTLV-II: autoantibodies to the human homologue of rig in blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

    OBJECTIVE: Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are closely related human retroviruses. HTLV-I has been implicated in a chronic progressive myelopathy, known as tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) or HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). We sought to determine whether autoantibodies to brain antigens were present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a patient with chronic progressive spastic myelopathy with evidence of both hiv-1 infection and HTLV-I/II seropositivity. DESIGN: A 54-year-old bisexual man with clinical features of HAM/TSP of over 20 years' duration was followed. methods: We applied discriminatory dna amplification (polymerase chain reaction) to distinguish HTLV-I from HTLV-II and to verify co-infection with hiv-1. The patient's CSF was used to screen a human brain cDNA expression library to identify antibodies directed against brain antigens. Autoreactive bacteriophage clones were isolated and sequenced. RESULTS: The patient was found to be co-infected with both hiv-1 and HTLV-II, but not with HTLV-I. HTLV-II proviral levels in the peripheral blood remained relatively constant, despite therapy with zidovudine. Prominent oligoclonal banding of immunoglobulins was present in the patient's CSF. A single repeatedly reactive cDNA clone was identified, by screening with CSF antibody, sequenced, and found to be the human homologue of the rat insulinoma gene, rig. CONCLUSIONS: HTLV-II infection may predispose to development of a HAM/TSP-like illness. Autoimmune mechanisms, such as autoantibody formation, may play a role in pathogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/17. Characterization of two human lymphoid cell lines producing human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) isolated from patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy or encephalopathy.

    Two cell lines, CNS-5 and CNS-6, were established by cocultivation of sedimented cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from two anti-human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) antibody-positive male patients with encephalopathy and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, respectively, with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy seronegative female. These cell lines, possessing a normal female karyotype, revealed similar characteristics as follows; they expressed HTLV-I-related antigens, they produced C-type retrovirus particles, HTLV-I provirus genomes were integrated into their DNAs, and they had CD4 activated T-cell markers. In addition, immunocytochemical and immunoelectron microscopic studies showed peculiar immunoreactivity of these cell lines with anti-alpha/beta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) antibodies; beta Fl, defining beta chain epitope, was only positive in the perinuclear spaces and rough endoplasmic reticulum in some cells, and WT31, recognizing alpha/beta framework, was mostly negative, while CD3 was expressed in the majority of the cells. These facts indicate that HTLV-I-infected cells were present in CSF of these two patients, and suggest that neurological disorders associated with HTLV-I may not be restricted to myelopathy and may include brain abnormalities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/17. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) confirmed by PCR-Southern blot and sequencing analysis in a woman with tropical spastic paraparesis.

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus and the aetiological agent of a progressive neurological disease called tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM), as confirmed by evidence accumulated in HTLV-I seroprevalence studies. TSP/HAM is rarely diagnosed in italy, given the low prevalence of HTLV-I in the population. TSP/HAM begins insidiously in the fourth decade, mainly with spastic paraparesis of the lower extremities and positive Babinski reflex, as well as interfering with bowel and bladder functions. In this study we report the clinical, virological and haemato chemical data of a 54-year-old woman, born in the Ivory Cost, with symptoms suggestive of TSP. The presence of HTLV-I infection was demonstrated by the detection of antibodies in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid by immunoenzymatic assay and Western blot analysis. In addition, viral isolation was carried out in peripheral blood cells, and the presence of HTLV-I proviral dna was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction/Southern blot and sequencing analysis. According to our results, HTLV-I testing might be useful when TSP/HAM is suspected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/17. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy. A case report.

    Tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) has been reported from various parts of the world for several decades. Recently reports have emerged from japan and also countries in tropical zones associating endemic TSP with abnormally high titres of antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Data indicate that this lymphotropic retrovirus is neuropathogenic, either by direct invasion or via immunopathological mechanisms. A South African man is described who met the diagnostic criteria of TSP. Both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were antibody-positive for HTLV-I. It is possible that HTLV-I infection may be implicated in the 'myelopathies of undetermined cause' that form a substantial subgroup of spinal cord disease occurring in black South Africans.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/17. Steroid-responsive myeloneuropathy in a man dually infected with hiv-1 and HTLV-I.

    Two human retroviruses, hiv-1 and HTLV-I, have been associated with myelopathies in addition to other neurologic disorders. We report an American dually infected with hiv-1 and HTLV-I who developed steroid-responsive myeloneuropathy. This 28-year-old bisexual man developed interstitial pneumonitis and a transient midthoracic sensory level followed by the evolution of a slowly progressive spastic paraparesis and sensorimotor neuropathy. Serologic studies demonstrated coinfection with both hiv-1 and HTLV-I. Peripheral blood absolute CD4 count was persistently within the normal range. Cranial MRI was normal and spinal MRI showed T3-T10 atrophy. Serial CSF analyses demonstrated marked intrathecal synthesis of anti-HTLV-I IgG, lymphocytic pleocytosis, elevated protein and immunoglobulin g, and oligoclonal bands. hiv-1 was isolated from CSF but not from peripheral nerve. Lymphoproliferative studies confirmed spontaneous proliferation in both blood and CSF. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor and soluble CD8 were greatly elevated in blood and CSF when compared with patients with HIV-related vacuolar myelopathy and seronegative patients with other causes of myelopathy. Nerve biopsy showed epi- and endoneurial CD8 lymphocytic infiltration without vasculitis; muscle biopsy showed features of acute and chronic denervation. A 6-week course of prednisone produced sustained improvement in leg strength and walking times. We speculate that the myeloneuropathy was caused by HTLV-I in the setting of coinfection with hiv-1.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/17. Retrovirus from human T-cell leukemia virus type I-associated myelopathy is the same strain as a prototype human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    A retrovirus was isolated from a T-cell line that was established from lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with human T-cell leukemia virus type I-associated myelopathy (HAM), and its genome was sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the 3' half of the total genome was identical in 99.5% of the nucleotides to that of the prototype human T-cell leukemia virus type I that was derived from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia. These results indicate that the same retrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type I is associated with both a neurological disease, HAM, and a lymphoproliferative disease, adult T-cell leukemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/17. Comparison of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I strain from cerebrospinal fluid of a Jamaican patient with tropical spastic paraparesis with a prototype human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I.

    The isolation and characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic retrovirus related to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) from cerebrospinal fluid of a Jamaican patient with tropical spastic paraparesis is described. The virus isolate is a typical type C retrovirus as seen by electron microscopy and is related to prototype HTLV-I isolated from patients with adult T-cell leukemia but is not identical to this prototype HTLV-I as seen by restriction enzyme mapping.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = retrovirus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Paraparesis, Tropical Spastic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.