Cases reported "Paresthesia"

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11/29. Case report: whiplash-associated disorder from a low-velocity bumper car collision: history, evaluation, and surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a patient with a whiplash-associated disorder following a bumper car collision. Imaging studies failed to provide an anatomic explanation for the debilitating symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To report a chronic, debilitating pain syndrome after a low-velocity bumper car collision while using complex range-of-motion data for the diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical indication in whiplash-associated disorder. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The controversy of whiplash-associated disorder mainly concerns pathophysiology and collision dynamics. Although many investigations attempt to define a universal lesion or determine a threshold of force that may cause permanent injury, no consensus has been reached. methods: Eight years after a low-velocity collision, the patient underwent surgical excision of multiple painful trigger points in the posterior neck. Computerized motion analysis was used for pre- and postoperative evaluations. RESULTS: Surgical treatment resulted in an increase in total active range of motion by 20%, reduced intake of pain medication, doubled the number of work hours, and generally led to a dramatic improvement in quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: This case of whiplash-associated disorder after a low-velocity collision highlights the difficulty in defining threshold of injury in regard to velocity. It also illustrates the value of computerized motion analysis in confirming the diagnosis of whiplash-associated disorder and in the evaluation of prognosis and treatment.
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12/29. Cervical spondylodiscitis from an ingested pin: a case report.

    In the pediatric literature, only 1 case of cervical spondylodiscitis from an ingested foreign body is reported and this was caused by a blunt radiolucent foreign body. The authors now describe a unique case of a 13-year-old teenaged boy who presented with neck pain 6 days after accidental ingestion of a sewing pin. Uncomplicated removal of this pin was followed in 36 days by the development of cervical spondylodiscitis that failed conservative management and required surgical debridement and arthrodesis. physicians should be aware of the possibility of this complication in any patient that presents with neck pain after foreign body ingestion.
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keywords = neck
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13/29. Bilateral spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissections have been reported, but spontaneous bilateral dissections are rare. Internal carotid artery dissection can present with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from headache to completed stroke. Two cases of spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection are presented, one with headache and minimal symptoms and the other with a stroke syndrome. No cause could be found in either case, making the dissections completely spontaneous. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) should be considered in young patients with unexplained head and neck pain with or without focal neurological symptoms and signs. The increasing availability of imaging would sustain the higher index of suspicion.
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keywords = neck
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14/29. rhabdomyosarcoma of the mandible in a 6-year-old boy.

    INTRODUCTION: rhabdomyosarcoma is an aggressive malignant tumour composed of neoplastic mesenchymal cells that infiltrate surrounding tissue structures, making their precise site of origin unclear. Although rare, this is highly aggressive and the most common soft-tissue neoplasm of the head and neck in children. Regrettably by the time most cases are initially seen, the patients already have large tumours, due to rapid tumour growth and delayed medical consultation. CASE REPORT: This report describes a 6-year-old presenting with just such symptoms of facial swelling and pain but elicitation of further information and findings, including tooth mobility of 3 days duration, led to prompt referral and early treatment of an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. CONCLUSION: General dental practitioners are frequently presented with a child with a swollen face and pain. Experience would suggest a dental abscess to be the most likely cause with treatment as appropriate. However, all swellings in children, should be thoroughly investigated and reviewed as particularly in this age group, tumour growth is rapid while early diagnosis allows successful treatment with multimodality therapy.
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keywords = neck
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15/29. Extraosseous schwannoma of the mental nerve clinically simulating intraosseous.

    We report a case of a benign neurilemmoma arising from the right mental nerve. Schwannomas are rare neurogenic tumours that originate from schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. Frequent locations are the head and neck region. Most of the tumours occur in the soft tissue whereas intraosseous schwannomas are rare. This case report deals with a young patient who was referred to our hospital with an unidentified fast-growing tumour located mainly in the premolar region of the right mandible. The tumour presented as an expansive, unilocular, well defined, radiolucent lesion on orthopantomography. No expansion of the mandibular canal could be seen. Computerized tomography scans of the mandible helped to identify the solid nature of the tumour. A biopsy was necessary to make the final diagnosis and the tumour was then excised surgically. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans and a histological examination of the surgical specimen showed no signs of neurofibromatosis type 2.
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16/29. Three case reports of hand-foot syndrome with gefitinib.

    hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is commonly reported in treatment with liposomal doxorubicin (LD) and capecitabine. We present 3 cases of HFS recall with gefitinib after previous LD therapy. The first 2 cases, in patients with head and neck cancer previously treated with paclitaxel and LD, developed on subsequent therapy with gefitinib. One patient had previously developed HFS on LD and the other had not. In both patients HFS resolved after stopping gefitinib. The third case is of a patient with ovarian cancer, also treated with gefitinib after LD, who developed HFS recall which resolved after gefitinib withdrawal. HFS can occur with gefitinib in patients who have been previously exposed to agents known to cause HFS.
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keywords = neck
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17/29. Facial onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN syndrome): a novel syndrome in neurology.

    A 'syringomyelia-like' syndrome has been infrequently reported in neurological disorders such as Tangiers disease and lepromatous leprosy. This study reports a novel 'syringomyelia-like' syndrome in four adult male patients, which we have termed facial onset sensory and motor neuronopathy, or FOSMN syndrome, that appears to have a neurodegenerative aetiology. Clinical, neurophysiological and pathological data of four patients were reviewed, including the autopsy in one patient. Four male patients (mean age at onset 43), initially developed paraesthesiae and numbness in a trigeminal nerve distribution, which slowly progressed to involve the scalp, neck, upper trunk and upper limbs in sequential order. Motor manifestations, including cramps, fasciculations, dysphagia, dysarthria, muscle weakness and atrophy developed later in the course of the illness. Neurophysiological findings revealed a generalized sensory motor neuronopathy of caudally decreasing severity in all four patients. autopsy in one patient disclosed loss of motoneurons in the hypoglossal nucleus and cervical anterior horns, along with loss of sensory neurons in the main trigeminal sensory nucleus and dorsal root ganglia. FOSMN syndrome appears to be a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder, whose pathogenesis remains to be determined.
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keywords = neck
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18/29. Protracted Lhermitte's sign following head and neck irradiation.

    Lhermitte's sign is a rare complication of head and neck irradiation involving the delivery of dose to the cervical spinal cord. Although uncommon, symptoms of lightning-like electric sensations spreading into both arms, down the dorsal spine, and into both legs on neck flexion following head and neck irradiation, causes great concern in both the patient and the physician. This spontaneously reversible phenomenon is important for the otolaryngologist and radiation oncologist to recognize and discuss. A particularly severe and protracted case of Lhermitte's sign involving a patient recently completing a radical course of radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is described in detail, including a review of the literature surrounding the cause and management of this condition.
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keywords = neck
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19/29. lip paresthesia associated with a jaw mass.

    A case is reported in which mandibular swelling and lower lip numbness were the first signs of a metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. The development of paresthesia, with or without other oral symptoms, requires that a diagnosis of malignancy be considered until confirmed or ruled out by tissue biopsy. A thorough head and neck examination in all patients, especially in those whose history or habits may indicate increased risk of malignancy is necessary.
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keywords = neck
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20/29. The minor symptoms of increased intracranial pressure: 101 patients with benign intracranial hypertension.

    Of 101 patients with benign intracranial hypertension not related to vasculitis, neck stiffness occurred in 31, tinnitus in 27, distal extremity paresthesias in 22, joint pains in 13, low back pain in 5, and gait "ataxia" in 4. Symptoms resolved promptly upon lowering the intracranial pressure by lumbar puncture, and were probably directly caused by intracranial hypertension. awareness of these "minor" symptoms of increased intracranial pressure can facilitate diagnosis and management.
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