Cases reported "Peptic Ulcer Perforation"

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11/43. Successful treatment of gastric fistula following rhabdomyolysis after vertical banded gastroplasty.

    Vertical banded gastroplasty is a gastric restrictive operation which has been performed with very satisfactory results in our department. We present a 46 year-old male with BMI 48, who experienced rhabdomyolsis after a VBG operation, complicated by perforation of an upper pouch ulcer and subsequent gastric fistula. Cardiac and renal failure occurred, necessitating intensive therapy with catecholamines, diuretics and hemodialysis. The patient underwent multiple operations, drainage of a retroperitoneal abscess, suture of a perforated ulcer, and gastric decompression by a gastrostomy. Prolonged treatment including TPN, drainage, broad spectrum antibiotics, skin and would protection and jejunostomy feeding, were necessary to obtain an eventual successful outcome. This case demonstrates that unexpected surgical complications may occur in morbidly obese patients and how difficult and long the management of these may be. Rhabdomyolsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of bariatric surgery, and careful postoperative observation of the patient is mandatory.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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12/43. Cost effective management of duodenal ulcers in uganda: interventions based on a series of seven cases.

    BACKGROUND: Our understanding of the cause and treatment of peptic ulcer disease has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. It was quite common some years ago to treat chronic ulcers surgically. These days, the operative treatment is restricted to the small proportion of ulcer patients who have complications such as perforation. The author reports seven cases of perforated duodenal ulcers seen in a surgical clinic between 1995 and 2001. Recommendations on the criteria for selecting the appropriate surgical intervention for patients with perforated duodenal ulcer are given. OBJECTIVE: To decide on the appropriate surgical interventions for patients with perforated duodenal ulcer. DESIGN: These are case series of 7 patients who presented with perforated duodenal ulcers without a history of peptic ulcer disease. MATERIALS AND methods: Seven patients presented with perforated duodenal ulcer 72 hours after perforation in a specialist surgical clinic in Kampala were analyzed. Appropriate management based on these patients is suggested. RESULTS: These patients were initially treated in upcountry clinics for acute gastritis from either alcohol consumption or suspected food poisoning. There was no duodenal ulcer history. As a result, they came to specialist surgical clinic more than 72 hours after perforation. diagnosis of perforated duodenal ulcer was made and they were operated using the appropriate surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: diagnosis of hangovers and acute gastritis from alcoholic consumption or suspected food poisoning should be treated with suspicion because the symptoms and signs may mimic perforated peptic ulcer in "silent" chronic ulcers. The final decision on the appropriate surgical intervention for patients with perforated duodenal ulcer stratifies them into two groups: The previously fit patients who have relatively mild physiological compromise imposed on previously healthy organ system by the perforation can withstand the operative stress of definitive procedure. The Second category includes patients who are critically ill, who poorly tolerate any operation and hence poor surgical risks. These require urgent, adequate resuscitation and simple suture with omental patch.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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13/43. pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis associated with perforated chronic duodenal ulcer and Meckel's diverticulum.

    A case of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) associated with perforated duodenal ulcer and Meckel's diverticulum is presented. The patient was managed with direct suturing of the perforation and reinforcement with an omental patch. Meckel's diverticulum was excised. PCI was followed up and disappeared postoperatively in the 4th week.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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14/43. duodenal ulcer perforation and pneumothorax: a case report.

    pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum are rarely observed as a complication of perforated peptic ulcer, which is a common cause of acute abdomen. We report a case of a 30-year-old male patient with abdominal pain and respiratory distress. Resulting from physical examination and laboratory data of the patient, acute abdomen and pneumothorax were diagnosed simultaneously. laparotomy revealed duodenal ulcer perforation and a simple patch closure was performed. No complications were observed during the postoperative course of the patient.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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15/43. Treating perforated jejunal ulcer, a complication in the zollinger-ellison syndrome.

    What is considered to represent the fourth case of perforated jejunal ulcer in association with the zollinger-ellison syndrome reported in the literature is discussed. Although documented in the original paper by Zollinger and Ellison, this remains a notably rare complication. Generalized peritonitis and related pathophysiological phenomena make initial definitive correction of the ulcer diathesis an extremely riskly undertaking and ill-advised. We submit that primary ulcer resection followed by total gastrectomy when the patient becomes a more suitable operative risk is the preferred method of management. The literature would appear to support this clinical view.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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16/43. Cardiac laceration and pericardial tamponade due to cardiopulmonary resuscitation after myocardial infarction.

    Complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), such as rib fractures and pneumothorax, are not uncommon. The authors report the case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent surgery for a perforated duodenal ulcer. Eighteen hours postoperatively she sustained a cardiac arrest; vigorous resuscitation efforts, using advanced cardiac life-support procedures, failed. At autopsy, she had 350 mL of fresh blood in her pericardial sac, which had caused cardiac tamponade. Three ribs were fractured at the left sternal border. Directly underneath the fractured ribs were a 0.4-cm laceration of the pericardium and an accompanying 0.7-cm laceration of the left ventricle. There was an acute thrombus in the left anterior descending artery. Microscopic examination of the heart showed acute infarction of the left ventricle in the vicinity of the laceration. This case demonstrates that vigorous CPR performed on an acutely infarcted heart can result in lethal cardiac laceration and tamponade.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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17/43. Gastropericardial and gastrobrachiocephalic vein fistulae caused by penetrating ulcers in a gastric pedicle following esophageal cancer resection: a case report.

    The gastric pedicle is commonly used for reconstruction following resection of esophageal cancer. However, we recently experienced a case in which two gastric tube ulcers occurred three months postoperatively; one penetrating into the pericardial cavity and the other into the left brachiocephalic vein. To our knowledge, no other such a case has ever been reported and we therefore report and discuss its etiology and management.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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18/43. intestinal obstruction by distension of a Foley jejunostomy catheter.

    Jejunostomies can be effective in permitting postoperative nutritional support, particularly in the patient with complicated gastrointestinal disease. In the case presented, however, distension of the Foley balloon catheter, used as the jejunostomy tube, led to intestinal obstruction which was not initially detected. Following radiographic identification of the problem, removal of the air from the Foley balloon allowed the patient to complete his convalescence from surgery. The possibility of obstruction from the Foley jejunostomy catheter should be recognized as a potential problem in the postoperative period.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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19/43. Perforated peptic ulcer. Determinants of morbidity and mortality.

    A review of 109 patients with perforated peptic ulcer revealed a sex ratio of 60:49, male:female, with mean age of 67 (76 patients greater than or equal to age 50). Peritoneal cultures were positive in 52 per cent, with the most common organisms streptococci and fungi. Subsequent infectious morbidity with these organisms was rare. Postoperative respiratory and renal failure were associated with intraoperative hypotension (systolic pressure less than 90 mm Hg). mortality was associated with age greater than 55 and intraoperative hypotension. We conclude that in the 1980s perforated peptic ulcer occurs most frequently in older patients and that acid stomach contents does not ensure sterility, yet subsequent infectious morbidity is rare. Intraoperative hypotension, which occurs especially in patients greater than 55 years, results in significant morbidity and mortality. attention to preoperative and intraoperative resuscitation is the single most effective therapy for reducing morbidity and mortality from this disease.
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ranking = 6
keywords = operative
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20/43. Barrett's ulcer: cause of spontaneous oesophageal perforation.

    We report two patients, who presented within six months with the classic clinical picture of 'spontaneous' oesophageal perforation, which was caused by a perforated Barrett's ulcer. These two cases underline the importance of postoperative endoscopy in ruling out intrinsic oesophageal disease as the cause of the rupture in every patient, who survives this life threatening condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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