Cases reported "Periapical Abscess"

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1/5. Familial hypophosphatemic vitamin d-resistant rickets: dental findings and histologic study of teeth.

    A case of familial hypophosphatemic vitamin d-resistant rickets or X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) accompanied by specific systemic and dental findings is reported. A 15-year-old boy with XLH visited our facility complaining of a toothache in the left lower canine region. Two other family members of the patient, his younger sister and their mother, also had XLH, whereas the other 2 members, his younger brother and father, are healthy. Those with XLH show systemic signs of the disease, such as growth retardation, limb deformity, and spinal curvature disorders; however, these symptoms are more severe in the patient than in the others. The patient had multiple periodontal abscesses, but no evidence of dental caries, trauma, or periodontal disease on the corresponding teeth at the time of his oral examination. A radiographic examination showed root dysplasia and enlarged pulp chambers.A histologic examination of an extracted third molar showed marked globular dentin and an increased predentin width. The abscess was thought to be caused by pulpal infection, which came from bacterial invasion through enamel cracks and dentinal microcleavage of the teeth. The treatments provided in this case are discussed.
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keywords = hypophosphatemic, rickets
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2/5. An unusual giant cell lesion in a child with vitamin d-resistant rickets.

    This paper reports the presence of a focus of giant cells in a sinus tract associated with an abscessed primary tooth in a patient with vitamin d-resistant rickets. The relevance of this giant cell lesion to the systemic disorder is discussed.
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ranking = 0.027312393872219
keywords = rickets
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3/5. Dental alterations associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by low serum phosphate levels caused by a decreased renal tubular reabsorption of inorganic phosphates. The initial complaints are a delay in the development of walking caused by deformity of the legs. Oral findings include poorly mineralized dentin, enlarged pulp chambers and root canals, and periradicular abscesses in caries-free teeth. We present three patients from the same family with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets showing bone and dental alterations.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = hypophosphatemic, rickets
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4/5. X-linked hypophosphatemia: dental and histologic findings.

    The recurrent spontaneous formation of abscesses affecting multiple noncarious primary as well as permanent teeth is the principle clinical dental feature in cases of hypophosphatemia, a condition inherited through the x chromosome. patients often have high pulp horns, large pulp chambers and dentinal clefts. We report a case of hypophosphatemic vitamin d-resistant rickets in a patient who reported to our department on multiple occasions with spontaneous abscesses in relation to his primary teeth. The aim of this article is to review the features of this disorder and to discuss the risks and benefits of the treatment options suggested in the literature.
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keywords = hypophosphatemic, rickets
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5/5. vitamin d-dependent rickets type II: report of three cases.

    In this study the dental findings of three patients with vitamin d-dependent rickets (DDR) type II with alopecia, who were treated with large doses of vitamin D3 derivatives, are described. Dental development that is at or near a normal level can be achieved in controlled patients, permitting routine treatment of carious teeth.
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ranking = 0.027312393872219
keywords = rickets
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