Cases reported "Peliosis Hepatis"

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1/5. Absence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus dna in bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis lesions.

    bartonella henselae and B. quintana induce an unusual vascular proliferative tissue response known as bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and bacillary peliosis (BP) in some human hosts. The mechanisms of Bartonella-associated vascular proliferation remain unclear. Although host factors probably play a role, microbial coinfection has not been ruled out. Because of the vascular proliferative characteristics noted in both Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and BA and occasional colocalization of KS and BA, the possibility was explored that KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) might be associated with BA lesions. tissues with BA and positive and negative control tissues were tested for the presence of KSHV dna by a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. Only 1 of 10 BA tissues, a splenic biopsy, was positive in this assay; this tissue was from a patient with concomitant KS of the skin. Thus, KSHV is probably not involved in the vascular proliferative response seen in BA-BP.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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2/5. Hepatic rupture caused by peliosis hepatis.

    peliosis hepatis is a rare entity that can affect children and cause fatal hepatic hemorrhage or hepatic failure. Radiographic findings are nonspecific and can resemble other hepatic pathologies such as cysts, abscesses, metastases, and hemangiomatosis. peliosis hepatis can resolve spontaneously or by withdrawal of inciting medications. Certain cases may require surgical resection of the involved portions of the liver. Recently, fatal liver hemorrhage was reported in 2 pediatric patients with a rare congenital muscle disorder known as myotubular (centronuclear) myopathy. One of these patients was found at autopsy to have peliosis hepatis. The authors report the first successful treatment of life-threatening liver hemorrhage caused by peliosis hepatis in a child with myotubular myopathy. awareness of this condition may reduce the catastrophic complications seen with peliosis hepatis.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = angiomatosis
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3/5. Abdominal visceral peliosis associated with bacillary angiomatosis. Ultrastructural evidence of endothelial destruction by bacilli.

    Peliosis involving solid internal organs is a rare entity, and it has been reported in association with chronic debilitating diseases. Bacillary angiomatosis (BA), on the other hand, is a recently identified lesion found virtually only in individuals infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. We describe herein two cases of visceral BA and peliosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Based on light and electron microscopic findings, we conclude that (1) BA bacilli present in the hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, in a suitable host milieu, may be the causative agents of peliosis hepatis; (2) BA bacilli can be found both intracellularly and extracellularly; and (3) peliosis is also identified in association with BA in abdominal lymph nodes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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4/5. Rochalimaea henselae causes bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis.

    BACKGROUND--Recent studies have demonstrated that a newly described agent of persistent bacteremia, Rochalimaea henselae, and the agent of bacillary angiomatosis are both closely related to Rochalimaea quintana. Bacillary peliosis hepatis seemed likely to have the same etiologic agent as bacillary angiomatosis. We sought these pathologic changes in patients from whom R henselae was cultivated. methods--For two patients whose histopathologic findings we reviewed, additional light and electron microscopy were performed. Their bacterial isolates were compared by electrophoretic patterns of outer membrane proteins, restriction endonuclease digestion patterns of dna, and reaction with murine antiserum. RESULTS--A previously reported human immunodeficiency virus-infected man with persistent bacteremia due to R henselae was found to have bacillary peliosis hepatis. Rochalimaea henselae was also isolated from the spleen of a woman receiving immunosuppressive therapy after allogeneic renal transplantation. She had developed fever, liver and spleen nodules, and periaortic lymphadenopathy. Bacillary peliosis of her liver and spleen, as well as bacillary angiomatosis of liver, spleen, and a lymph node, were found. The bacterial isolates had comparable electrophoretic patterns of outer membrane proteins and of restriction endonuclease-digested dna, which differed from the respective patterns of R quintana. Murine antisera raised to the first isolate reacted strongly with the second by means of immunoblot and immunofluorescence techniques, while reacting only weakly with R quintana. CONCLUSION--Rochalimaea henselae, recently recognized to cause persistent fever and bacteremia in immunocompetent and immunocompromised persons, also causes bacillary angiomatosis and parenchymal bacillary peliosis.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = angiomatosis
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5/5. Hepatic peliosis (bacillary angiomatosis) in AIDS: CT findings.

    patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are at risk of developing opportunistic infections and aggressive tumors. Computed tomographic examination is the usual method of evaluating the abdomen and pelvis in these patients. Although this technique is reasonably sensitive in detecting pathology, findings are often nonspecific. A case of hepatic peliosis (bacillary angiomatosis) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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