Cases reported "Periapical Diseases"

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1/31. erythema nodosum of dental origin.

    This paper describes the case of a patient who had erythema nodosum which disappeared following teeth extraction.
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2/31. ameloblastoma--a diagnostic problem.

    A 50-year-old female was referred by her dental practitioner. She had a periapical radiolucency associated with the lower right second premolar tooth. The tooth was root treated and subsequently apicected. Tissue curetted at the time of surgery was shown to be a solid ameloblastoma which was managed initially by marginal excision. Histopathological examination of the resection specimen demonstrated tumour at the inferior margin. A segmental resection of the mandible with an immediate reconstruction using a free tissue transfer of the iliac crest was therefore performed. The case shows the need for vigilance in dealing with periapical pathology and underlines the importance of sending all tissue specimens for histopathological analysis.
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3/31. The implant periapical lesion: four case reports and review of the literature.

    postoperative complications have been identified with implant failure in conjunction with the increased use of root-type implant restorations. The failure of osseointegrated dental implants primarily occurs as a result of peri-implantitis and occlusal overload. Less frequently reported failures, however, have been attributed to implant periapical lesions. The etiology and treatment modalities for such lesions have been speculated throughout the literature. This article discusses possible etiologies of and treatment for implant periapical lesions based on the existing literature and four case reports.
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4/31. Stafne's bone cavity in the anterior mandible: a possible diagnostic challenge.

    Stafne was the first to report the presence of "bone cavities" in the angle of 35 mandibles. Such cavities generally appear in the area between the mandibular first molar and the mandibular angle, and are not considered rare. One of their primary radiological diagnostic features is the characteristic location below the mandibular canal. Stafne's bone cavity is relatively rare in the anterior mandible. The mandibular canal is not present in the anterior mandible. As a result, diagnosis in the anterior mandible may be missed. Needless treatment modalities such as endodontic treatment, bone trephining, and bone exploration may be conducted. The purpose of the present report is to describe a new case of Stafne's bone cavity in the anterior mandible and discuss the differential diagnosis process. The dental computerized tomography scan is suggested as the most suitable noninvasive diagnostic and follow-up modality for this bony configuration in the anterior mandible.
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5/31. MRI of the teeth.

    The teeth and periapical structures were demonstrated on MRI using an open MRI system. There was good visualization of normal structures including crowns of teeth, pulp chambers and the neurovascular bundle of the inferior dental nerve. Dental and periapical pathology was shown.
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6/31. Apical healing of an endodontically treated tooth with a temporary restoration.

    A 35-yr-old, healthy male presented to the graduate endodontic clinic at indiana University School of dentistry for treatment of tooth #26. Two and one-half yr after treatment, the patient returned to the dental school for comprehensive treatment. The canal access opening had been restored with an intact interim restorative material restoration. The tooth was asymptomatic, and radiographic examination showed evidence of apical healing. In this article, a review of the literature concerning crown-down leakage is presented. A case report is given in which healing occurred after the tooth was restored with only an interim restorative material for an extended period of time.
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7/31. Periapical lesions accidentally filled with calcium hydroxide.

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of accidental and voluminous calcium hydroxide overextensions into periradicular lesions and tissues on the prognosis of periapical healing. SUMMARY: Eleven cases with periapical lesions and voluminous calcium hydroxide overextension are presented. Despite literature reports on the deleterious effects of calcium hydroxide extension in the periapical area, none of the endodontic treatments failed and surgical intervention was not indicated. KEY learning POINTS: Extensive extrusion of calcium hydroxide into the periapical tissues does not appear to comprise periapical healing. Despite this finding, the deliberate extrusion of dental materials into the apical tissues is not advocated.
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8/31. Paradental cyst mimicking a radicular cyst on the adjacent tooth: case report and review of terminology.

    A distinctive form of paradental cyst can occur on the buccal and apical aspects of erupted mandibular molars. This cyst has peculiar clinical and radiographic features, although the microscopic findings are the same as those of odontogenic inflammatory cysts. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems can occur when this lesion is misinterpreted as a radicular cyst. The purpose of this paper is to present an additional case of a paradental cyst in the buccal and mesial aspects of a mandibular second molar involving the apical area of a mandibular first molar. The difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and controversies regarding terminology are also discussed.
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9/31. Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the maxillary sinus presenting as a periapical radiolucency: a case report and review of the literature.

    We report a case of respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma of the left maxillary sinus that initially presented as a periapical radiolucency involving the left maxillary first molar. Respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma is a rare lesion that occurs in the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and nasopharynx. Most cases are found in the nasal cavity associated with the posterior nasal septum. Involvement of the maxillary sinus is very unusual, and only one other report of a respiratory epithelial adenomatoid hamartoma involving the maxillary antrum was found in a search of the literature. The current case is additionally unique as it was initially detected in the course of a dental examination. awareness of this lesion is important because inverted schneiderian papilloma and adenocarcinoma may be included in the histopathological differential diagnosis. Conservative surgical removal is curative and recurrence has not been reported.
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10/31. The healing potential of periodontal-endodontic lesions.

    Osseous lesions involving the periodontium, and which are sometimes associated with discomfort and pathologic changes such as swelling or the development of a sinus tract, are not always due to periodontal disease. Thus, it is not uncommon to find a dentition with generally good periodontal health but with one tooth having a severe isolated bony periodontal defect. In other cases, periodontal treatment may result in a general improvement, except in relation to one tooth which does not respond to the therapy. Very often these cases are instances of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions, but which are solely of pulpal origin. This paper serves to help the dental practitioner recognise the disease process underlying the condition and appreciate its effective management with non-surgical root canal treatment.
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