Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. Primary non Hodgkin's lymphoma of the vagina.

    The genital tract as a primary site of malignant lymphoma in women is extremely rare. This report concerns a 64 year old patient with a primary vaginal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (large cell B lineage according to the REAL classification--centroblastic type according to the Kiel classification--"G" according Working Formulation) with an unusual clinical presentation--pelvic discomfort accompanied by frequent ureteral-like colic. Due to gynecological onset symptoms and the rarity of this extranodal primary site misinterpretation of a primary vaginal lymphoma as a benign inflammatory disease or endometriosis may occur. We emphasize the importance of their recognition and also the differential diagnosis of cervical lymphoma from other neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. Computed tomography guided core needle biopsy diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis.

    BACKGROUND: Pelvic actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative inflammatory disease caused by the anaerobic Gram-positive bacilli actinomyces israelii. The propensity of this disease to simulate gynecological malignancies has been described previously. The great majority of these patients were diagnosed with actinomycotic diseases during or after exploratory laparotomy, but rarely preoperatively. We reviewed the literature pertaining the management of pelvic actinomycosis. CASE: A nulliparous woman with a long history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) and recent Papanicolaou smear findings consistent with the presence of actinomyces presented with chronic vague lower abdominal pain, weight loss, poor appetite, and recent increase in abdominal girth associated with a large immobile pelvic mass. Transcutaneous computed tomography guided core needle biopsy established the diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis obviating immediate surgical intervention. Intravenous and subsequent long-term oral penicillin therapy was constituted and resulted in a significant decrease in the size of the pelvic mass. CONCLUSION: In patients presenting with pelvic masses and a history of IUD placement, actinomycotic infection should be considered and diagnosis attempted by imaging guided needle biopsy. Furthermore, this case suggested that correct nonsurgical diagnosis of pelvic actinomycosis followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy might eliminate the need for extensive extirpative surgery and assist in maintaining future fertility.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. Value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in gynecologic infections.

    The ESR remains a valuable test in gynecology, specifically when obtained sequentially in cases of pelvic infection. It is nonspecific but has much merit in assessing prognosis and therapeutic measures. In conjunction with laparoscopy and diagnostic ultrasound it plays an important part in the evaluation of abdominal and pelvic infections.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. Advanced actinomycotic pelvic inflammatory disease simulating gynecologic malignancy. A report of two cases.

    Two women had large, solid, fixed pelvic masses simulating advanced ovarian cancer in one case and advanced cervical cancer in the other. Both patients had had plastic intrauterine contraceptive devices in situ for 7 and 17 years, respectively. Both patients required laparotomy to make the diagnosis. In both the surgery was markedly difficult because of the total absence of tissue planes. Both had obvious actinomycotic disease on routine histologic examination of the ovary and were treated with prolonged penicillin, with some, but not total, resolution of the pelvic fibrosis. The diagnosis of advanced actinomycotic pelvic inflammatory disease should be entertained in patients with a large, solid pelvic mass and an intrauterine device in situ or a recent history of intrauterine device use.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Septic pelvic thrombophlebitis: an update.

    Septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is the result of serious pelvic infection usually following obstetric or gynecologic procedures. The management of this condition is of historical interest to the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Tulane, and therefore a retrospective case evaluation and a prospective surveillance were undertaken. This study indicates that septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is seen very rarely today. Possible reasons for the decline in the incidence of this problem and a management plan are presented. Three cases are included.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. pelvic inflammatory disease. A review.

    pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a bacterial infection centered in the fallopian tubes, is increasingly encountered among adolescents seen by the pediatrician. This review describes two cases representative of gonococcal and nongonococcal PID and the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of this disorder are discussed. Emphasis is placed on management by the primary care pediatrician and indications for gynecologic consultation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. Toxic shock syndrome mimicking pelvic inflammatory disease presumably resulting from tattoo.

    The female patient with a variety of genital tract symptoms offers a distinct challenge to the gynecologist. We report a case that on initial examination was thought to be pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). After further evaluation, our patient was found to be suffering from toxic shock syndrome, which in many ways may resemble PID. This case demonstrates the importance of a careful and thorough evaluation of the gynecologic patient who has several nonspecific signs and symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. Percutaneous abscess drainage in gynecologic cancer patients.

    Percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) is regarded as an alternative treatment for the care of the gynecologic cancer patient with a pelvic infection. Four female patients with infected pelvic malignancies were evaluated and treated with PAD at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital over a 4-year period. Abscesses in three of the four patients were drained successfully and the catheters were ultimately removed. Successful drainage was defined as a good clinical response and avoidance of surgical debridement. For the patient with an infected pelvic malignancy, PAD offers an alternative to surgery without associated morbidity. Our experience indicates PAD is associated with expedient clinical recovery and preservation of quality of life for most patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. diverticulitis mimicking a tuboovarian abscess. Report of a case in a young woman.

    BACKGROUND: diverticulitis is an uncommon condition in young women. When it occurs, it is often not recognized until complications such as perforation or fistulization occur. There has been no recent discussion in the gynecologic literature of diverticulitis in a young woman presenting as gynecologic disease. CASE: A 31-year-old woman with a long history of "irritable bowel syndrome" developed a 4-5-cm left adnexal mass associated with mild discomfort and dysparunia. Acute worsening of her pain led to abdominal exploration and left salpingo-oophorectomy for an unruptured tuboovarian abscess. She initially improved but then developed a recurrent pelvic abscess. Workup revealed extensive diverticulosis with probable sigmoid diverticulitis. Reexploration, drainage of the abscess and fecal diversion were required. CONCLUSION: Because of the proximity of the left ovary to the sigmoid colon, it is possible for diverticulitis to perforate into the ovary, producing a tuboovarian abscess indistinguishable from that due to other more common causes. A high index of suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially in young women. Failure to treat underlying diverticulitis can lead to persistent or recurrent pelvic infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Bilateral tubo-ovarian abscesses four years after total abdominal hysterectomy.

    BACKGROUND: pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common gynecologic disorder. One known complication of PID is tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) formation. The predominant theory on TOA formation postulates that an ascending infection from the cervix through the uterus to the fallopian tubes and ovaries results in abscess formation. Other theories include seeding via a hematogenous infection, diverticular disease, and appendicitis. CASE: A 39-year-old female patient with abdominal pain was referred to our institution and was found to have a pelvic mass. After a thorough evaluation, surgical exploration revealed the presence of TOA. No evidence of gastrointestinal disease was present. The patient's history was significant for an uncomplicated total abdominal hysterectomy for benign disease of the uterus four years prior. abscess cultures grew streptococcus intermedius. CONCLUSION: This case reports the rare occurrence of TOA in a patient who had undergone an abdominal hysterectomy four years prior to presentation. If the patient reports a surgical history of prior hysterectomy, TOA is often stricken from consideration. Although unlikely, adnexal abscess formation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass, even with a remote history of hysterectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pelvic Inflammatory Disease'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.