Cases reported "Paraplegia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/183. Special problems associated with abdominal aneurysmectomy in spinal cord injury patients.

    There were 8 patients with spinal cord injury in the last 100 consecutive patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm resected at the Long Beach veterans Administration Hospital. Emphasis is placed upon the problems in management not found in individuals without spinal cord injury. A successful outcome is dependent upon: (a) aggressive control of foci of infection, (b) early diagnosis and planned surgical intervention, (c) continuous intraoperative arterial and central venous pressure monitoring and (d) alertness to the prevention of postoperative complications, with emphasis upon careful tracheal toilet and anticipation of delayed wound healing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/183. Spinal cord vascular injuries following surgery of advanced thoracic neuroblastoma: an unusual catastrophic complication.

    BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury is a possible complication associated with removal of thoracic dumbbell neuroblastomas. Our experience with two children whose postsurgical course was complicated by midthoracic spinal cord ischemia is reported there. Permanent paraplegia resulted in both. PROCEDURE AND RESULTS: Preoperative awareness of the origin and distribution of the Adamkiewicz artery (arteria radiculomedullaris magna, ARMM) and of the possible collateral pathways for spinal cord blood supply may be helpful in the planning of operations that involve dissection in the midthoracic posterior mediastinum. Otherwise, a flaccid paraplegia may result. CONCLUSIONS: The syndrome is presumed to be triggered by a spasm, an embolism, or a iatrogenic interruption of the ARMM.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/183. Nontraumatic acute spinal subdural hematoma: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    Acute subdural spinal hematoma occurs rarely; however, when it does occur, it may have disastrous consequences. The authors assessed the outcome of surgery for this lesion in relation to causative factors and diagnostic imaging (computerized tomography [CT], CT myelography), as well as eventual preservation of the subarachnoid space. The authors reviewed 106 cases of nontraumatic acute subdural spinal hematoma (101 published cases and five of their own) in terms of cause, diagnosis, treatment, and long-term outcome. Fifty-one patients (49%) were men and 55 (51%) were women. In 70% of patients the spinal segment involved was in the lumbar or thoracolumbar spine. In 57 cases (54%) there was a defect in the hemostatic mechanism. spinal puncture was performed in 50 patients (47%). Late surgical treatment was performed in 59 cases (56%): outcome was good in 25 cases (42%) (in 20 of these patients preoperative neurological evaluation had shown mild deficits or paraparesis, and three patients had presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]). The outcome was poor in 34 cases (58%; 23 patients with paraplegia and 11 with SAH). The formation of nontraumatic acute spinal subdural hematomas may result from coagulation abnormalities and iatrogenic causes such as spinal puncture. Their effect on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots may be limited to a mere compressive mechanism when the subarachnoid space is preserved and the hematoma is confined between the dura and the arachnoid. It seems likely that the theory regarding the opening of the dural compartment, verified at the cerebral level, is applicable to the spinal level too. Early surgical treatment is always indicated when the patient's neurological status progressively deteriorates. The best results can be obtained in patients who do not experience SAH. In a few selected patients in whom neurological impairment is minimal, conservative treatment is possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/183. Non-traumatic acute paraplegia associated with cervical disc herniation: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Acute paraplegia attributable to disc herniation is known to occur most frequently at the thoracic level. We report a rare case of non-traumatic acute paraplegia caused by disc herniation at the cervical level. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the present case demonstrated a spinal cord lesion as a cause of paraplegia. Although this symptom is believed to disappear rapidly after surgical treatment, there have been a few reported cases with poor neurologic recovery and permanent deficits. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 61-year-old female with a history of minor neck pain suffered from non-traumatic acute paraplegia attributable to cervical disc herniation. She underwent emergency surgery consisting of vertebrectomy, removal of herniated discs, and anterior fusion. Postoperative neurologic improvement was slow due to the cervical spinal cord lesion at the central portion of the cord, which was detected by the preoperative and postoperative MRIs. CONCLUSION: We emphasize that the MRI study is crucial for the management of patients with acute neck pain associated with cervical canal stenosis. Surgical treatment should not be delayed to avoid permanent neurologic deficits. Anterior decompression with vertebrectomy is recommended to decompress the injured spinal cord in the narrow cervical spinal canal; however, a cord lesion detected by MRI may indicate an incomplete surgical outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/183. Primary hydatid disease of the spine: an unusual cause of progressive paraplegia. Case report and review of the literature.

    Although rare, spinal hydatid disease is a manifestation of hydatid infestation. The authors present the report of a patient who presented with primary spinal hydatid disease. This disease is often misdiagnosed as tuberculous spondylitis, and thus patients may subsequently receive inappropriate treatment. The patient in this case presented, with an increasing weakness in the lower limbs, to a different clinic from an area in india where hydatid infections are endemic. The infection was misdiagnosed as tuberculous spondolytis based on evaluation of plain x-ray films, and the patient underwent antituberculous chemotherapy and a posterior surgical decompressive procedure. The patient presented to the authors' clinic with increasing paraparesis 1.5 years later. Radiographs and a magnetic resonance image of the spine were obtained, which strongly suggested hydatid disease. Examination of serum levels confirmed the diagnosis. The patient underwent a decompressive procedure of the spine in which stabilization was performed. Postoperatively her paraparesis resolved, and good control over the disease was achieved by chemotherapy. The authors conclude that primary spinal hydatid disease of the spine, although a rare manifestation, should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with infectious and destructive lesions of the spine in regions in which the disease is endemic. Advanced imaging studies should be performed to diagnose the disease. Early decompressive surgery with stabilization of the spine, in addition to adjuvant chemotherapy, is the treatment of choice for these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/183. paraplegia following intraaortic balloon circulatory assistance.

    Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation is frequently used in patients experiencing severe ventricular dysfunction following maximal drug therapy. However, even with the improvement of percutaneous insertion techniques, the procedure has always been followed by vascular; infectious, and neurological complications. This article describes a case of paraplegia due to intraaortic balloon counterpulsation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/183. 'Shared spinal cord' scenario: paraplegia following abdominal aortic surgery under combined general and epidural anaesthesia.

    Serious neurological complications of abdominal aortic vascular surgery are rare but devastating for all involved. When epidural blockade is part of the anaesthetic technique such complications may be attributed to needles, catheters or drugs. We present a patient who developed paraplegia following an elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Continuous epidural blockade was part of the anaesthetic technique and postoperative analgesia. In this case the spinal cord damage was explained by ischaemia caused by the aortic surgery. This event has made us aware of a rare complication associated with abdominal aortic surgery and highlighted safety aspects of epidural anaesthesia in such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/183. paraplegia following intraoperative celiac plexus injection.

    The technique for percutaneous and open neurolytic celiac plexus injection, using ethanol or phenol, for relief of intractable pancreatic cancer pain has been well described. Prospective randomized studies, demonstrating safety and efficacy with few complications, have led to widespread acceptance and use of this palliative procedure. The complications of neurolytic celiac plexus injection are rare, and are usually minor. However, transient or permanent paraplegia has been reported previously in 10 cases. The case described herein represents the third reported case of permanent paraplegia following open intraoperative neurolytic celiac plexus injection using 50% ethanol. The literature surveying the indications for this procedure, routes of administration, known complications, and their pathophysiology are reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/183. hyperbaric oxygenation treatment of acute paraplegia after resection of a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Acute spinal cord ischemic injury after resection of thoracoabdominal aneurysm remains a relatively common and potentially devastating complication. The complete resolution of postoperative paraplegia after resection of a type II thoracoabdominal aneurysm, after treatment with hyperbaric oxygenation, is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/183. Transient paraplegia following elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair. Case report.

    paraplegia is a well known complication after surgery for thoracic and thoraco-abdominal aneurysm but is very rare when the level involved is lower than the renal arteries. It is seen most often after treatment of ruptured aneurysm and very few cases are found in the literature reporting spinal cord ischemia after elective repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A new case of transient paraplegia following elective repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported and different aspects of this complication are discussed. In our case, probably the interruption of blood flow in lumbar arteries and the duration of crossclamping were likely contributive factors and it suggest that a failure to appreciate the significance of collateral sources of spinal cord blood flow may be responsible for at least some cases of postoperative paraplegia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Paraplegia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.