Cases reported "Paresthesia"

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1/228. Effects of altering cycling technique on gluteus medius syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: We discuss how altering the cycling technique of a cyclist receiving periodic chiropractic care helped in the management of gluteus medius syndrome. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 24-year-old male amateur cyclist had numbness and tingling localized to a small region on the superior portion of the right buttock. The area involved demonstrated paresthesia to light touch sensory evaluation. The cyclist had received chiropractic adjustments 2 days before the onset of the symptoms. One week earlier, the patient began riding a new bicycle with different gearing than his previous one. Manual-resisted muscle testing created soreness in the lumbosacral area and buttocks. trigger points were identified in the right gluteus medius. Standing lumbar spine flexion was 70 degrees, limited by tight hamstrings. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: Because the patient was already receiving periodic chiropractic care, no passive therapy was used. Patient education regarding the difference in gear selection in bicycles of a higher quality was provided. He was instructed to train in lower gears than he had previously used and to maintain a cadence of 70 to 90 revolutions of the pedals per minute. After 2 days, the paresthesia on the right buttock resolved. The trigger points were only mildly tender with minimal residual soreness of the involved muscles. CONCLUSION: Management of gluteus medius syndrome by altering the cadence and gear development for a bicyclist is discussed. Either frank or cumulative injury to the gluteus medius muscle is the typical etiologic factor for this syndrome. Repetitive strain of the patient's gluteus medius muscle as a result of poor cycling technique appeared to be the cause here. knowledge of bicycle fitting, training techniques, and bicycle mechanics appeared necessary to resolve the problem.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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2/228. Meralgia paresthetica secondary to limb length discrepancy: case report.

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysthesia in the lateral thigh caused by entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (L2-L3) underneath the inguinal ligament. Abdominal distension, tight clothing, and hip hyperextension are all described causes of this condition. To our knowledge this has never been attributed to a limb length discrepancy. We present a 51-year-old man with a long-standing history of right sided meralgia paresthetica. history and physical and radiological examination were unrewarding except that his left leg was shorter than the right by 2 cm. Nerve conduction studies of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve on the left had a normal latency and amplitude but were absent on the right. To prove the hpothesis that the limb length discrepancy was responsible for the condition, a single subject study was performed. The presence or absence of pain and dysesthesia in the right thigh was the observed behavior. Intervention consisted of wearing a 1.5-cm lift in the left or right shoe for 2 weeks each with an intervening 2-week lift-free period. pain was recorded on a numeric scale and numbness as being present or absent. There was continuing pain without and with the lift in the right shoe but no pain or numbness with the lift in left shoe. It was concluded that the limb length discrepancy was responsible for the meralgia paresthetica. Pertinent literature and possible pathomechanics are discussed.
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ranking = 23.911064591533
keywords = nerve
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3/228. median nerve damage from brachial artery puncture: a case report.

    This report describes a case in which puncture of the brachial artery to obtain a sample for blood-gas analysis resulted in damage to the median nerve with a persisting neuropathy and apparent loss of function. Errors in judgment and contributions to possible negligence included (1) inappropriate choice of sampling site; (2) lack of knowledge of precautions and possible complications; (3) incomplete/inadequate description of optimal procedure in departmental procedure manual; (4) arbitrary selection of the dominant hand.
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ranking = 59.777661478832
keywords = nerve
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4/228. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as lower lip paraesthesia in a 24 year old Nigerian. Case report.

    An unusual case of stage D Burkitt's lymphoma in a 24 year old Nigerian female undergraduate is reported. There was a four month history of left lower lip paraesthesia followed three months later by a slowly progressive 'pimple-sized' nodular mandibular swelling arising from the mental foramen region. A full-blown, rapidly developing abdominal mass manifested only three weeks after a biopsy of the mandibular swelling. Aspiration of the latter and a histologic report of the mandibular mass confirmed Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient responded very well to appropriate chemotherapy. Clinicians should not overlook insidious jaw swellings in any adult residing in the endemic zone of Burkitt's lymphoma, in view of the fact that successful therapy is dependent on early diagnosis. Mental nerve paraesthesia is very rarely seen in Burkitt's lymphoma.
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ranking = 11.955532295766
keywords = nerve
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5/228. A case of referred pain evoked by remote light touch after partial nerve injury.

    An unusual case of referred pain is presented in which a 63-year-old man, who suffered a severe injury to his right hand and arm during young adulthood, describes the later development of dysesthesia and shooting pain in his arm subsequent to stimulation of the ipsilateral scalp, the temporal and infrazygomatic region of the face, and the back. Referred sensations of this type are usually reported following amputation of an arm. Clinical examination of the sensory and motor function of the arm and hand revealed partial damage to the radial, ulnar and median nerves as well as possible brachial plexus involvement. Interestingly, pain could be evoked by repeated light touches applied to the remote trigger areas suggesting the involvement of a 'wind-up'-like process.
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ranking = 316.8739390415
keywords = nerve injury, nerve, injury
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6/228. occupational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer induces generalised neuropathy in a dental technician.

    A 36-year-old dental technician for 14 years developed paraesthesia and numbness in her legs. Neurophysiological studies revealed absent sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) from her lower limbs and normal upper limb SNAPs on presentation. Motor nerve studies were normal. Repeat studies 2 months after leaving her job showed some improvement in the lower limb SNAPs. It is suggested that her symptoms were caused by occupational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer.
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ranking = 23.911064591533
keywords = nerve
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7/228. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous neuropathy in a windsurfer.

    Lateral antebrachial cutaneous neuropathy (LACN) was diagnosed in a young woman who developed pain and paresthesias in the right forearm after a long day of windsurfing (board sailing). The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment, including cessation of windsurfing and a brief course of oral corticosteroids. There was a permanent residual cutaneous sensory deficit in the distribution of the LACN. LACN is important to recognize because the symptomatology may mimic pathology of a cervical root, the brachial plexus, and the radial and median nerves at the level of the elbow.
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ranking = 11.955532295766
keywords = nerve
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8/228. Quadrangular space syndrome associated with superficial radial sensory neuropathy.

    Compression of the axillary nerve in the quadrangular space is an unusual cause of pain and paresthesia of the upper extremity. In this report, the authors present a patient with a 1-year history of an undiagnosed axillary nerve compression associated with radial sensory neuropathy who improved after surgical decompression of the quadrangular space.
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ranking = 23.911064591533
keywords = nerve
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9/228. Resolution of MRI abnormalities of the oculomotor nerve in childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine.

    ophthalmoplegic migraine is an uncommon disorder, usually starting in older childhood. Its physiopathology remains obscure and diagnosis is reliant on clinical grounds and exclusion of other disorders. We report four cases of childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine, one of them starting in infancy. association with other types of migraine is common. Two of the three patients studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enhancement and enlargement of the cisternal portion of the oculomotor nerve, which spontaneously resolved after 2 and 4 years, respectively. Persistence of clinical recurrences was associated with long-lasting presence of the MRI finding, and possibly with mild sequelae. These radiological abnormalities suggest a common physiopathological mechanism with other inflammatory diseases, except for a benign evolution which, added to its specific anatomic site, seems to be the only neuroradiological marker, besides normality, in ophthalmoplegic migraine. The very long potential duration of MRI changes and the scarcity of clinical episodes make feasible its incident discovery once the migraine attack has become a remote memory.
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ranking = 59.777661478832
keywords = nerve
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10/228. Ulnar conduction block at the wrist.

    Two cases of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist are reported. The lesions had an acute onset and exclusively impaired the ulnar motor deep branch. The coexistence of carpal tunnel syndrome in each case allowed an early diagnosis but was somewhat misleading. In both cases, the use of classic motor and sensory conduction studies did not provide clear abnormalities that would have precisely determined the site of the nerve lesion. In both cases, only palmar stimulation of the ulnar motor deep branch showed an important conduction block. This electrodiagnostic finding showed definitively the site of the ulnar nerve lesion at the wrist and excluded proximal ulnar nerve lesions or C8-T1 radiculopathy. In both cases recovery occurred without surgery.
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ranking = 47.822129183065
keywords = nerve
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