Cases reported "Paresis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/20. Toxoplasmic encephalitis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome--four case reports.

    Four patients, all males aged 40-64 years, presented with toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infection manifesting as nonspecific neurological deficits such as epilepsy or hemiparesis. magnetic resonance imaging showed single or multiple lesions with ring enhancement, mimicking metastatic brain tumor or brain abscess. Marked eosinophilia was noted in three patients. Two patients who received anti-toxoplasma chemotherapy in the early stage had a good outcome. However, the other two patients suffered rapid neurological deterioration and needed decompressive surgery, resulting in a poor outcome. toxoplasma diffusely infects the whole central nervous system from the early stage. The outcome for patients who needed emergency surgery was poor. Therefore, this rare but increasingly common infectious disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with neuroimaging findings similar to those of metastatic tumor or brain abscess. Appropriate chemotherapy should be started immediately after hiv-positive reaction is identified in patients with single or multiple mass lesions with ring enhancement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/20. Alternating monomeric paresis with decreased skin temperature and hyperhidrosis in a case of thoracolumbar myelopathy.

    The patient, a Japanese girl with a history suggestive of diffuse encephalitis or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, developed weakness of the right lower limb accompanied by excessive sweating and decreased skin temperature. magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar cord showed abnormal signal intensity with syrinx formation mainly at T12 to L1 vertebral level. paresis and excessive sweating subsided within 3 to 4 months, but recovery of vasomotor function was delayed. Several weeks later, weakness and skin temperature reduction reappeared on the left side without hyperhidrosis, but responded well to oral prednisolone. The patient showed no recurrence during the subsequent 7 years, and the intramedullary lesion could not be seen with repeated spinal magnetic resonance imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/20. Zoster paresis of the shoulder. Case report and review of the literature.

    More than 95% of people in the united states are infected with the varicella zoster virus at some time in life, and this infection usually is manifested as chicken pox during childhood. The virus then establishes a latent infection of sensory ganglia, from which it may reactivate many years later to cause herpes zoster (shingles), a cutaneous painful rash along a dermatomal distribution. Less commonly, the varicella zoster virus may result in myotomal motor weakness or paralysis in addition to a painful dermatomal rash. A case of unilateral left C5-C6 segmental paresis attributable to herpes zoster in an otherwise healthy individual and a current review of the literature are presented. A case of zoster paresis of the shoulder muscles is presented to remind the orthopaedic community that this diagnosis may be confused with other diagnoses, including rotator cuff tear, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of shoulder pain and shoulder girdle muscle weakness.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.8590295793226
keywords = zoster, herpes zoster, varicella, herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/20. Diagnostic usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in influenza-associated acute encephalopathy or encephalitis.

    A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was performed for a 20-month-old girl with an influenza type A infection who presented acute encephalopathy. Conventional MRI performed 8 days after the onset of encephalopathy, including T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, revealed only vague lesions in the right frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. In contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) then demonstrated the lesions much more intensively. On the 26th day, the lesions previously observed on DWI had become less discernible. The hyperintensity observed on DWI might reflect cytotoxic edema. Thus, DWI may be useful for evaluation of acute influenzal encephalopathy/encephalitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/20. autoimmunity to munc-18 in Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare disease of the central nervous system characterized by severe epileptic seizures, progressive degeneration of a single cerebral hemisphere, and autoimmunity directed against glutamate receptor subunit, GluR3. We report here the identification of high-titer autoantibodies directed against munc-18 in the serum of a single patient with RE previously shown to have anti-GluR3 antibodies. Munc-18 is an intracellular protein residing in presynaptic terminals, which is required for secretion of neurotransmitters. These findings are consistent with the possibility of intermolecular epitope spreading between GluR3, a postsynaptic cell surface protein, and munc-18, a presynaptic intracellular protein. Immune attack on these two proteins, which participate at distinct steps of synaptic transmission, could act in an additive or synergistic manner to impair synaptic function and lead to seizures and neuronal death.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/20. Metameric motor paresis following abdominal herpes zoster.

    Motor neuropathy is an uncommon complication that may follow an outbreak of herpes zoster (HZ). About half of the reported cases have involved the cranial nerves, typically the facial nerve. The remaining cases have affected the nerves of the extremities. Interestingly, motor weakness of the thoracic segments is strikingly rare, even though this is where HZ most frequently occurs. The dermatologic literature reports only exceptions to this occurence. We report a new case of motor paresis following HZ infection in an abdominal location, where this complication can be easily misdiagnosed as abdominal herniation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.0295833342475
keywords = zoster, herpes zoster, herpes
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/20. Chronic active VZV infection manifesting as zoster sine herpete, zoster paresis and myelopathy.

    After lumbar-distribution zoster, an HTLV-1-seropositive woman developed chronic radicular sacral-distribution pain (zoster sine herpete), cervical-distribution zoster paresis and thoracic-distribution myelopathy. Detection of anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) IgM and VZV IgG antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with reduced serum/CSF ratios of anti-VZV IgG compared to normal serum/CSF ratios for albumin and total IgG, proved that VZV caused the protracted neurological complications. diagnosis by antibody testing led to aggressive antiviral treatment and a favorable outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.8709250202536
keywords = zoster, varicella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/20. subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting with hemiparesis in childhood: case report.

    subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a chronic and fatal disease of the central nervous system. Most patients present with progressive psychointellectual disturbances. A 14-month-old girl was admitted to our hospital because of left-sided hemiparesis. During hospitalization, focal and generalized seizures occurred. The electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that periodic lateralized discharges consisted of polyspike and high-voltage slow waves in the left hemisphere. The clinical and EEG findings and positive serology of measles in the cerebrospinal fluid were consistent with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. In conclusion, we suggest that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis be considered in the differential diagnosis of focal neurologic signs in infants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/20. Zoster paresis.

    herpes zoster (HZ) is essentially a viral disease of the posterior root ganglia and sensory nerve fibers, which presents clinically with vesicular eruption of the skin, radicular pain and sensory changes in the distribution of the affected ganglion. However, motor involvement can be seen as well. If classic cutaneous lesions are present, HZ-related motor paresis is easily diagnosed. Otherwise, the diagnosis may be suspicious, especially if the weakness occurs before the cutaneous lesions have appeared, or weeks after they have subsided. We present a patient with HZ-related motor paresis due to radiculopathy in the cervical segments whose motor symptoms and signs appear as major clinical features.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.40450732356588
keywords = zoster
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/20. Rasmussen encephalitis with active inflammation and delayed seizures onset.

    Severe focal epilepsy is regarded as a clinical hallmark of Rasmussen encephalitis (RE). The authors report two children with progressive hemiparesis, contralateral hemispheric atrophy, and pathologic features characteristic for RE. At histologic diagnosis and over several months, neither patient experienced seizures. The report enlarges the clinical spectrum of RE and suggests that seizures are not an obligatory presenting symptom of the disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Paresis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.