Cases reported "Paraparesis"

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1/3. paraparesis after lumbar puncture in a male with leukemia.

    A diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed in a 12-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Because of thrombocytopenia (platelet count 42,000/mm(3)), a platelet transfusion was given immediately before the lumbar puncture. However, the platelet count was not re-examined. The patient developed progressive paraparesis shortly after the lumbar puncture. magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extensive spinal subdural hematoma from the T2 to S2 level. This case report illustrates the sometimes dramatic consequences of lumbar puncture in patients with childhood leukemia. Guidelines for the examination of the platelet count and correction of thrombocytopenia before lumbar puncture are discussed.
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2/3. paraparesis after excision of intrathoracic meningoceles in a patient with neurofibromatosis.

    Intrathoracic meningocele associated with neurofibromatosis is a rarity. We treated a 16-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis, marked kyphoscoliosis, and two right-sided intrathoracic meningoceles. Because his chief complaints of cough and chest pain were thought to be caused by the meningoceles, resection of these lesions was performed prior to correction of the spinal deformity. On the day after the resection, complete paraplegia developed, followed by recovery to paraparesis. Decompressive lumbar puncture was performed, but intraspinal pressure was normal. Postoperative spinal cord damage and consequent paresis may have resulted from a loss of pressure buffering by the meningocele, which rendered the cord vulnerable to injury. The possibility of a similar unusual complication should be borne in mind when treating patients with intrathoracic meningocele associated with neurofibromatosis.
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3/3. Spinal paraparesis due to leukemic meningitis in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Leukemic meningitis is a rare manifestation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and typically occurs in advanced stages. We report the case of a 71-year-old male in whom Binet A, Rai 1 stage CLL was diagnosed in June 2002. The stage called for a "watch and wait" strategy. Six months later the patient presented with paraparesis. magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed no abnormalities. Lumbar puncture disclosed xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with 1003 cells/microl, 95% atypical lymphocytes. flow cytometry confirmed typical features of CLL. Intrathecal injections of methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside and corticosteroids did not substantially reduce the CSF cell count and failed to improve the neurological symptoms. Two weeks later the patient developed a pulmonary embolism complicated by fatal secondary pneumonia. Leukemic meningitis is a rare manifestation of CLL, especially in early stages. Selective spinal paraparesis as the first symptom of meningitis in CLL is even rarer and has been reported only once.
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