Cases reported "Parasitic Diseases"

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1/4. Pyogenic abscesses and parasitic diseases.

    parasitic diseases which during their course in the host switch the immune system from a T helper 1 to a T helper 2 response may be detrimental to the host, contributing to granuloma formation, eosinophilia, hyper-IgE, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. patients and animals with acute schistosomiasis and hyper-IgE in their serum develop pyogenic liver abscess in the presence of bacteremia caused by staphylococcus aureus. The salmonella-S. mansoni association has also been well documented. The association of tropical pyomyositis (pyogenic muscle abscess) and pyogenic liver abscess with toxocara infection has recently been described in the same context. In tropical countries that may be an interesting explanation for the great morbidity of bacterial diseases. If the association of parasitic infections and pyogenic abscesses and/or fungal diseases are confirmed, there will be a strong case in favor of universal treatment for parasitic diseases to prevent or decrease the morbidity of superinfection with bacteria and fungi.
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2/4. Pseudoparasitic Liesegang structures in perirenal hemorrhagic cysts.

    Periodic structures with equally spaced radial striations identified as Liesegang-like rings were seen in two male patients' hemorrhagic perirenal cysts. The patients, one 48 and the other 60 years old, had acute right-flank pain and anemia; both had nephrectomy. The rings, initially believed to represent parasites (Dioctophyma renale), were from 8 to 500 micron in diameter and had uniform, pink-tan, radially striated double walls. Multiple small rings within a larger ring predominated in one case. Morphologically, the rings differed from D. renale when compared with specimens from animals infected naturally or experimentally with the giant kidney worm. Histochemical and immunoperoxidase tests for iron, calcium, mucopolysaccharides, amyloid, keratin, and hemoglobin had negative results. Energy-dispersive x-ray elemental analysis demonstrated no detectable elements; ultrastructurally, however, the rings displayed a fine fibrillary composition with a concentric and radial pattern. These rings are believed to be an end product of a phenomenon resembling or are, in fact, the Liesegang phenomenon. Because these Liesegang-like structures may be mistaken for parasites on fine-needle aspiration or surgical specimens of hemorrhagic areas, pathologists should be aware of them.
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3/4. Occurrence and impact of zoonoses in pet dogs and cats at US air Force bases.

    A descriptive epidemiologic study was conducted to quantitate the occurrence of zoonoses in pet animals (almost exclusively dogs and cats) at 30 air Force bases in nine regions of the united states during 1980 and 1981. Reviews of reported cases of pet-associated zoonoses in humans at these bases were included. Occurrence of a zoonotic disease in dogs and cats was expressed as a ratio of reported cases per 100 rabies vaccinations (cs/Crv). overall, the four zoonoses reported most frequently from these pets were hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms, and fleas. Annual ratios revealed geographic variations: for example, hookworms in dogs and cats in the southeast ranged from 12.3 to 9.4 cs/Crv; in the northern Great Plains, hookworms ranged from 0.9 to 0.4 cs/Crv. dermatomycoses in the southeast ranged from 1.3 to 1.1 cs/Crv, and in alaska from 0.3 to 0.2 cs/Crv. Quarterly zoonoses occurrence revealed seasonal variations in several regions. Reports of zoonoses in people from these bases indicated that five less frequent zoonoses in dogs and cats (microsporum canis dermatomycosis, fleas, sarcoptes scabiei var canis, gram-positive bacterial infections, and rabies) presented greater acute threats to humans than did the four most frequent zoonoses reported from their pets.
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4/4. Occurrence of the leech Limnatis paluda as a respiratory parasite in man: case report from saudi arabia.

    The leech Limnatis paluda is known to occur as a parasite in the respiratory tract of herbivorous animals. We report the occurrence of Limnatis paluda as a respiratory parasite in man in an area of saudi arabia from which it had not been previously described.
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