Cases reported "Peptic Ulcer Perforation"

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1/43. Ulcer perforation in gastric urinary conduit: never use a gastric segment in the urinary tract if there are other options available.

    A male patient, who had had a conservatively treated hemorrhagic peptic ulcer 12 years earlier, underwent gastrocystoplasty after radical cystoprostatectomy for carcinoma of the urinary bladder. After operation the patient suffered urinary incontinence and dysuria which he found so bothersome that the gastric bladder was converted to diversion using the same gastric segment as a tube. Postoperatively there were clots of blood in stomal urine and after the kidneys had been drained intestinal fluid oozed from the stoma. On the 14th postoperative day the patient died of pulmonary embolism. The autopsy showed a perforated peptic ulcer in the gastric segment resulting in a closed fistula to the small bowel. Most probably the reason for development of the peptic ulcer was stress caused by the operation and it might have been avoided by using hydrogen-blocking agents. This case seriously questions whether a gastric segment should be used in the urinary tract at all, and at least it should never be used as a conduit.
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2/43. Perforated peptic ulcer in an infant.

    We describe a case of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) in a 9-month-old boy. Abdominal distension was the first clinical sign of PPU. Before he developed abdominal distension, the patient had suffered from an upper respiratory tract infection with fever for about 2 weeks, which was treated intermittently with ibuprofen. A plain abdominal radiograph revealed pneumoperitoneum with a football sign. At laparotomy, a 0.8-cm perforated hole was found over the prepyloric area. Simple closure with omental patching was performed after debridement of the perforation. Pathologic examination showed chronic peptic ulcer with helicobacter pylori infection. The postoperative course and outcome were satisfactory. The stress of underlying disease, use of ibuprofen, blood type (A), and H. pylori infection might have contributed to the development of PPU in this patient. PPU in infancy is rare and has a high mortality rate; early recognition and prompt surgical intervention are key to successful management.
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3/43. Late oesophageal perforation after intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography.

    Serious haemodynamic instability occurred during emergency surgery for a perforated duodenal ulcer in a 72-year-old man with acute myocardial infarction. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography was crucial for diagnosis of the location of myocardial infarction in the right ventricle and the subsequent haemodynamic management. Postoperatively, a thrombus in the right coronary artery was removed by coronary angiography. The patient's trachea was extubated on the fourth postoperative day. Another 4 days later a leak in the lower oesophagus was suspected because of pleural empyema, and verified. The patient's trachea had to be re-intubated and an oesophageal stent was inserted. The patient was discharged, fully recovered, 2 months after the operation.
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4/43. Sonographic diagnosis and successful nonoperative management of sealed perforated duodenal ulcer.

    We encountered a case of sealed perforated duodenal ulcer in a 75-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic renal failure. Abdominal sonography showed a bright linear echo within the thickened anterior wall of the duodenal bulb and the presence of free air at the anterior surface of the liver. We found no signs of direct communication between the duodenal lumen and the peritoneal cavity or any free fluid. On follow-up sonography performed every 2 days during the first week of the patient's hospitalization, no free fluid was found in the abdomen. The use of sonography to diagnose this patient's sealed perforated duodenal ulcer and to monitor the ulcer for the appearance of free fluid allowed us to provide successful nonsurgical management to this patient. We believe that the use of abdominal sonography in all patients suspected of having a perforated duodenal ulcer may help increase the diagnostic accuracy of this modality and may reduce the need for surgery in such patients.
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5/43. Laparoscopic suture repair of a perforated gastric ulcer in a severely cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension: first case report.

    BACKGROUND: Open digestive surgery in cirrhotic patients is associated with high morbidity and mortality. laparoscopy in this setting has the potential to reduce postoperative complications. Laparoscopic treatment of a perforated gastric ulcer in a severely cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension is herein described. methods: A 75-year-old woman affected by cirrhosis of the liver (child class C) and chronic gastric ulcer presented with acute abdominal pain. The diagnosis of perforation was made with plain films of the abdomen and computed tomography. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed intense peritonitis due to a perforated ulcer of the anterior gastric wall, 2 cm proximal to the pylorus. Suture closure and placement of an omental patch were performed laparoscopically. RESULTS: Postoperative recovery was complicated by a minor leak of the gastric suture, managed by total parenteral nutrition. Closure of the gastric wound was demonstrated by Gastrografin studies on the 10th postoperative day. The patient was discharged on the 16th postoperative day. At 3-months follow-up, the patient is alive and free of gastric disease.
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6/43. Gastric ulcer perforation in heart-lung transplant patient: a successful case of early surgical intervention and management.

    Gastrointestinal complications may follow organ transplantation. A patient who underwent heart lung transplantation due to patent ductus arteriosus and Eisenmenger's syndrome had an episode of acute cardiac rejection and was treated with a bolus injection of methylprednisolone followed by a high oral dose of prednisone. On the 22nd postoperative day, the patient complained of acute abdominal pain with muscular rigidity and a plain chest x-ray showed free air in the right subdiaphragmatic area. Under the suspicion of bowel perforation, an emergency laparotomy was performed and the perforated stomach had a wedge-shaped resection that included the perforation. Following the laparotomy, the postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on post-laparotomy day 10.
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7/43. Non-operative treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Clinical characteristics and complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration are well known. Gastro-intestinal involvement has also been recognised in these patients. However an acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer has not been documented up to now. CASE PRESENTATION: A 26-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of acute perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer is treated non-operatively with naso-gastric suction and intravenous medication. Gastrointestinal involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and therapeutic considerations in a high risk patient are discussed. CONCLUSION: Non-surgical treatment for perforated gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer should be considered in high risk patients, as is the case in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. patients must be carefully observed and operated on if non-operative treatment is unsuccessful.
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ranking = 3
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8/43. Tuberculous gastric perforation: report of a case.

    A 21-year-old woman presented with a 2-day history of acute abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a perforation in the lesser curve of the stomach. The patient suffered a bout of hematemesis, following which an endoscopy showed a bleeding blood vessel at the edge of the perforation. We performed an emergency distal gastrectomy, including the ulcer site. Histopathological examination revealed tuberculous granulation tissue and acid-fast bacilli in the ulcer. The patient was given antituberculosis therapy (ATT) postoperatively, and was well when last seen 1 year 5 months after surgery. We analyzed the clinical data of five cases of tuberculous gastric perforation (TGP), reported between 1948 and 2003, including our patient. The patients ranged in age from 21 to 45 years, with a mean age of 36.8 years (SD /- 10.21), and a male to female ratio of 3 : 2. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery or autopsy. Abdominal lymphadenopathy was present in all patients. gastrectomy was performed in four patients, and two were given ATT. All four patients in the previous reports died of their disease.
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9/43. Perforated duodenal ulcer at seven years after heart-renal transplantation: a case report.

    We experienced a rare case of perforated duodenal ulcer that occurred at seven years after heart-kidney transplantation. This patient is reported here together with a discussion of the etiology, the selection of treatment, and perioperative management. The patient was a 46-year-old man who presented with precordial pain. In 1995, he had undergone simultaneous heart and kidney transplantation in the united states and had been on long-term immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapy. His precordial pain started from May 24, 2002. He was examined at our hospital on May 27 and underwent emergency surgery with a diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal perforation. A 4-mm perforation was observed on the anterior wall of the duodenal bulb and panperitonitis was also present. Patch closure of the perforation was performed by pulling the omentum over the defect. Perioperative management consisted of his usual immunosuppressants together with antacid therapy. The postoperative course was good and he was discharged on hospital day 15. In this patient, the mechanism of perforation was assumed to involve sudden irritation combined with poor circulation in the duodenum and tissue ischemia, as well as a decrease of mucosal protective factors based on long-term corticosteroid therapy. Perforated duodenal ulcer is a rare problem after heart transplantation. Because the time that elapses after perforation is an important determinant of the prognosis, early diagnosis and appropriate surgical repair are essential.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
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10/43. Laparoscopic repair of perforated duodenal ulcer.

    Laparoscopic closure of an acutely perforated duodenal ulcer is an alternative procedure to open surgery. With proper training and experience this procedure might overtake laparotomy and simple closure thereby reducing the post operative morbidity in terms of reduced wound pain, short hospital stay, likely reduced wound sepsis and hernia occurrence and post operative chest complications. We report a 63-year old man with acute perforation of duodenal ulcer who were submitted to an emergency laparoscopic repair, first time done on the Department of Surgery, Univerisity Clinical Center of Tuzla.
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